Limits...
Can we omit prophylactic inguinal nodal irradiation in anal cancer patients?

Kim H, Park HC, Yu JI, Choi DH, Ahn YC, Kim ST, Park JO, Park YS, Kim HC - Radiat Oncol J (2015)

Bottom Line: Among the survival, the median follow-up duration was 51 months (range, 12 to 218 months).The 5-year overall survival and PFS rates were 93.4% and 88.8%, respectively.Although none of the patients received inguinal node irradiation for prophylactic purposes, there was no inguinal recurrence.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To evaluate the appropriateness of prophylactic inguinal nodal irradiation (PINI), we analyzed patterns of failure in anal cancer patients who were inguinal node-negative at presentation and did not receive PINI.

Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 33 anal cancer patients treated by definitive concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) between 1994 and 2013. Radiotherapy consisted of a total dose of 44-45 Gy (22-25 fractions in 5 weeks) on the whole pelvis, anus, and perineum. Except inguinal lymphadenopathy was present at initial diagnosis, the entire inguinal chain was not included in the radiation field. In other words, there was no PINI.

Results: The median follow-up duration was 50 months (range, 4 to 218 months). Median survival and progression-free survival (PFS) were 57 months (range, 10 to 218 months) and 50 months (range, 4 to 218 months), respectively. Among the survival, the median follow-up duration was 51 months (range, 12 to 218 months). The 5-year overall survival and PFS rates were 93.4% and 88.8%, respectively. Although none of the patients received inguinal node irradiation for prophylactic purposes, there was no inguinal recurrence.

Conclusion: Treatment of anal cancer by omitting PINI might be considered in selected patients with clinically uninvolved inguinal nodes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Progression-free survival in patients with anal squamous cell carcinoma.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493432&req=5

Figure 3: Progression-free survival in patients with anal squamous cell carcinoma.

Mentions: The median follow-up duration was 50 months (range, 4 to 218 months). Among the survival, a median follow-up duration was 51 months (range, 12 to 218 months). Median survival and PFS were 57 months (range, 10 to 218 months) and 50 months (range, 4 to 218 months), respectively. The 5-year OS and PFS rates were 93.4% (Fig. 2) and 88.8% (Fig. 3), respectively.


Can we omit prophylactic inguinal nodal irradiation in anal cancer patients?

Kim H, Park HC, Yu JI, Choi DH, Ahn YC, Kim ST, Park JO, Park YS, Kim HC - Radiat Oncol J (2015)

Progression-free survival in patients with anal squamous cell carcinoma.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493432&req=5

Figure 3: Progression-free survival in patients with anal squamous cell carcinoma.
Mentions: The median follow-up duration was 50 months (range, 4 to 218 months). Among the survival, a median follow-up duration was 51 months (range, 12 to 218 months). Median survival and PFS were 57 months (range, 10 to 218 months) and 50 months (range, 4 to 218 months), respectively. The 5-year OS and PFS rates were 93.4% (Fig. 2) and 88.8% (Fig. 3), respectively.

Bottom Line: Among the survival, the median follow-up duration was 51 months (range, 12 to 218 months).The 5-year overall survival and PFS rates were 93.4% and 88.8%, respectively.Although none of the patients received inguinal node irradiation for prophylactic purposes, there was no inguinal recurrence.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To evaluate the appropriateness of prophylactic inguinal nodal irradiation (PINI), we analyzed patterns of failure in anal cancer patients who were inguinal node-negative at presentation and did not receive PINI.

Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 33 anal cancer patients treated by definitive concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) between 1994 and 2013. Radiotherapy consisted of a total dose of 44-45 Gy (22-25 fractions in 5 weeks) on the whole pelvis, anus, and perineum. Except inguinal lymphadenopathy was present at initial diagnosis, the entire inguinal chain was not included in the radiation field. In other words, there was no PINI.

Results: The median follow-up duration was 50 months (range, 4 to 218 months). Median survival and progression-free survival (PFS) were 57 months (range, 10 to 218 months) and 50 months (range, 4 to 218 months), respectively. Among the survival, the median follow-up duration was 51 months (range, 12 to 218 months). The 5-year overall survival and PFS rates were 93.4% and 88.8%, respectively. Although none of the patients received inguinal node irradiation for prophylactic purposes, there was no inguinal recurrence.

Conclusion: Treatment of anal cancer by omitting PINI might be considered in selected patients with clinically uninvolved inguinal nodes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus