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Arousal Predisposition as a Vulnerability Indicator for Psychosis: A General Population Online Stress Induction Study.

Clamor A, Warmuth AM, Lincoln TM - Schizophr Res Treatment (2015)

Bottom Line: The participants with an increased AP generally felt more stressed.However, AP was not associated with the specific stress-response.Further research is needed to clarify its predictive value for stress-responses.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, University of Hamburg, Von-Melle-Park 5, 20146 Hamburg, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Explanatory models ascribe to arousability a central role for the development of psychotic symptoms. Thus, a disposition to hyperarousal (i.e., increased arousal predisposition (AP)) may serve as an underlying vulnerability indicator for psychosis by interacting with stressors to cause symptoms. In this case, AP, stress-response, and psychotic symptoms should be linked before the development of a diagnosable psychotic disorder. We conducted a cross-sectional online study in a population sample (N = 104; M age = 27.7 years, SD = 11.2, range 18-70). Participants rated their AP and subclinical psychotic symptoms. Participants reported their stress-levels before and after two stress inductions including an arithmetic and a social stressor. The participants with an increased AP generally felt more stressed. However, AP was not associated with the specific stress-response. As expected, positive psychotic symptoms were significantly associated with AP, but this was not mediated by general stress-levels. Its association to subtle, nonclinical psychotic symptoms supports our assumption that AP could be a vulnerability indicator for psychosis. The trait is easily accessible via a short self-report and could facilitate the identification of people at risk and be a promising target for early stress-management. Further research is needed to clarify its predictive value for stress-responses.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Repeated-measures ANOVA for stress-response in low versus high APS groups. APS: Arousal Predisposition Scale; VAS: visual analogue stress scales.
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fig3: Repeated-measures ANOVA for stress-response in low versus high APS groups. APS: Arousal Predisposition Scale; VAS: visual analogue stress scales.

Mentions: The repeated-measures ANOVAs for the arithmetic stressor showed a significant main effect of group, F(1, 64) = 14.67, p < .001, and η2p = .186, with APSlow revealing lower general stress estimates than APShigh. Similarly, for the social stressor, a main effect of group was found, F(1,64) = 25.33, p < .001, and η2p = .284, confirming hypothesis (1a) (see Figure 3).


Arousal Predisposition as a Vulnerability Indicator for Psychosis: A General Population Online Stress Induction Study.

Clamor A, Warmuth AM, Lincoln TM - Schizophr Res Treatment (2015)

Repeated-measures ANOVA for stress-response in low versus high APS groups. APS: Arousal Predisposition Scale; VAS: visual analogue stress scales.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493307&req=5

fig3: Repeated-measures ANOVA for stress-response in low versus high APS groups. APS: Arousal Predisposition Scale; VAS: visual analogue stress scales.
Mentions: The repeated-measures ANOVAs for the arithmetic stressor showed a significant main effect of group, F(1, 64) = 14.67, p < .001, and η2p = .186, with APSlow revealing lower general stress estimates than APShigh. Similarly, for the social stressor, a main effect of group was found, F(1,64) = 25.33, p < .001, and η2p = .284, confirming hypothesis (1a) (see Figure 3).

Bottom Line: The participants with an increased AP generally felt more stressed.However, AP was not associated with the specific stress-response.Further research is needed to clarify its predictive value for stress-responses.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, University of Hamburg, Von-Melle-Park 5, 20146 Hamburg, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Explanatory models ascribe to arousability a central role for the development of psychotic symptoms. Thus, a disposition to hyperarousal (i.e., increased arousal predisposition (AP)) may serve as an underlying vulnerability indicator for psychosis by interacting with stressors to cause symptoms. In this case, AP, stress-response, and psychotic symptoms should be linked before the development of a diagnosable psychotic disorder. We conducted a cross-sectional online study in a population sample (N = 104; M age = 27.7 years, SD = 11.2, range 18-70). Participants rated their AP and subclinical psychotic symptoms. Participants reported their stress-levels before and after two stress inductions including an arithmetic and a social stressor. The participants with an increased AP generally felt more stressed. However, AP was not associated with the specific stress-response. As expected, positive psychotic symptoms were significantly associated with AP, but this was not mediated by general stress-levels. Its association to subtle, nonclinical psychotic symptoms supports our assumption that AP could be a vulnerability indicator for psychosis. The trait is easily accessible via a short self-report and could facilitate the identification of people at risk and be a promising target for early stress-management. Further research is needed to clarify its predictive value for stress-responses.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus