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The impact of childhood emotional abuse and experiential avoidance on maladaptive problem solving and intimate partner violence.

Bell KM, Higgins L - Behav Sci (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: The purpose of the current study was to examine the joint influences of experiential avoidance and social problem solving on the link between childhood emotional abuse (CEA) and intimate partner violence (IPV).Experiential avoidance following CEA may interfere with a person's ability to effectively problem solve in social situations, increasing risk for conflict and interpersonal violence.Findings suggest that CEA may lead some women to avoid unwanted internal experiences, which may adversely impact their ability to effectively problem solve in social situations and increase IPV risk.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Capital University, 1 College & Main, Columbus, OH 43209, USA. kbell626@capital.edu.

ABSTRACT
The purpose of the current study was to examine the joint influences of experiential avoidance and social problem solving on the link between childhood emotional abuse (CEA) and intimate partner violence (IPV). Experiential avoidance following CEA may interfere with a person's ability to effectively problem solve in social situations, increasing risk for conflict and interpersonal violence. As part of a larger study, 232 women recruited from the community completed measures assessing childhood emotional, physical, and sexual abuse, experiential avoidance, maladaptive social problem solving, and IPV perpetration and victimization. Final trimmed models indicated that CEA was indirectly associated with IPV victimization and perpetration via experiential avoidance and Negative Problem Orientation (NPO) and Impulsivity/Carelessness Style (ICS) social problem solving strategies. Though CEA was related to an Avoidance Style (AS) social problem solving strategy, this strategy was not significantly associated with IPV victimization or perpetration. Experiential avoidance had both a direct and indirect effect, via NPO and ICS social problem solving, on IPV victimization and perpetration. Findings suggest that CEA may lead some women to avoid unwanted internal experiences, which may adversely impact their ability to effectively problem solve in social situations and increase IPV risk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Final trimmed path analytic model of direct and indirect relationships between childhood abuse, experiential avoidance, social problem solving, and physical IPV victimization.
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behavsci-05-00154-f002: Final trimmed path analytic model of direct and indirect relationships between childhood abuse, experiential avoidance, social problem solving, and physical IPV victimization.

Mentions: Similar path analyses were conducted for physical IPV victimization. Figure 2 presents the final trimmed model of childhood physical, emotional, and sexual abuse, experiential avoidance, and NPO, ICS, and AS social problem solving domains predicting physical IPV victimization. After examining the fully saturated model and the CRs associated with each path, the paths from childhood sexual and physical abuse to experiential avoidance (β = −0.04, CR = −0.45 and β = 0.00, CR = 0.02, respectively), childhood sexual abuse to NPO, AS, and ICS (β = −0.03, CR = −0.49, β = 0.03, CR = 0.38, and β = −0.01, CR = −0.10, respectively), childhood physical abuse to NPO (β = −0.04, CR = −0.52), childhood emotional and sexual abuse to physical IPV perpetration (β = −0.04, CR = −0.53 and β = 0.06, CR = 0.94, respectively), and AS to physical IPV perpetration (β = −0.01, CR = 0.09) were removed. The remaining paths that were retained within the model all had CRs above 1.80. The final model had a non-significant chi-square statistic, χ2 = 4.56, p = 0.95. Only childhood physical abuse and experiential avoidance were directly related to physical IPV victimization. Childhood emotional abuse was indirectly associated with physical IPV victimization via experiential avoidance, ICS, and NPO. Childhood sexual abuse was not directly or indirectly related to physical IPV victimization. Similar to the final trimmed model of physical IPV perpetration, childhood emotional abuse and experiential avoidance were associated with AS but AS was not significantly associated with physical IPV victimization.


The impact of childhood emotional abuse and experiential avoidance on maladaptive problem solving and intimate partner violence.

Bell KM, Higgins L - Behav Sci (Basel) (2015)

Final trimmed path analytic model of direct and indirect relationships between childhood abuse, experiential avoidance, social problem solving, and physical IPV victimization.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493441&req=5

behavsci-05-00154-f002: Final trimmed path analytic model of direct and indirect relationships between childhood abuse, experiential avoidance, social problem solving, and physical IPV victimization.
Mentions: Similar path analyses were conducted for physical IPV victimization. Figure 2 presents the final trimmed model of childhood physical, emotional, and sexual abuse, experiential avoidance, and NPO, ICS, and AS social problem solving domains predicting physical IPV victimization. After examining the fully saturated model and the CRs associated with each path, the paths from childhood sexual and physical abuse to experiential avoidance (β = −0.04, CR = −0.45 and β = 0.00, CR = 0.02, respectively), childhood sexual abuse to NPO, AS, and ICS (β = −0.03, CR = −0.49, β = 0.03, CR = 0.38, and β = −0.01, CR = −0.10, respectively), childhood physical abuse to NPO (β = −0.04, CR = −0.52), childhood emotional and sexual abuse to physical IPV perpetration (β = −0.04, CR = −0.53 and β = 0.06, CR = 0.94, respectively), and AS to physical IPV perpetration (β = −0.01, CR = 0.09) were removed. The remaining paths that were retained within the model all had CRs above 1.80. The final model had a non-significant chi-square statistic, χ2 = 4.56, p = 0.95. Only childhood physical abuse and experiential avoidance were directly related to physical IPV victimization. Childhood emotional abuse was indirectly associated with physical IPV victimization via experiential avoidance, ICS, and NPO. Childhood sexual abuse was not directly or indirectly related to physical IPV victimization. Similar to the final trimmed model of physical IPV perpetration, childhood emotional abuse and experiential avoidance were associated with AS but AS was not significantly associated with physical IPV victimization.

Bottom Line: The purpose of the current study was to examine the joint influences of experiential avoidance and social problem solving on the link between childhood emotional abuse (CEA) and intimate partner violence (IPV).Experiential avoidance following CEA may interfere with a person's ability to effectively problem solve in social situations, increasing risk for conflict and interpersonal violence.Findings suggest that CEA may lead some women to avoid unwanted internal experiences, which may adversely impact their ability to effectively problem solve in social situations and increase IPV risk.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Capital University, 1 College & Main, Columbus, OH 43209, USA. kbell626@capital.edu.

ABSTRACT
The purpose of the current study was to examine the joint influences of experiential avoidance and social problem solving on the link between childhood emotional abuse (CEA) and intimate partner violence (IPV). Experiential avoidance following CEA may interfere with a person's ability to effectively problem solve in social situations, increasing risk for conflict and interpersonal violence. As part of a larger study, 232 women recruited from the community completed measures assessing childhood emotional, physical, and sexual abuse, experiential avoidance, maladaptive social problem solving, and IPV perpetration and victimization. Final trimmed models indicated that CEA was indirectly associated with IPV victimization and perpetration via experiential avoidance and Negative Problem Orientation (NPO) and Impulsivity/Carelessness Style (ICS) social problem solving strategies. Though CEA was related to an Avoidance Style (AS) social problem solving strategy, this strategy was not significantly associated with IPV victimization or perpetration. Experiential avoidance had both a direct and indirect effect, via NPO and ICS social problem solving, on IPV victimization and perpetration. Findings suggest that CEA may lead some women to avoid unwanted internal experiences, which may adversely impact their ability to effectively problem solve in social situations and increase IPV risk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus