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The Thermal Sensitivity Test in Evaluating Outcome after Peripheral Nerve Injury.

Ceynowa M, Mazurek T, Pankowski R, Rocławski M, Treder M - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Bottom Line: However, some patients who did regain the ability to differentiate temperatures correctly did not have any measurable return of hand function in other tests.Thermal discrimination scores correlated similarly with different functional scores, except for vibration sensibility, which did not show any significant correlation.The development and severity of cold intolerance seem to be unrelated to temperature sense.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Medical University of Gdańsk, Ulica Nowe Ogrody 1-6, 80-803 Gdańsk, Poland.

ABSTRACT
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability to discriminate temperatures in patients following peripheral nerve injury. Knowing that temperature sensibility is mediated by different receptors, the scores were compared to other functional hand scores in order to determine whether the ability to discriminate temperatures is restored to a different extent compared with other commonly evaluated hand function modalities. The test was performed using the NTE-2 device (Physitemp Instruments Inc., 154 Huron Avenue, Clifton, New Jersey, USA). Out of 57 patients, 27 had normal thermal discrimination scores, and 9 could not tell the temperatures apart in the differences set on the measuring device. Overall, patients with better thermal discrimination had also better hand function as evaluated with different methods. However, some patients who did regain the ability to differentiate temperatures correctly did not have any measurable return of hand function in other tests. Thermal discrimination scores correlated similarly with different functional scores, except for vibration sensibility, which did not show any significant correlation. The development and severity of cold intolerance seem to be unrelated to temperature sense.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean functional scores in groups according to temperature scores. 1: mean Rosén-Lundborg score. 2: mean cold intolerance score. 3: mean static 2-point discrimination test. 4: mean Semmes-Weinstein monofilament test score. 5: mean DASH score (the lower the score, the better the result) (all scores are given in percentages for clarity).
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fig1: Mean functional scores in groups according to temperature scores. 1: mean Rosén-Lundborg score. 2: mean cold intolerance score. 3: mean static 2-point discrimination test. 4: mean Semmes-Weinstein monofilament test score. 5: mean DASH score (the lower the score, the better the result) (all scores are given in percentages for clarity).

Mentions: Overall, patients with better thermal sensitivity scores had better results in other functional scores (Figure 1). Some patients who did regain the ability to differentiate temperatures correctly did not have any measurable return of hand function in other tests (Table 4). The thermal sensitivity test scores correlated positively with other functional scores, indicating that patients with poor thermal sensitivity scores scored also poor in other functional scores (Table 5). As seen from Table 5, temperature scores correlated similarly with different functional scores, except for vibration sensibility, which did not show any significant correlation. The correlations of the DASH questionnaire and hand function tests are shown in Table 6. To allow comparisons with other studies, the results of primary versus secondary repair are given in Table 7.


The Thermal Sensitivity Test in Evaluating Outcome after Peripheral Nerve Injury.

Ceynowa M, Mazurek T, Pankowski R, Rocławski M, Treder M - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Mean functional scores in groups according to temperature scores. 1: mean Rosén-Lundborg score. 2: mean cold intolerance score. 3: mean static 2-point discrimination test. 4: mean Semmes-Weinstein monofilament test score. 5: mean DASH score (the lower the score, the better the result) (all scores are given in percentages for clarity).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493271&req=5

fig1: Mean functional scores in groups according to temperature scores. 1: mean Rosén-Lundborg score. 2: mean cold intolerance score. 3: mean static 2-point discrimination test. 4: mean Semmes-Weinstein monofilament test score. 5: mean DASH score (the lower the score, the better the result) (all scores are given in percentages for clarity).
Mentions: Overall, patients with better thermal sensitivity scores had better results in other functional scores (Figure 1). Some patients who did regain the ability to differentiate temperatures correctly did not have any measurable return of hand function in other tests (Table 4). The thermal sensitivity test scores correlated positively with other functional scores, indicating that patients with poor thermal sensitivity scores scored also poor in other functional scores (Table 5). As seen from Table 5, temperature scores correlated similarly with different functional scores, except for vibration sensibility, which did not show any significant correlation. The correlations of the DASH questionnaire and hand function tests are shown in Table 6. To allow comparisons with other studies, the results of primary versus secondary repair are given in Table 7.

Bottom Line: However, some patients who did regain the ability to differentiate temperatures correctly did not have any measurable return of hand function in other tests.Thermal discrimination scores correlated similarly with different functional scores, except for vibration sensibility, which did not show any significant correlation.The development and severity of cold intolerance seem to be unrelated to temperature sense.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Medical University of Gdańsk, Ulica Nowe Ogrody 1-6, 80-803 Gdańsk, Poland.

ABSTRACT
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability to discriminate temperatures in patients following peripheral nerve injury. Knowing that temperature sensibility is mediated by different receptors, the scores were compared to other functional hand scores in order to determine whether the ability to discriminate temperatures is restored to a different extent compared with other commonly evaluated hand function modalities. The test was performed using the NTE-2 device (Physitemp Instruments Inc., 154 Huron Avenue, Clifton, New Jersey, USA). Out of 57 patients, 27 had normal thermal discrimination scores, and 9 could not tell the temperatures apart in the differences set on the measuring device. Overall, patients with better thermal discrimination had also better hand function as evaluated with different methods. However, some patients who did regain the ability to differentiate temperatures correctly did not have any measurable return of hand function in other tests. Thermal discrimination scores correlated similarly with different functional scores, except for vibration sensibility, which did not show any significant correlation. The development and severity of cold intolerance seem to be unrelated to temperature sense.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus