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"Bad Romance": Links between Psychological and Physical Aggression and Relationship Functioning in Adolescent Couples.

Seiffge-Krenke I, Burk WJ - Behav Sci (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: Assortative mating is an important issue in explaining antisocial, aggressive behavior.A substantial number of non-aggressive dyads emerged.The mutually aggressive couples showed the least adaptive relationship functioning, with a lack of supportive, trusting relationship qualities, high conflict rates and high jealousy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Mainz, Wallstrasse 3, Mainz, 55112, Germany. seiffge-krenke@uni-mainz.de.

ABSTRACT
Assortative mating is an important issue in explaining antisocial, aggressive behavior. It is yet unclear, whether the similarity paradigm fully explains frequent displays of aggression in adolescents' romantic relationships. In a sample of 194 romantic partner dyads, differences between female and male partners' reports of aggression (psychological and physical) and different measures of relationship functioning (e.g., jealousy, conflicts, and the affiliative and romantic quality of the relationship) were assessed. A hierarchical cluster analysis identified five distinct subgroups of dyads based on male and female reports of psychological and physical aggression: nonaggressive couples, couples with higher perceived aggressiveness (both physical and psychological) by females, couples with higher aggressiveness perceived by males and mutually aggressive couples. A substantial number of non-aggressive dyads emerged. Of note was the high number of females showing one-sided aggression, which was, however, not countered by their partner. The mutually aggressive couples showed the least adaptive relationship functioning, with a lack of supportive, trusting relationship qualities, high conflict rates and high jealousy. The discussion focuses on the different functions of aggression in these early romantic relations, and the aggravating impact of mutual aggression on relationship functioning and its potential antisocial outcomes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Standardized scores of the five romantic partner groups based on females’ and males’ reports of psychological and physical aggression.
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behavsci-05-00305-f001: Standardized scores of the five romantic partner groups based on females’ and males’ reports of psychological and physical aggression.

Mentions: The cluster analysis revealed that the five-cluster solution produced distinctive and homogeneous groupings that explained 62.9% of the error sum of squares. The standardized scores for these five clusters are presented in Figure 1. To interpret the clusters, we used ±0.5 SD as an indication of differences. The first group, termed nonaggressive, consisted of 79 dyads in which the males and females both reported below average levels of psychological and physical aggression. The second group, termed physical female, consisted of 38 dyads in which the females reported above average levels of physical aggression and the males reported low levels of aggression. The third group, termed aggressive male, consisted of 27 dyads in which males reported high levels of both psychological and physical aggression. The fourth group, aggressive female, included 34 dyads in which the females reported high levels of psychological and physical aggression. The final group, labeled mutually aggressive, consisted of 11 dyads in which both females and males reported high levels of psychological and physical aggression.


"Bad Romance": Links between Psychological and Physical Aggression and Relationship Functioning in Adolescent Couples.

Seiffge-Krenke I, Burk WJ - Behav Sci (Basel) (2015)

Standardized scores of the five romantic partner groups based on females’ and males’ reports of psychological and physical aggression.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493449&req=5

behavsci-05-00305-f001: Standardized scores of the five romantic partner groups based on females’ and males’ reports of psychological and physical aggression.
Mentions: The cluster analysis revealed that the five-cluster solution produced distinctive and homogeneous groupings that explained 62.9% of the error sum of squares. The standardized scores for these five clusters are presented in Figure 1. To interpret the clusters, we used ±0.5 SD as an indication of differences. The first group, termed nonaggressive, consisted of 79 dyads in which the males and females both reported below average levels of psychological and physical aggression. The second group, termed physical female, consisted of 38 dyads in which the females reported above average levels of physical aggression and the males reported low levels of aggression. The third group, termed aggressive male, consisted of 27 dyads in which males reported high levels of both psychological and physical aggression. The fourth group, aggressive female, included 34 dyads in which the females reported high levels of psychological and physical aggression. The final group, labeled mutually aggressive, consisted of 11 dyads in which both females and males reported high levels of psychological and physical aggression.

Bottom Line: Assortative mating is an important issue in explaining antisocial, aggressive behavior.A substantial number of non-aggressive dyads emerged.The mutually aggressive couples showed the least adaptive relationship functioning, with a lack of supportive, trusting relationship qualities, high conflict rates and high jealousy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Mainz, Wallstrasse 3, Mainz, 55112, Germany. seiffge-krenke@uni-mainz.de.

ABSTRACT
Assortative mating is an important issue in explaining antisocial, aggressive behavior. It is yet unclear, whether the similarity paradigm fully explains frequent displays of aggression in adolescents' romantic relationships. In a sample of 194 romantic partner dyads, differences between female and male partners' reports of aggression (psychological and physical) and different measures of relationship functioning (e.g., jealousy, conflicts, and the affiliative and romantic quality of the relationship) were assessed. A hierarchical cluster analysis identified five distinct subgroups of dyads based on male and female reports of psychological and physical aggression: nonaggressive couples, couples with higher perceived aggressiveness (both physical and psychological) by females, couples with higher aggressiveness perceived by males and mutually aggressive couples. A substantial number of non-aggressive dyads emerged. Of note was the high number of females showing one-sided aggression, which was, however, not countered by their partner. The mutually aggressive couples showed the least adaptive relationship functioning, with a lack of supportive, trusting relationship qualities, high conflict rates and high jealousy. The discussion focuses on the different functions of aggression in these early romantic relations, and the aggravating impact of mutual aggression on relationship functioning and its potential antisocial outcomes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus