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A first integrative study of the identity and origins of the British Dwarf Pill Millipede populations, Trachysphaera cf. lobata (Diplopoda, Glomerida, Glomeridae).

Wilbrandt J, Lee P, Read H, Wesener T - Biodivers Data J (2015)

Bottom Line: Albeit both British populations are genetically distant, they are closely related (1.9-2.5% p-distance) to French T.lobata, corroborating results of earlier studies.The only observed morphological characters constant within and different between species were the number of rows of sclerotized bacilli on the tergites, as well as the shape of the male and female anal shield.Both, barcoding and the morphological study identify the British Trachysphaera populations as T. lobata.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Zoological Research Museum Koenig, Bonn, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Three populations of the pill millipede genus Trachysphaera Heller 1858 are present in Great Britain, one on the Isle of Wight, one in South Wales and one in mid-Wales. To identify and characterize the British Trachysphaera populations, the intraspecific and interspecific variation of the populations in South Wales and on the Isle of Wight were studied and evaluated in a first integrative study of members of Trachysphaera, utilizing barcoding and SEM. DNA was extracted from 28 British Trachysphaera and 10 French T. lobata (Ribaut 1954) specimens, one each of French T. cf. drescoi (Conde and Demange 1961) and T. pyrenaica (Ribaut 1908), and one of Spanish T. cf. rousseti (Demange 1959); the barcoding fragment of the COI gene was amplified and their genetic intra- and interpopulation distances compared with one another using two Italian T. spp. and one Croatian T. schmidti Heller 1858 specimens as near outgroups. To compare the genetic distances with the morphological characters, 15 characters of a total of 13 British Trachysphaera, together with two specimens of T.pyrenaica, two T. cf. drescoi and one of T. cf. rousseti were imaged, using the same individuals utilized for DNA extraction. Albeit both British populations are genetically distant, they are closely related (1.9-2.5% p-distance) to French T.lobata, corroborating results of earlier studies. Between different Trachysphaera species, genetic distance was high (16.7-18.8%). The morphological study showed the non-reliability of key taxonomic characters in Trachysphaera, with genetically identical individuals exhibiting morphological variation, especially on the telopods. The only observed morphological characters constant within and different between species were the number of rows of sclerotized bacilli on the tergites, as well as the shape of the male and female anal shield. Both, barcoding and the morphological study identify the British Trachysphaera populations as T. lobata.

No MeSH data available.


anterior view (MBiID 852943)
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Figure 1493071: anterior view (MBiID 852943)

Mentions: The telopods of the studied Trachysphaera species show extensive variation between species, within species, within populations and even within the same individual (Figs 6, 7, 8). In T.lobata the male telopods show great differences in the shape of the femoral process, which is medially swollen in male TW14 (Fig. 6c), simply tapering in male TW12 (Fig. 6a) and with a special 'bump' in male TW21 (Fig. 7c), the latter being the only male specimen among the samples from Wales. Similar differences can be observed in the tibial process, which is barely visible in some T.lobata specimens from the Isle of Wight, but protruding in the single male from Wales (Fig. 7c, d). Even more pronounced are the differences between the left and right telopod of the T.pyrenaica male (GEU157). Here, the femoral process is triangular on the left telopod (Fig. 8c), while it is well-rounded, identical to those of T.lobata on the right telopod (Figs 6c, 8d). The differences between the left and right telopod are even more pronounced for the tibial process, which is well-developed and triangular on the left (Fig. 8c), but almost absent on the right telopod (Fig. 8d) of the same specimen.


A first integrative study of the identity and origins of the British Dwarf Pill Millipede populations, Trachysphaera cf. lobata (Diplopoda, Glomerida, Glomeridae).

Wilbrandt J, Lee P, Read H, Wesener T - Biodivers Data J (2015)

anterior view (MBiID 852943)
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons-attribution
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493372&req=5

Figure 1493071: anterior view (MBiID 852943)
Mentions: The telopods of the studied Trachysphaera species show extensive variation between species, within species, within populations and even within the same individual (Figs 6, 7, 8). In T.lobata the male telopods show great differences in the shape of the femoral process, which is medially swollen in male TW14 (Fig. 6c), simply tapering in male TW12 (Fig. 6a) and with a special 'bump' in male TW21 (Fig. 7c), the latter being the only male specimen among the samples from Wales. Similar differences can be observed in the tibial process, which is barely visible in some T.lobata specimens from the Isle of Wight, but protruding in the single male from Wales (Fig. 7c, d). Even more pronounced are the differences between the left and right telopod of the T.pyrenaica male (GEU157). Here, the femoral process is triangular on the left telopod (Fig. 8c), while it is well-rounded, identical to those of T.lobata on the right telopod (Figs 6c, 8d). The differences between the left and right telopod are even more pronounced for the tibial process, which is well-developed and triangular on the left (Fig. 8c), but almost absent on the right telopod (Fig. 8d) of the same specimen.

Bottom Line: Albeit both British populations are genetically distant, they are closely related (1.9-2.5% p-distance) to French T.lobata, corroborating results of earlier studies.The only observed morphological characters constant within and different between species were the number of rows of sclerotized bacilli on the tergites, as well as the shape of the male and female anal shield.Both, barcoding and the morphological study identify the British Trachysphaera populations as T. lobata.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Zoological Research Museum Koenig, Bonn, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Three populations of the pill millipede genus Trachysphaera Heller 1858 are present in Great Britain, one on the Isle of Wight, one in South Wales and one in mid-Wales. To identify and characterize the British Trachysphaera populations, the intraspecific and interspecific variation of the populations in South Wales and on the Isle of Wight were studied and evaluated in a first integrative study of members of Trachysphaera, utilizing barcoding and SEM. DNA was extracted from 28 British Trachysphaera and 10 French T. lobata (Ribaut 1954) specimens, one each of French T. cf. drescoi (Conde and Demange 1961) and T. pyrenaica (Ribaut 1908), and one of Spanish T. cf. rousseti (Demange 1959); the barcoding fragment of the COI gene was amplified and their genetic intra- and interpopulation distances compared with one another using two Italian T. spp. and one Croatian T. schmidti Heller 1858 specimens as near outgroups. To compare the genetic distances with the morphological characters, 15 characters of a total of 13 British Trachysphaera, together with two specimens of T.pyrenaica, two T. cf. drescoi and one of T. cf. rousseti were imaged, using the same individuals utilized for DNA extraction. Albeit both British populations are genetically distant, they are closely related (1.9-2.5% p-distance) to French T.lobata, corroborating results of earlier studies. Between different Trachysphaera species, genetic distance was high (16.7-18.8%). The morphological study showed the non-reliability of key taxonomic characters in Trachysphaera, with genetically identical individuals exhibiting morphological variation, especially on the telopods. The only observed morphological characters constant within and different between species were the number of rows of sclerotized bacilli on the tergites, as well as the shape of the male and female anal shield. Both, barcoding and the morphological study identify the British Trachysphaera populations as T. lobata.

No MeSH data available.