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Characteristics of Pediatric Pancreatitis on Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreatography.

Hwang JY, Yoon HK, Kim KM - Pediatr Gastroenterol Hepatol Nutr (2015)

Bottom Line: Pediatric pancreatitis is not uncommon and results in considerable morbidity and mortality in the affected children.Unlike adults, pediatric pancreatitis is more frequently associated with underlying structural abnormalities, trauma, and drugs rather than an idiopathic etiology.This article focuses on MRCP findings associated with various causes of pancreatitis in children, particularly structural abnormalities of the pancreaticobiliary system, as well as describing the feasibility, limitations, and solutions associated with pediatric MRCP.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. ; Department of Radiology, Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Yangsan, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Pediatric pancreatitis is not uncommon and results in considerable morbidity and mortality in the affected children. Unlike adults, pediatric pancreatitis is more frequently associated with underlying structural abnormalities, trauma, and drugs rather than an idiopathic etiology. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) is a good imaging modality for evaluating pancreatitis and determining etiology without exposure to radiation. This article focuses on MRCP findings associated with various causes of pancreatitis in children, particularly structural abnormalities of the pancreaticobiliary system, as well as describing the feasibility, limitations, and solutions associated with pediatric MRCP.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Elimination of the obscuring structures. (A) Single-shot, 50-mm-thick radial acquisition with relaxation enhancement (RARE) image showing the obscured pancreaticobiliary system due to the presence of fluid in the stomach (arrow). (B, C) Single-shot, 20 mm-thick RARE image and maximum intensity projection 3-dimensional magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography image showing the eliminated signal due to unnecessary fluids.
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Figure 15: Elimination of the obscuring structures. (A) Single-shot, 50-mm-thick radial acquisition with relaxation enhancement (RARE) image showing the obscured pancreaticobiliary system due to the presence of fluid in the stomach (arrow). (B, C) Single-shot, 20 mm-thick RARE image and maximum intensity projection 3-dimensional magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography image showing the eliminated signal due to unnecessary fluids.

Mentions: Fluid in the stomach, duodenum, small and large intestines, kidneys, and the cerebrospinal fluid in the spinal canal can be identified on MRCP (Fig. 12B and 15A). Pathological conditions such as a large number of ascites, periportal and peripancreatic fluid collections, and distended gallbladder also affect the visibility of the pancreatic duct. Such fluid can be reduced by fasting, choosing adequate slab thickness depending on the patient's body habitus (Fig. 15B), 3D sequencing with postprocessing (Fig. 15C), and administering negative oral contrast media such as ferumoxil oral suspension, ferric ammonium citrate, or pineapple juice [1032353839].


Characteristics of Pediatric Pancreatitis on Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreatography.

Hwang JY, Yoon HK, Kim KM - Pediatr Gastroenterol Hepatol Nutr (2015)

Elimination of the obscuring structures. (A) Single-shot, 50-mm-thick radial acquisition with relaxation enhancement (RARE) image showing the obscured pancreaticobiliary system due to the presence of fluid in the stomach (arrow). (B, C) Single-shot, 20 mm-thick RARE image and maximum intensity projection 3-dimensional magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography image showing the eliminated signal due to unnecessary fluids.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493250&req=5

Figure 15: Elimination of the obscuring structures. (A) Single-shot, 50-mm-thick radial acquisition with relaxation enhancement (RARE) image showing the obscured pancreaticobiliary system due to the presence of fluid in the stomach (arrow). (B, C) Single-shot, 20 mm-thick RARE image and maximum intensity projection 3-dimensional magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography image showing the eliminated signal due to unnecessary fluids.
Mentions: Fluid in the stomach, duodenum, small and large intestines, kidneys, and the cerebrospinal fluid in the spinal canal can be identified on MRCP (Fig. 12B and 15A). Pathological conditions such as a large number of ascites, periportal and peripancreatic fluid collections, and distended gallbladder also affect the visibility of the pancreatic duct. Such fluid can be reduced by fasting, choosing adequate slab thickness depending on the patient's body habitus (Fig. 15B), 3D sequencing with postprocessing (Fig. 15C), and administering negative oral contrast media such as ferumoxil oral suspension, ferric ammonium citrate, or pineapple juice [1032353839].

Bottom Line: Pediatric pancreatitis is not uncommon and results in considerable morbidity and mortality in the affected children.Unlike adults, pediatric pancreatitis is more frequently associated with underlying structural abnormalities, trauma, and drugs rather than an idiopathic etiology.This article focuses on MRCP findings associated with various causes of pancreatitis in children, particularly structural abnormalities of the pancreaticobiliary system, as well as describing the feasibility, limitations, and solutions associated with pediatric MRCP.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. ; Department of Radiology, Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Yangsan, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Pediatric pancreatitis is not uncommon and results in considerable morbidity and mortality in the affected children. Unlike adults, pediatric pancreatitis is more frequently associated with underlying structural abnormalities, trauma, and drugs rather than an idiopathic etiology. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) is a good imaging modality for evaluating pancreatitis and determining etiology without exposure to radiation. This article focuses on MRCP findings associated with various causes of pancreatitis in children, particularly structural abnormalities of the pancreaticobiliary system, as well as describing the feasibility, limitations, and solutions associated with pediatric MRCP.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus