Limits...
Weight Watching and the Effect of Landscape on Honeybee Colony Productivity: Investigating the Value of Colony Weight Monitoring for the Beekeeping Industry.

Lecocq A, Kryger P, Vejsnæs F, Bruun Jensen A - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Over the last few decades, a gradual departure away from traditional agricultural practices has resulted in alterations to the composition of the countryside and landscapes across Europe.Once this was carried out, we were able to show that colonies situated in landscapes composed of more than 50% urban areas were significantly more productive than colonies situated in those with more than 50% agricultural areas or those in mixed areas.As well as exploring some of the potential reasons for the observed differences, we discuss the value of weight monitoring of colonies on a large scale.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Copenhagen, Department of Plants and Environmental Sciences-PLEN, 1871 Frederiksberg C, Denmark.

ABSTRACT
Over the last few decades, a gradual departure away from traditional agricultural practices has resulted in alterations to the composition of the countryside and landscapes across Europe. In the face of such changes, monitoring the development and productivity of honey bee colonies from different sites can give valuable insight on the influence of landscape on their productivity and might point towards future directions for modernized beekeeping practices. Using data on honeybee colony weights provided by electronic scales spread across Denmark, we investigated the effect of the immediate landscape on colony productivity. In order to extract meaningful information, data manipulation was necessary prior to analysis as a result of different management regimes or scales malfunction. Once this was carried out, we were able to show that colonies situated in landscapes composed of more than 50% urban areas were significantly more productive than colonies situated in those with more than 50% agricultural areas or those in mixed areas. As well as exploring some of the potential reasons for the observed differences, we discuss the value of weight monitoring of colonies on a large scale.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Average monthly change in weight, in kg/day, by landscape type for a 1km radius circle around the hives.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493132&req=5

pone.0132473.g010: Average monthly change in weight, in kg/day, by landscape type for a 1km radius circle around the hives.

Mentions: Coupled with apiary locations, and landscape types at the national level provided by the CORINE 2006 data, the data can provide some insight into the effect of the immediate landscape on colony productivity. For a 3km radius (F = 5.213; P = 0.023) and a 1km radius (F = 9.104; P = 0.003) around each apiary, we found significant effects of the proportion of artificial surfaces on the weight of the colonies, but no significant effect of the proportion of agricultural areas at 3km (F = 1.748; P = 0.186) or 1km (F = 3.689; P = 0.055). When we considered the landscape categories as described earlier, the location of each hive significantly impacted the weight of the colony based on the monitoring data at both the 3km (F = 3.11; P = 0.041) and 1km (F = 3.531; P = 0.030) radii. At the 3km radius, hives in urban environments tended to weigh more than their counterparts in mixed (Pairwise Comparison, T = 2.39; P = 0.017) or predominantly agricultural landscapes (Pairwise Comparison, T = 5.60; P = 0.028) (Fig 8). At the 1km radius, hives in urban environment weighed more than those in agricultural landscapes (T = 2.655; P = 0.008). However, at this radius we lost the significant difference with mixed landscapes (T = 1.629; P = 0.104). These differences were also present when comparing the productive months of the year, or the consumption rate of colonies during the non-productive months of the year, with the immediate land types of the hives (Figs 9 and 10). However, significant differences at this level only appeared from the month of July onwards, and through to December.


Weight Watching and the Effect of Landscape on Honeybee Colony Productivity: Investigating the Value of Colony Weight Monitoring for the Beekeeping Industry.

Lecocq A, Kryger P, Vejsnæs F, Bruun Jensen A - PLoS ONE (2015)

Average monthly change in weight, in kg/day, by landscape type for a 1km radius circle around the hives.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493132&req=5

pone.0132473.g010: Average monthly change in weight, in kg/day, by landscape type for a 1km radius circle around the hives.
Mentions: Coupled with apiary locations, and landscape types at the national level provided by the CORINE 2006 data, the data can provide some insight into the effect of the immediate landscape on colony productivity. For a 3km radius (F = 5.213; P = 0.023) and a 1km radius (F = 9.104; P = 0.003) around each apiary, we found significant effects of the proportion of artificial surfaces on the weight of the colonies, but no significant effect of the proportion of agricultural areas at 3km (F = 1.748; P = 0.186) or 1km (F = 3.689; P = 0.055). When we considered the landscape categories as described earlier, the location of each hive significantly impacted the weight of the colony based on the monitoring data at both the 3km (F = 3.11; P = 0.041) and 1km (F = 3.531; P = 0.030) radii. At the 3km radius, hives in urban environments tended to weigh more than their counterparts in mixed (Pairwise Comparison, T = 2.39; P = 0.017) or predominantly agricultural landscapes (Pairwise Comparison, T = 5.60; P = 0.028) (Fig 8). At the 1km radius, hives in urban environment weighed more than those in agricultural landscapes (T = 2.655; P = 0.008). However, at this radius we lost the significant difference with mixed landscapes (T = 1.629; P = 0.104). These differences were also present when comparing the productive months of the year, or the consumption rate of colonies during the non-productive months of the year, with the immediate land types of the hives (Figs 9 and 10). However, significant differences at this level only appeared from the month of July onwards, and through to December.

Bottom Line: Over the last few decades, a gradual departure away from traditional agricultural practices has resulted in alterations to the composition of the countryside and landscapes across Europe.Once this was carried out, we were able to show that colonies situated in landscapes composed of more than 50% urban areas were significantly more productive than colonies situated in those with more than 50% agricultural areas or those in mixed areas.As well as exploring some of the potential reasons for the observed differences, we discuss the value of weight monitoring of colonies on a large scale.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Copenhagen, Department of Plants and Environmental Sciences-PLEN, 1871 Frederiksberg C, Denmark.

ABSTRACT
Over the last few decades, a gradual departure away from traditional agricultural practices has resulted in alterations to the composition of the countryside and landscapes across Europe. In the face of such changes, monitoring the development and productivity of honey bee colonies from different sites can give valuable insight on the influence of landscape on their productivity and might point towards future directions for modernized beekeeping practices. Using data on honeybee colony weights provided by electronic scales spread across Denmark, we investigated the effect of the immediate landscape on colony productivity. In order to extract meaningful information, data manipulation was necessary prior to analysis as a result of different management regimes or scales malfunction. Once this was carried out, we were able to show that colonies situated in landscapes composed of more than 50% urban areas were significantly more productive than colonies situated in those with more than 50% agricultural areas or those in mixed areas. As well as exploring some of the potential reasons for the observed differences, we discuss the value of weight monitoring of colonies on a large scale.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus