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Redescription of two subterranean amphipods Niphargusmolnari Méhely, 1927 and Niphargusgebhardti Schellenberg, 1934 (Amphipoda, Niphargidae) and their phylogenetic position.

Angyal D, Balázs G, Zakšek V, Krízsik V, Fišer C - Zookeys (2015)

Bottom Line: Using three independent molecular markers we showed that Niphargusgebhardti belongs to the clade distributed between Central and Eastern Europe, whereas phylogenetic relationship of Niphargusmolnari to the rest of Niphargus species is not clear.The two species from the Mecsek Mts. are phylogenetically not closely related.Both species need to be treated as vulnerable according to IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Zoology, Hungarian Natural History Museum, Baross u. 13, 1088 Budapest, Hungary ; Doctoral School of Animal-and Agricultural Environmental Sciences, Department of Animal Sciences and Animal Husbandry, Georgikon Faculty, University of Pannonia, Deák Ferenc u. 16, 8360 Keszthely, Hungary.

ABSTRACT
A detailed redescription of two endemic, cave-dwelling niphargid species of the Hungarian Mecsek Mts., Niphargusmolnari Méhely, 1927 and Niphargusgebhardti Schellenberg, 1934 is given based on newly collected material. Morphology was studied under light microscopy and with scanning electon microscopy. Morphological descriptions are complemented with mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) sequences as barcodes for both species and with notes on their ecology. Using three independent molecular markers we showed that Niphargusgebhardti belongs to the clade distributed between Central and Eastern Europe, whereas phylogenetic relationship of Niphargusmolnari to the rest of Niphargus species is not clear. The two species from the Mecsek Mts. are phylogenetically not closely related. Both species need to be treated as vulnerable according to IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

No MeSH data available.


Location of the Mecsek Mts. and the nearby isolated mountain ranges within Europe.
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Figure 1: Location of the Mecsek Mts. and the nearby isolated mountain ranges within Europe.

Mentions: Fragmented mountain areas in East-Central Europe had been suggested to be centres of endemisms that evolved through a complex geological history including Eocene marine regression-transgression cycles and Pleistocene glacial cycles (Hou et al. 2013, Meleg et al. 2013, Mamos et al. 2014). The Mecsek is one of these isolated mountain ranges, that is situated in Southern Hungary and surrounded by Pannonian plains. The closest mountain ranges are the Croatian Papuk Mts. (80 km) and the Hungarian Transdanubian Mts. (150 km) (Fig. 1). The area is small of approximately 545 km². In biological sense, it is populated by numerous endemic species the origin of which may date back to Tertiary and which therefore apparently have survived mass extinctions in glacial periods. The upper geological layers comprise of Triassic and Jurassic limestones and dolomites, where extensive karstification has created over 200 caves. The subterranean environment of the area harbours numerous terrestrial and aquatic highly endemic invertebrates, known only from one or a few caves. Although the region apparently harbours an important piece of European and Hungarian natural heritage, until now only one species, the Hungarian blind snail (Bythiospeumhungaricum (Soós, 1927)) has been protected by law. A serious impediment for conservation biology is that our knowledge of species is only limited, beginning with poor taxonomic descriptions. The aim of this study is to bridge this gap at the most basic level. We morphologically redescribe and present phylogenetic relationships of two amphipod species from the genus Niphargus, both endemic to this area.


Redescription of two subterranean amphipods Niphargusmolnari Méhely, 1927 and Niphargusgebhardti Schellenberg, 1934 (Amphipoda, Niphargidae) and their phylogenetic position.

Angyal D, Balázs G, Zakšek V, Krízsik V, Fišer C - Zookeys (2015)

Location of the Mecsek Mts. and the nearby isolated mountain ranges within Europe.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons-attribution
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493343&req=5

Figure 1: Location of the Mecsek Mts. and the nearby isolated mountain ranges within Europe.
Mentions: Fragmented mountain areas in East-Central Europe had been suggested to be centres of endemisms that evolved through a complex geological history including Eocene marine regression-transgression cycles and Pleistocene glacial cycles (Hou et al. 2013, Meleg et al. 2013, Mamos et al. 2014). The Mecsek is one of these isolated mountain ranges, that is situated in Southern Hungary and surrounded by Pannonian plains. The closest mountain ranges are the Croatian Papuk Mts. (80 km) and the Hungarian Transdanubian Mts. (150 km) (Fig. 1). The area is small of approximately 545 km². In biological sense, it is populated by numerous endemic species the origin of which may date back to Tertiary and which therefore apparently have survived mass extinctions in glacial periods. The upper geological layers comprise of Triassic and Jurassic limestones and dolomites, where extensive karstification has created over 200 caves. The subterranean environment of the area harbours numerous terrestrial and aquatic highly endemic invertebrates, known only from one or a few caves. Although the region apparently harbours an important piece of European and Hungarian natural heritage, until now only one species, the Hungarian blind snail (Bythiospeumhungaricum (Soós, 1927)) has been protected by law. A serious impediment for conservation biology is that our knowledge of species is only limited, beginning with poor taxonomic descriptions. The aim of this study is to bridge this gap at the most basic level. We morphologically redescribe and present phylogenetic relationships of two amphipod species from the genus Niphargus, both endemic to this area.

Bottom Line: Using three independent molecular markers we showed that Niphargusgebhardti belongs to the clade distributed between Central and Eastern Europe, whereas phylogenetic relationship of Niphargusmolnari to the rest of Niphargus species is not clear.The two species from the Mecsek Mts. are phylogenetically not closely related.Both species need to be treated as vulnerable according to IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Zoology, Hungarian Natural History Museum, Baross u. 13, 1088 Budapest, Hungary ; Doctoral School of Animal-and Agricultural Environmental Sciences, Department of Animal Sciences and Animal Husbandry, Georgikon Faculty, University of Pannonia, Deák Ferenc u. 16, 8360 Keszthely, Hungary.

ABSTRACT
A detailed redescription of two endemic, cave-dwelling niphargid species of the Hungarian Mecsek Mts., Niphargusmolnari Méhely, 1927 and Niphargusgebhardti Schellenberg, 1934 is given based on newly collected material. Morphology was studied under light microscopy and with scanning electon microscopy. Morphological descriptions are complemented with mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) sequences as barcodes for both species and with notes on their ecology. Using three independent molecular markers we showed that Niphargusgebhardti belongs to the clade distributed between Central and Eastern Europe, whereas phylogenetic relationship of Niphargusmolnari to the rest of Niphargus species is not clear. The two species from the Mecsek Mts. are phylogenetically not closely related. Both species need to be treated as vulnerable according to IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

No MeSH data available.