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Arousal Predisposition as a Vulnerability Indicator for Psychosis: A General Population Online Stress Induction Study.

Clamor A, Warmuth AM, Lincoln TM - Schizophr Res Treatment (2015)

Bottom Line: The participants with an increased AP generally felt more stressed.However, AP was not associated with the specific stress-response.Further research is needed to clarify its predictive value for stress-responses.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, University of Hamburg, Von-Melle-Park 5, 20146 Hamburg, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Explanatory models ascribe to arousability a central role for the development of psychotic symptoms. Thus, a disposition to hyperarousal (i.e., increased arousal predisposition (AP)) may serve as an underlying vulnerability indicator for psychosis by interacting with stressors to cause symptoms. In this case, AP, stress-response, and psychotic symptoms should be linked before the development of a diagnosable psychotic disorder. We conducted a cross-sectional online study in a population sample (N = 104; M age = 27.7 years, SD = 11.2, range 18-70). Participants rated their AP and subclinical psychotic symptoms. Participants reported their stress-levels before and after two stress inductions including an arithmetic and a social stressor. The participants with an increased AP generally felt more stressed. However, AP was not associated with the specific stress-response. As expected, positive psychotic symptoms were significantly associated with AP, but this was not mediated by general stress-levels. Its association to subtle, nonclinical psychotic symptoms supports our assumption that AP could be a vulnerability indicator for psychosis. The trait is easily accessible via a short self-report and could facilitate the identification of people at risk and be a promising target for early stress-management. Further research is needed to clarify its predictive value for stress-responses.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Graphical depiction of the hypotheses.
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fig1: Graphical depiction of the hypotheses.

Mentions: Thus, we expect individuals without a psychotic disorder but with high AP to (1a) report higher general levels of stress and (1b) show an increased response to discrete stressors (i.e., stress-response) compared to individuals with low AP. Furthermore, if AP constitutes a vulnerability factor for psychotic symptoms, we expect that (2) AP will be positively associated with the extent of subclinical psychotic symptoms. Finally, we hypothesize that the association of AP with symptoms is mediated by general levels of self-reported stress (3a) and the stress-responses (3b; see Figure 1).


Arousal Predisposition as a Vulnerability Indicator for Psychosis: A General Population Online Stress Induction Study.

Clamor A, Warmuth AM, Lincoln TM - Schizophr Res Treatment (2015)

Graphical depiction of the hypotheses.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493307&req=5

fig1: Graphical depiction of the hypotheses.
Mentions: Thus, we expect individuals without a psychotic disorder but with high AP to (1a) report higher general levels of stress and (1b) show an increased response to discrete stressors (i.e., stress-response) compared to individuals with low AP. Furthermore, if AP constitutes a vulnerability factor for psychotic symptoms, we expect that (2) AP will be positively associated with the extent of subclinical psychotic symptoms. Finally, we hypothesize that the association of AP with symptoms is mediated by general levels of self-reported stress (3a) and the stress-responses (3b; see Figure 1).

Bottom Line: The participants with an increased AP generally felt more stressed.However, AP was not associated with the specific stress-response.Further research is needed to clarify its predictive value for stress-responses.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, University of Hamburg, Von-Melle-Park 5, 20146 Hamburg, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Explanatory models ascribe to arousability a central role for the development of psychotic symptoms. Thus, a disposition to hyperarousal (i.e., increased arousal predisposition (AP)) may serve as an underlying vulnerability indicator for psychosis by interacting with stressors to cause symptoms. In this case, AP, stress-response, and psychotic symptoms should be linked before the development of a diagnosable psychotic disorder. We conducted a cross-sectional online study in a population sample (N = 104; M age = 27.7 years, SD = 11.2, range 18-70). Participants rated their AP and subclinical psychotic symptoms. Participants reported their stress-levels before and after two stress inductions including an arithmetic and a social stressor. The participants with an increased AP generally felt more stressed. However, AP was not associated with the specific stress-response. As expected, positive psychotic symptoms were significantly associated with AP, but this was not mediated by general stress-levels. Its association to subtle, nonclinical psychotic symptoms supports our assumption that AP could be a vulnerability indicator for psychosis. The trait is easily accessible via a short self-report and could facilitate the identification of people at risk and be a promising target for early stress-management. Further research is needed to clarify its predictive value for stress-responses.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus