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Gold Nanoparticles Promote Oxidant-Mediated Activation of NF-κB and 53BP1 Recruitment-Based Adaptive Response in Human Astrocytes.

Mytych J, Lewinska A, Zebrowski J, Wnuk M - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Bottom Line: In contrast, nanogold provoked changes in the astrocyte cell cycle and induced senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity.The robust 53BP1 recruitment resulted in reduced micronuclei production.Thus, nanogold treatment stimulated an adaptive response in a human astrocyte cell.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Genetics, University of Rzeszow, Rejtana 16C, 35-959 Rzeszow, Poland.

ABSTRACT
Nanogold-based materials are promising candidate tools for nanobased medicine. Nevertheless, no conclusive information on their cytotoxicity is available. In the present study, we investigated the effects of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on human astrocytes in vitro. Nanogold treatment in a wide range of concentrations did not result in cytotoxicity. In contrast, nanogold provoked changes in the astrocyte cell cycle and induced senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity. AuNPs promoted oxidative stress and caused activation of NF-κB pathway. After nanogold treatment, an inverse correlation between the formation of 53BP1 foci and micronuclei generation was observed. The robust 53BP1 recruitment resulted in reduced micronuclei production. Thus, nanogold treatment stimulated an adaptive response in a human astrocyte cell.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Characteristics of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) using atomic force microscopy (AFM). (a) Representative height sensor image of AuNPs deposited on nonfunctionalized mica showing their diversity in size and lack of the tendency for particle agglomeration in water suspension. (b) Typical shape of a gold nanoparticle obtained in Peak Force mode at high-resolution imaging (the particle height equal to c. 9.5 nm). (c) A height profile of an individual AuNP used for determination of the particle size. (d) The distribution of nanoparticle size.
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fig1: Characteristics of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) using atomic force microscopy (AFM). (a) Representative height sensor image of AuNPs deposited on nonfunctionalized mica showing their diversity in size and lack of the tendency for particle agglomeration in water suspension. (b) Typical shape of a gold nanoparticle obtained in Peak Force mode at high-resolution imaging (the particle height equal to c. 9.5 nm). (c) A height profile of an individual AuNP used for determination of the particle size. (d) The distribution of nanoparticle size.

Mentions: As gold nanoparticles were commercially purchased, AuNPs were characterized for selected physical properties before the analysis of their effects on human astrocytes. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging showed that AuNPs suspended in water were capable of dispersing on mica substrate without tendency for agglomerating (Figure 1(a)). This property was likely to be associated to some extent with commercial functionalizing of the AuNP with polyethylene glycol (PEG).


Gold Nanoparticles Promote Oxidant-Mediated Activation of NF-κB and 53BP1 Recruitment-Based Adaptive Response in Human Astrocytes.

Mytych J, Lewinska A, Zebrowski J, Wnuk M - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Characteristics of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) using atomic force microscopy (AFM). (a) Representative height sensor image of AuNPs deposited on nonfunctionalized mica showing their diversity in size and lack of the tendency for particle agglomeration in water suspension. (b) Typical shape of a gold nanoparticle obtained in Peak Force mode at high-resolution imaging (the particle height equal to c. 9.5 nm). (c) A height profile of an individual AuNP used for determination of the particle size. (d) The distribution of nanoparticle size.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493286&req=5

fig1: Characteristics of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) using atomic force microscopy (AFM). (a) Representative height sensor image of AuNPs deposited on nonfunctionalized mica showing their diversity in size and lack of the tendency for particle agglomeration in water suspension. (b) Typical shape of a gold nanoparticle obtained in Peak Force mode at high-resolution imaging (the particle height equal to c. 9.5 nm). (c) A height profile of an individual AuNP used for determination of the particle size. (d) The distribution of nanoparticle size.
Mentions: As gold nanoparticles were commercially purchased, AuNPs were characterized for selected physical properties before the analysis of their effects on human astrocytes. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging showed that AuNPs suspended in water were capable of dispersing on mica substrate without tendency for agglomerating (Figure 1(a)). This property was likely to be associated to some extent with commercial functionalizing of the AuNP with polyethylene glycol (PEG).

Bottom Line: In contrast, nanogold provoked changes in the astrocyte cell cycle and induced senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity.The robust 53BP1 recruitment resulted in reduced micronuclei production.Thus, nanogold treatment stimulated an adaptive response in a human astrocyte cell.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Genetics, University of Rzeszow, Rejtana 16C, 35-959 Rzeszow, Poland.

ABSTRACT
Nanogold-based materials are promising candidate tools for nanobased medicine. Nevertheless, no conclusive information on their cytotoxicity is available. In the present study, we investigated the effects of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on human astrocytes in vitro. Nanogold treatment in a wide range of concentrations did not result in cytotoxicity. In contrast, nanogold provoked changes in the astrocyte cell cycle and induced senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity. AuNPs promoted oxidative stress and caused activation of NF-κB pathway. After nanogold treatment, an inverse correlation between the formation of 53BP1 foci and micronuclei generation was observed. The robust 53BP1 recruitment resulted in reduced micronuclei production. Thus, nanogold treatment stimulated an adaptive response in a human astrocyte cell.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus