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De Novo Transcriptome Assembly and Identification of Gene Candidates for Rapid Evolution of Soil Al Tolerance in Anthoxanthum odoratum at the Long-Term Park Grass Experiment.

Gould B, McCouch S, Geber M - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: We found that despite its high tolerance Anthoxanthum is not an Al accumulating species.Expression of a large suite of novel loci was also triggered by early exposure to Al stress in roots.Three-hundred forty five transcripts were significantly more up- or down-regulated in tolerant vs. sensitive Anthoxanthum genotypes, providing important targets for future study of rapid evolution at the PGE.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plant Biology, Plant Biology Laboratories, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Studies of adaptation in the wild grass Anthoxanthum odoratum at the Park Grass Experiment (PGE) provided one of the earliest examples of rapid evolution in plants. Anthoxanthum has become locally adapted to differences in soil Al toxicity, which have developed there due to soil acidification from long-term experimental fertilizer treatments. In this study, we used transcriptome sequencing to identify Al stress responsive genes in Anthoxanhum and identify candidates among them for further molecular study of rapid Al tolerance evolution at the PGE. We examined the Al content of Anthoxanthum tissues and conducted RNA-sequencing of root tips, the primary site of Al induced damage. We found that despite its high tolerance Anthoxanthum is not an Al accumulating species. Genes similar to those involved in organic acid exudation (TaALMT1, ZmMATE), cell wall modification (OsSTAR1), and internal Al detoxification (OsNRAT1) in cultivated grasses were responsive to Al exposure. Expression of a large suite of novel loci was also triggered by early exposure to Al stress in roots. Three-hundred forty five transcripts were significantly more up- or down-regulated in tolerant vs. sensitive Anthoxanthum genotypes, providing important targets for future study of rapid evolution at the PGE.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Al content of plants.A) three seedling tissues; B) and C) correlation of average tissue Al content of 10 seedling groups (see methods) with average group Al tolerance. (To control for seedling size differences, the average percent relative root growth values are used.) Cell sap Al content was standardized by mg cell wall in the sample. ns, non-significant. Levels with different letters are significantly different from each other at p<0.05 (Tukey’s HSD test).
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pone.0124424.g001: Al content of plants.A) three seedling tissues; B) and C) correlation of average tissue Al content of 10 seedling groups (see methods) with average group Al tolerance. (To control for seedling size differences, the average percent relative root growth values are used.) Cell sap Al content was standardized by mg cell wall in the sample. ns, non-significant. Levels with different letters are significantly different from each other at p<0.05 (Tukey’s HSD test).

Mentions: In Al exposed seedlings, Al was clearly partitioned between plant tissues (F(2,29) = 8.34, p = 0.001, Fig 1A). Leaf tissue on average had 44% as much Al as root tip cell walls and 40% as much Al as the root tip cell sap. The Al contents of roots and shoots were not significantly correlated with each other (Table E in S1 File). Within the roots, lower Al content in the cell wall was associated with higher tolerance (Fig 1B, N = 10, r = -0.65, p = 0.04). There was no strong correlation between Al content inside the root cells (cell sap) and Al tolerance (Fig 1C, N = 10, r = -0.14, p = 0.68).


De Novo Transcriptome Assembly and Identification of Gene Candidates for Rapid Evolution of Soil Al Tolerance in Anthoxanthum odoratum at the Long-Term Park Grass Experiment.

Gould B, McCouch S, Geber M - PLoS ONE (2015)

Al content of plants.A) three seedling tissues; B) and C) correlation of average tissue Al content of 10 seedling groups (see methods) with average group Al tolerance. (To control for seedling size differences, the average percent relative root growth values are used.) Cell sap Al content was standardized by mg cell wall in the sample. ns, non-significant. Levels with different letters are significantly different from each other at p<0.05 (Tukey’s HSD test).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493143&req=5

pone.0124424.g001: Al content of plants.A) three seedling tissues; B) and C) correlation of average tissue Al content of 10 seedling groups (see methods) with average group Al tolerance. (To control for seedling size differences, the average percent relative root growth values are used.) Cell sap Al content was standardized by mg cell wall in the sample. ns, non-significant. Levels with different letters are significantly different from each other at p<0.05 (Tukey’s HSD test).
Mentions: In Al exposed seedlings, Al was clearly partitioned between plant tissues (F(2,29) = 8.34, p = 0.001, Fig 1A). Leaf tissue on average had 44% as much Al as root tip cell walls and 40% as much Al as the root tip cell sap. The Al contents of roots and shoots were not significantly correlated with each other (Table E in S1 File). Within the roots, lower Al content in the cell wall was associated with higher tolerance (Fig 1B, N = 10, r = -0.65, p = 0.04). There was no strong correlation between Al content inside the root cells (cell sap) and Al tolerance (Fig 1C, N = 10, r = -0.14, p = 0.68).

Bottom Line: We found that despite its high tolerance Anthoxanthum is not an Al accumulating species.Expression of a large suite of novel loci was also triggered by early exposure to Al stress in roots.Three-hundred forty five transcripts were significantly more up- or down-regulated in tolerant vs. sensitive Anthoxanthum genotypes, providing important targets for future study of rapid evolution at the PGE.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plant Biology, Plant Biology Laboratories, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Studies of adaptation in the wild grass Anthoxanthum odoratum at the Park Grass Experiment (PGE) provided one of the earliest examples of rapid evolution in plants. Anthoxanthum has become locally adapted to differences in soil Al toxicity, which have developed there due to soil acidification from long-term experimental fertilizer treatments. In this study, we used transcriptome sequencing to identify Al stress responsive genes in Anthoxanhum and identify candidates among them for further molecular study of rapid Al tolerance evolution at the PGE. We examined the Al content of Anthoxanthum tissues and conducted RNA-sequencing of root tips, the primary site of Al induced damage. We found that despite its high tolerance Anthoxanthum is not an Al accumulating species. Genes similar to those involved in organic acid exudation (TaALMT1, ZmMATE), cell wall modification (OsSTAR1), and internal Al detoxification (OsNRAT1) in cultivated grasses were responsive to Al exposure. Expression of a large suite of novel loci was also triggered by early exposure to Al stress in roots. Three-hundred forty five transcripts were significantly more up- or down-regulated in tolerant vs. sensitive Anthoxanthum genotypes, providing important targets for future study of rapid evolution at the PGE.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus