Limits...
Rumble: Prevalence and Correlates of Group Fighting among Adolescents in the United States.

DeLisi M, Vaughn MG, Salas-Wright CP - Behav Sci (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: Group fighting is portrayed as a piece of Americana among delinquent youth, but the behavior produces significant multifaceted negative consequences.The prevalence of group fighting in the United States is 14.8% with 11.33% reporting 1-2 group fights and 3.46% reporting 3+ group fights.Youths who participate in 3+ group fights display the exceptionality and severity of other serious/chronic/habitual antisocial youth which suggests that group fighting should be considered a significant indicator of developing criminality.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Sociology, Iowa State University, 203A East Hall, Ames, IA 50011, USA. delisi@iastate.edu.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Group fighting is portrayed as a piece of Americana among delinquent youth, but the behavior produces significant multifaceted negative consequences. The current study examines the heterogeneity and correlates of group fighting using national-level data.

Method: Employing data from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health between 2002 and 2013 (n = 216,852), we examine links between group fighting and temperamental, parental, and academic factors as well as other externalizing behaviors (i.e., violence, crime, substance use).

Results: The prevalence of group fighting in the United States is 14.8% with 11.33% reporting 1-2 group fights and 3.46% reporting 3+ group fights. A clear severity gradient in school functioning and academic performance, sensation seeking, parental disengagement, violence and delinquency, and substance use disorders is seen in the normative, episodic, and repeat offender groups.

Conclusions: Youths who participate in 3+ group fights display the exceptionality and severity of other serious/chronic/habitual antisocial youth which suggests that group fighting should be considered a significant indicator of developing criminality.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Prevalence of substance use disorders among adolescents, by level of involvement in group fighting.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493445&req=5

behavsci-05-00214-f001: Prevalence of substance use disorders among adolescents, by level of involvement in group fighting.

Mentions: Figure 1 presents the prevalence estimates for substance use disorders among adolescents reporting no group fighting, as well as episodic and repeated group fighting. Supplementary analyses (not shown) revealed that, controlling for sociodemographic factors, adolescents reporting episodic group fighting were significantly more likely than those reporting no group fights to meet criteria for alcohol (RR = 3.53, 95% CI = 3.31–3.76), cannabis (RR = 3.33, 95% CI = 3.09–3.60), and other illicit drug use disorders (RR = 3.73, 95% CI = 3.38–4.12). Compared to youth reporting no group fights, repeat offender youth were also significantly more likely to meet criteria for alcohol (AOR = 6.88, 95% CI = 6.28–7.52), cannabis (RR = 6.17, 95% CI = 5.57–6.83), and other illicit drug use disorders (RR = 7.34, 95% CI = 6.48–8.32). Comparing episodic and repeat offender youth also revealed that repeat offenders were significantly more likely to meet criteria for alcohol (RR = 1.95, 95% CI = 1.76–2.15), cannabis (RR = 1.85, 95% CI = 1.65–2.08), and other illicit drug use (RR = 1.97, 95% CI = 1.71–2.26) disorders.


Rumble: Prevalence and Correlates of Group Fighting among Adolescents in the United States.

DeLisi M, Vaughn MG, Salas-Wright CP - Behav Sci (Basel) (2015)

Prevalence of substance use disorders among adolescents, by level of involvement in group fighting.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493445&req=5

behavsci-05-00214-f001: Prevalence of substance use disorders among adolescents, by level of involvement in group fighting.
Mentions: Figure 1 presents the prevalence estimates for substance use disorders among adolescents reporting no group fighting, as well as episodic and repeated group fighting. Supplementary analyses (not shown) revealed that, controlling for sociodemographic factors, adolescents reporting episodic group fighting were significantly more likely than those reporting no group fights to meet criteria for alcohol (RR = 3.53, 95% CI = 3.31–3.76), cannabis (RR = 3.33, 95% CI = 3.09–3.60), and other illicit drug use disorders (RR = 3.73, 95% CI = 3.38–4.12). Compared to youth reporting no group fights, repeat offender youth were also significantly more likely to meet criteria for alcohol (AOR = 6.88, 95% CI = 6.28–7.52), cannabis (RR = 6.17, 95% CI = 5.57–6.83), and other illicit drug use disorders (RR = 7.34, 95% CI = 6.48–8.32). Comparing episodic and repeat offender youth also revealed that repeat offenders were significantly more likely to meet criteria for alcohol (RR = 1.95, 95% CI = 1.76–2.15), cannabis (RR = 1.85, 95% CI = 1.65–2.08), and other illicit drug use (RR = 1.97, 95% CI = 1.71–2.26) disorders.

Bottom Line: Group fighting is portrayed as a piece of Americana among delinquent youth, but the behavior produces significant multifaceted negative consequences.The prevalence of group fighting in the United States is 14.8% with 11.33% reporting 1-2 group fights and 3.46% reporting 3+ group fights.Youths who participate in 3+ group fights display the exceptionality and severity of other serious/chronic/habitual antisocial youth which suggests that group fighting should be considered a significant indicator of developing criminality.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Sociology, Iowa State University, 203A East Hall, Ames, IA 50011, USA. delisi@iastate.edu.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Group fighting is portrayed as a piece of Americana among delinquent youth, but the behavior produces significant multifaceted negative consequences. The current study examines the heterogeneity and correlates of group fighting using national-level data.

Method: Employing data from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health between 2002 and 2013 (n = 216,852), we examine links between group fighting and temperamental, parental, and academic factors as well as other externalizing behaviors (i.e., violence, crime, substance use).

Results: The prevalence of group fighting in the United States is 14.8% with 11.33% reporting 1-2 group fights and 3.46% reporting 3+ group fights. A clear severity gradient in school functioning and academic performance, sensation seeking, parental disengagement, violence and delinquency, and substance use disorders is seen in the normative, episodic, and repeat offender groups.

Conclusions: Youths who participate in 3+ group fights display the exceptionality and severity of other serious/chronic/habitual antisocial youth which suggests that group fighting should be considered a significant indicator of developing criminality.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus