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Mixed-complexity artificial grammar learning in humans and macaque monkeys: evaluating learning strategies.

Wilson B, Smith K, Petkov CI - Eur. J. Neurosci. (2015)

Bottom Line: We found no significant sensitivity to the non-adjacent AG relationships in the macaques.The results suggest that humans and macaques are largely comparably sensitive to the adjacent AG relationships and their statistical properties.However, in the presence of multiple cues to grammaticality, the non-adjacent relationships are less salient to the macaques and many of the humans.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University, Henry Wellcome Building, Framlington Place, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE2 4HH, UK; Centre for Behaviour and Evolution, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.

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Details of macaque eye‐tracking approach. (A) Schematic of macaque eye‐tracking experiment, adapted from Wilson et al. (2013). (B) Average eye trace (± SEM) from an example session in one monkey. Values to the right of the vertical midline represent eye movements toward the audio speaker (left or right) that presented the test sequence. The 2 SD baseline (based on the variance in eye movements during the 2 s baseline period) is shown as a dashed line. The duration for which the eye position exceeded this threshold during the 5 s stimulus period (shaded area) was calculated.
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ejn12834-fig-0002: Details of macaque eye‐tracking approach. (A) Schematic of macaque eye‐tracking experiment, adapted from Wilson et al. (2013). (B) Average eye trace (± SEM) from an example session in one monkey. Values to the right of the vertical midline represent eye movements toward the audio speaker (left or right) that presented the test sequence. The 2 SD baseline (based on the variance in eye movements during the 2 s baseline period) is shown as a dashed line. The duration for which the eye position exceeded this threshold during the 5 s stimulus period (shaded area) was calculated.

Mentions: The experiment was performed in a customised sound‐attenuating chamber (IAC Acoustics). Animals were tested individually. The macaque was seated in a primate chair 60 cm in front of a computer monitor (which displayed a yellow fixation circle) and two audio speakers (Creative Inspire T10) horizontally positioned at ± 30° visual angle (Fig. 2A). During the testing phase of the experiment, stimulus sequences were presented from either the left or the right audio speaker while eye‐tracking data were recorded (220 Hz infra‐red eye‐tracker; Arrington Research; Fig. 2B). The sounds were presented using Cortex software (Salk Institute) at ~75 dB SPL (calibrated with an XL2 sound level meter; NTI Audio). For additional details of the eye‐tracking procedure, see Wilson et al. (2013).


Mixed-complexity artificial grammar learning in humans and macaque monkeys: evaluating learning strategies.

Wilson B, Smith K, Petkov CI - Eur. J. Neurosci. (2015)

Details of macaque eye‐tracking approach. (A) Schematic of macaque eye‐tracking experiment, adapted from Wilson et al. (2013). (B) Average eye trace (± SEM) from an example session in one monkey. Values to the right of the vertical midline represent eye movements toward the audio speaker (left or right) that presented the test sequence. The 2 SD baseline (based on the variance in eye movements during the 2 s baseline period) is shown as a dashed line. The duration for which the eye position exceeded this threshold during the 5 s stimulus period (shaded area) was calculated.
© Copyright Policy - creativeCommonsBy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493314&req=5

ejn12834-fig-0002: Details of macaque eye‐tracking approach. (A) Schematic of macaque eye‐tracking experiment, adapted from Wilson et al. (2013). (B) Average eye trace (± SEM) from an example session in one monkey. Values to the right of the vertical midline represent eye movements toward the audio speaker (left or right) that presented the test sequence. The 2 SD baseline (based on the variance in eye movements during the 2 s baseline period) is shown as a dashed line. The duration for which the eye position exceeded this threshold during the 5 s stimulus period (shaded area) was calculated.
Mentions: The experiment was performed in a customised sound‐attenuating chamber (IAC Acoustics). Animals were tested individually. The macaque was seated in a primate chair 60 cm in front of a computer monitor (which displayed a yellow fixation circle) and two audio speakers (Creative Inspire T10) horizontally positioned at ± 30° visual angle (Fig. 2A). During the testing phase of the experiment, stimulus sequences were presented from either the left or the right audio speaker while eye‐tracking data were recorded (220 Hz infra‐red eye‐tracker; Arrington Research; Fig. 2B). The sounds were presented using Cortex software (Salk Institute) at ~75 dB SPL (calibrated with an XL2 sound level meter; NTI Audio). For additional details of the eye‐tracking procedure, see Wilson et al. (2013).

Bottom Line: We found no significant sensitivity to the non-adjacent AG relationships in the macaques.The results suggest that humans and macaques are largely comparably sensitive to the adjacent AG relationships and their statistical properties.However, in the presence of multiple cues to grammaticality, the non-adjacent relationships are less salient to the macaques and many of the humans.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University, Henry Wellcome Building, Framlington Place, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE2 4HH, UK; Centre for Behaviour and Evolution, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus