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Modeling Honey Bee Populations.

Torres DJ, Ricoy UM, Roybal S - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Understanding the recent decline in honey bee colonies hinges on understanding the factors that impact each of these different age castes.Subsequently, we study transient bee population dynamics by building upon the modeling foundation established by Schmickl and Crailsheim and Khoury et al.We also conduct sensitivity studies and show the effects of parameter variations on the colony population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mathematics and Physical Science, Northern New Mexico College, Espanola, NM, USA.

ABSTRACT
Eusocial honey bee populations (Apis mellifera) employ an age stratification organization of egg, larvae, pupae, hive bees and foraging bees. Understanding the recent decline in honey bee colonies hinges on understanding the factors that impact each of these different age castes. We first perform an analysis of steady state bee populations given mortality rates within each bee caste and find that the honey bee colony is highly susceptible to hive and pupae mortality rates. Subsequently, we study transient bee population dynamics by building upon the modeling foundation established by Schmickl and Crailsheim and Khoury et al. Our transient model based on differential equations accounts for the effects of pheromones in slowing the maturation of hive bees to foraging bees, the increased mortality of larvae in the absence of sufficient hive bees, and the effects of food scarcity. We also conduct sensitivity studies and show the effects of parameter variations on the colony population.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Model comparison of brood with experimental data.
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pone.0130966.g010: Model comparison of brood with experimental data.

Mentions: We extract experimental data from Fig 3a and 3b from Schmickl and Crailsheim [13] to construct two figures. Fig 9 compares our model with experimental population of adult bees from sources Omholt [37], Fukuda [38], and Bühlmann [39]. Schmickl and Crailsheim normalize the experimental data because the experimental data was collected for different sizes of honey bee colonies. Fig 10 compares our model with the experimental brood population from sources Bretschko [40], Bodenheimer [41] and Kunert and Crailsheim [42]. Our model colony seems to lie within the range of variability of experimental data, although our brood size peak seems high and our adult bee size peak seems low. Becher et al. [14] also compare their model with the empirical data from [37–39]. They also include brood cell data from Imdorf et al. [43] who show that the number of brood cells peaks between 23,000 to 34,000. We acknowledge that the dynamics of experimental bee populations will depend on the geographical location and length of the foraging season [7].


Modeling Honey Bee Populations.

Torres DJ, Ricoy UM, Roybal S - PLoS ONE (2015)

Model comparison of brood with experimental data.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493160&req=5

pone.0130966.g010: Model comparison of brood with experimental data.
Mentions: We extract experimental data from Fig 3a and 3b from Schmickl and Crailsheim [13] to construct two figures. Fig 9 compares our model with experimental population of adult bees from sources Omholt [37], Fukuda [38], and Bühlmann [39]. Schmickl and Crailsheim normalize the experimental data because the experimental data was collected for different sizes of honey bee colonies. Fig 10 compares our model with the experimental brood population from sources Bretschko [40], Bodenheimer [41] and Kunert and Crailsheim [42]. Our model colony seems to lie within the range of variability of experimental data, although our brood size peak seems high and our adult bee size peak seems low. Becher et al. [14] also compare their model with the empirical data from [37–39]. They also include brood cell data from Imdorf et al. [43] who show that the number of brood cells peaks between 23,000 to 34,000. We acknowledge that the dynamics of experimental bee populations will depend on the geographical location and length of the foraging season [7].

Bottom Line: Understanding the recent decline in honey bee colonies hinges on understanding the factors that impact each of these different age castes.Subsequently, we study transient bee population dynamics by building upon the modeling foundation established by Schmickl and Crailsheim and Khoury et al.We also conduct sensitivity studies and show the effects of parameter variations on the colony population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mathematics and Physical Science, Northern New Mexico College, Espanola, NM, USA.

ABSTRACT
Eusocial honey bee populations (Apis mellifera) employ an age stratification organization of egg, larvae, pupae, hive bees and foraging bees. Understanding the recent decline in honey bee colonies hinges on understanding the factors that impact each of these different age castes. We first perform an analysis of steady state bee populations given mortality rates within each bee caste and find that the honey bee colony is highly susceptible to hive and pupae mortality rates. Subsequently, we study transient bee population dynamics by building upon the modeling foundation established by Schmickl and Crailsheim and Khoury et al. Our transient model based on differential equations accounts for the effects of pheromones in slowing the maturation of hive bees to foraging bees, the increased mortality of larvae in the absence of sufficient hive bees, and the effects of food scarcity. We also conduct sensitivity studies and show the effects of parameter variations on the colony population.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus