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Proprioceptive precision is impaired in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

Clayton HA, Jones SA, Henriques DY - Springerplus (2015)

Bottom Line: We recently found that EDS patients were less precise than healthy controls when estimating their felt hand's position relative to visible peripheral reference locations, and that this deficit was positively correlated with the severity of joint hypermobility.We further explore proprioceptive abilities in EDS by having patients localize their non-dominant left hand at a greater number of workspace locations than in our previous study.We found that, although patients were just as accurate as controls, they were not as precise.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Vision Research, York University, Toronto, Canada ; Department of Psychology, York University, Toronto, Canada.

ABSTRACT
It has been suggested that people with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), or other similar connective tissue disorders, may have proprioceptive impairments, the reason for which is still unknown. We recently found that EDS patients were less precise than healthy controls when estimating their felt hand's position relative to visible peripheral reference locations, and that this deficit was positively correlated with the severity of joint hypermobility. We further explore proprioceptive abilities in EDS by having patients localize their non-dominant left hand at a greater number of workspace locations than in our previous study. Additionally, we explore the relationship between chronic pain and proprioceptive sensitivity. We found that, although patients were just as accurate as controls, they were not as precise. Patients showed twice as much scatter than controls at all locations, but the degree of scatter did not positively correlate with chronic pain scores. This further supports the idea that a proprioceptive impairment pertaining to precision is present in EDS, but may not relate to the magnitude of chronic pain.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

a Average horizontal and sagittal reach endpoint errors. Error bars reflect standard error of the mean. b Average two-dimensional errors (centre of ellipses, represented by circles) and precision of reach endpoints (95% error ellipses) at each target-hand position (X’s), for EDS patients (dashed) and healthy controls (solid). c Mean elliptical areas (cm2) collapsed across all hand-target locations. Error bars reflect standard error of the mean. d Mean axis length (cm) for the major, minor and summed axes. Error bars reflect standard error of the mean.
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Fig1: a Average horizontal and sagittal reach endpoint errors. Error bars reflect standard error of the mean. b Average two-dimensional errors (centre of ellipses, represented by circles) and precision of reach endpoints (95% error ellipses) at each target-hand position (X’s), for EDS patients (dashed) and healthy controls (solid). c Mean elliptical areas (cm2) collapsed across all hand-target locations. Error bars reflect standard error of the mean. d Mean axis length (cm) for the major, minor and summed axes. Error bars reflect standard error of the mean.

Mentions: The bars in Figure 1a show that for both the EDS and control groups, subjects’ reach endpoints were quite accurate; reaches fell within 2 cm of the actual target-hand locations. Errors in proprioceptive localization for both groups are also depicted in Figure 1b as circles (mean endpoints) within the ellipses, relative to the “X” representing the location of the proprioceptive target. Horizontal errors were similar for both EDS (striped bars in Figure 1a; dashed circles in Figure 1b) and control subjects (solid bars and circles) [F(1, 20) = 2.50, p = 0.13], as were errors along the sagittal direction [F(1, 20) = 1.41, p = 0.25], and absolute displacement errors [F(1, 20) = 1.61, p = 0.22]. An interaction between group and (horizontal) target location revealed that leftward errors for left targets, and rightward errors for right targets, were larger for controls than EDS participants (whose reaches were shifted to the left for all targets) [F(1.15, 22.92) = 5.71, p = 0.022]. For sagittal errors, both groups tended to underestimate the distance of far proprioceptive targets, but not closer targets [F(1, 20) = 28.61, p < 0.001]. These results can be seen by comparing the circles in each ellipse to the “X”’s in Figure 1b.Figure 1


Proprioceptive precision is impaired in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

Clayton HA, Jones SA, Henriques DY - Springerplus (2015)

a Average horizontal and sagittal reach endpoint errors. Error bars reflect standard error of the mean. b Average two-dimensional errors (centre of ellipses, represented by circles) and precision of reach endpoints (95% error ellipses) at each target-hand position (X’s), for EDS patients (dashed) and healthy controls (solid). c Mean elliptical areas (cm2) collapsed across all hand-target locations. Error bars reflect standard error of the mean. d Mean axis length (cm) for the major, minor and summed axes. Error bars reflect standard error of the mean.
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493259&req=5

Fig1: a Average horizontal and sagittal reach endpoint errors. Error bars reflect standard error of the mean. b Average two-dimensional errors (centre of ellipses, represented by circles) and precision of reach endpoints (95% error ellipses) at each target-hand position (X’s), for EDS patients (dashed) and healthy controls (solid). c Mean elliptical areas (cm2) collapsed across all hand-target locations. Error bars reflect standard error of the mean. d Mean axis length (cm) for the major, minor and summed axes. Error bars reflect standard error of the mean.
Mentions: The bars in Figure 1a show that for both the EDS and control groups, subjects’ reach endpoints were quite accurate; reaches fell within 2 cm of the actual target-hand locations. Errors in proprioceptive localization for both groups are also depicted in Figure 1b as circles (mean endpoints) within the ellipses, relative to the “X” representing the location of the proprioceptive target. Horizontal errors were similar for both EDS (striped bars in Figure 1a; dashed circles in Figure 1b) and control subjects (solid bars and circles) [F(1, 20) = 2.50, p = 0.13], as were errors along the sagittal direction [F(1, 20) = 1.41, p = 0.25], and absolute displacement errors [F(1, 20) = 1.61, p = 0.22]. An interaction between group and (horizontal) target location revealed that leftward errors for left targets, and rightward errors for right targets, were larger for controls than EDS participants (whose reaches were shifted to the left for all targets) [F(1.15, 22.92) = 5.71, p = 0.022]. For sagittal errors, both groups tended to underestimate the distance of far proprioceptive targets, but not closer targets [F(1, 20) = 28.61, p < 0.001]. These results can be seen by comparing the circles in each ellipse to the “X”’s in Figure 1b.Figure 1

Bottom Line: We recently found that EDS patients were less precise than healthy controls when estimating their felt hand's position relative to visible peripheral reference locations, and that this deficit was positively correlated with the severity of joint hypermobility.We further explore proprioceptive abilities in EDS by having patients localize their non-dominant left hand at a greater number of workspace locations than in our previous study.We found that, although patients were just as accurate as controls, they were not as precise.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Vision Research, York University, Toronto, Canada ; Department of Psychology, York University, Toronto, Canada.

ABSTRACT
It has been suggested that people with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), or other similar connective tissue disorders, may have proprioceptive impairments, the reason for which is still unknown. We recently found that EDS patients were less precise than healthy controls when estimating their felt hand's position relative to visible peripheral reference locations, and that this deficit was positively correlated with the severity of joint hypermobility. We further explore proprioceptive abilities in EDS by having patients localize their non-dominant left hand at a greater number of workspace locations than in our previous study. Additionally, we explore the relationship between chronic pain and proprioceptive sensitivity. We found that, although patients were just as accurate as controls, they were not as precise. Patients showed twice as much scatter than controls at all locations, but the degree of scatter did not positively correlate with chronic pain scores. This further supports the idea that a proprioceptive impairment pertaining to precision is present in EDS, but may not relate to the magnitude of chronic pain.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus