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Weight Watching and the Effect of Landscape on Honeybee Colony Productivity: Investigating the Value of Colony Weight Monitoring for the Beekeeping Industry.

Lecocq A, Kryger P, Vejsnæs F, Bruun Jensen A - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Over the last few decades, a gradual departure away from traditional agricultural practices has resulted in alterations to the composition of the countryside and landscapes across Europe.Once this was carried out, we were able to show that colonies situated in landscapes composed of more than 50% urban areas were significantly more productive than colonies situated in those with more than 50% agricultural areas or those in mixed areas.As well as exploring some of the potential reasons for the observed differences, we discuss the value of weight monitoring of colonies on a large scale.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Copenhagen, Department of Plants and Environmental Sciences-PLEN, 1871 Frederiksberg C, Denmark.

ABSTRACT
Over the last few decades, a gradual departure away from traditional agricultural practices has resulted in alterations to the composition of the countryside and landscapes across Europe. In the face of such changes, monitoring the development and productivity of honey bee colonies from different sites can give valuable insight on the influence of landscape on their productivity and might point towards future directions for modernized beekeeping practices. Using data on honeybee colony weights provided by electronic scales spread across Denmark, we investigated the effect of the immediate landscape on colony productivity. In order to extract meaningful information, data manipulation was necessary prior to analysis as a result of different management regimes or scales malfunction. Once this was carried out, we were able to show that colonies situated in landscapes composed of more than 50% urban areas were significantly more productive than colonies situated in those with more than 50% agricultural areas or those in mixed areas. As well as exploring some of the potential reasons for the observed differences, we discuss the value of weight monitoring of colonies on a large scale.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean seasonal rainfall in millimeters for the whole of Denmark in the years 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013.Means that do not share a letter are statistically significant. Source: dmi.dk.
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pone.0132473.g007: Mean seasonal rainfall in millimeters for the whole of Denmark in the years 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013.Means that do not share a letter are statistically significant. Source: dmi.dk.

Mentions: When comparing the environmental variables in the study years, we found significant differences in temperatures between the years (Fig 6) in autumn (One-Way ANOVA; F = 19.55, P< 0.001), spring (One-Way ANOVA; F = 4.41, P = 0.005) and winter (One-Way ANOVA; F = 31.47, P< 0.001) but not in summer (One-Way ANOVA; F = 1.43, P = 0.235). With regards to rainfall (Fig 7), we found significant differences in autumn (One-Way ANOVA; F = 15.64, P< 0.001), spring (One-Way ANOVA; F = 4.72, P = 0.003), summer (One-Way ANOVA; F = 68.19, P< 0.001) and winter (One-Way ANOVA; F = 6.30, P< 0.001). However, monthly averages in temperature and rainfall between months of different years showed even greater variability. June 2012 was punctuated by lower temperature and higher rainfall (12.7 C°; 98 mm) than in 2010 (13.9 C°; 52 mm), 2011 (15.1 C°; 75 mm) and 2013 (14 C°; 68 mm). A similar pattern could be observed in July for the years 2011 and 2012. Negative correlations between rainfall and weight change in June (R = -0.65; P< 0.001) and to a lesser extent July (R = -0.36; P = 0.002) and positive correlations between temperature and weight change in June (R = 0.39; P = 0.001) and July (R = 0.57; P< 0.001) seem to corroborate the results.


Weight Watching and the Effect of Landscape on Honeybee Colony Productivity: Investigating the Value of Colony Weight Monitoring for the Beekeeping Industry.

Lecocq A, Kryger P, Vejsnæs F, Bruun Jensen A - PLoS ONE (2015)

Mean seasonal rainfall in millimeters for the whole of Denmark in the years 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013.Means that do not share a letter are statistically significant. Source: dmi.dk.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493132&req=5

pone.0132473.g007: Mean seasonal rainfall in millimeters for the whole of Denmark in the years 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013.Means that do not share a letter are statistically significant. Source: dmi.dk.
Mentions: When comparing the environmental variables in the study years, we found significant differences in temperatures between the years (Fig 6) in autumn (One-Way ANOVA; F = 19.55, P< 0.001), spring (One-Way ANOVA; F = 4.41, P = 0.005) and winter (One-Way ANOVA; F = 31.47, P< 0.001) but not in summer (One-Way ANOVA; F = 1.43, P = 0.235). With regards to rainfall (Fig 7), we found significant differences in autumn (One-Way ANOVA; F = 15.64, P< 0.001), spring (One-Way ANOVA; F = 4.72, P = 0.003), summer (One-Way ANOVA; F = 68.19, P< 0.001) and winter (One-Way ANOVA; F = 6.30, P< 0.001). However, monthly averages in temperature and rainfall between months of different years showed even greater variability. June 2012 was punctuated by lower temperature and higher rainfall (12.7 C°; 98 mm) than in 2010 (13.9 C°; 52 mm), 2011 (15.1 C°; 75 mm) and 2013 (14 C°; 68 mm). A similar pattern could be observed in July for the years 2011 and 2012. Negative correlations between rainfall and weight change in June (R = -0.65; P< 0.001) and to a lesser extent July (R = -0.36; P = 0.002) and positive correlations between temperature and weight change in June (R = 0.39; P = 0.001) and July (R = 0.57; P< 0.001) seem to corroborate the results.

Bottom Line: Over the last few decades, a gradual departure away from traditional agricultural practices has resulted in alterations to the composition of the countryside and landscapes across Europe.Once this was carried out, we were able to show that colonies situated in landscapes composed of more than 50% urban areas were significantly more productive than colonies situated in those with more than 50% agricultural areas or those in mixed areas.As well as exploring some of the potential reasons for the observed differences, we discuss the value of weight monitoring of colonies on a large scale.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Copenhagen, Department of Plants and Environmental Sciences-PLEN, 1871 Frederiksberg C, Denmark.

ABSTRACT
Over the last few decades, a gradual departure away from traditional agricultural practices has resulted in alterations to the composition of the countryside and landscapes across Europe. In the face of such changes, monitoring the development and productivity of honey bee colonies from different sites can give valuable insight on the influence of landscape on their productivity and might point towards future directions for modernized beekeeping practices. Using data on honeybee colony weights provided by electronic scales spread across Denmark, we investigated the effect of the immediate landscape on colony productivity. In order to extract meaningful information, data manipulation was necessary prior to analysis as a result of different management regimes or scales malfunction. Once this was carried out, we were able to show that colonies situated in landscapes composed of more than 50% urban areas were significantly more productive than colonies situated in those with more than 50% agricultural areas or those in mixed areas. As well as exploring some of the potential reasons for the observed differences, we discuss the value of weight monitoring of colonies on a large scale.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus