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Discrimination between Sedimentary Rocks from Close-Range Visible and Very-Near-Infrared Images.

Del Pozo S, Lindenbergh R, Rodríguez-Gonzálvez P, Kees Blom J, González-Aguilera D - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: This paper proposes the use of a low-cost handy sensor, a calibrated visible-very near infrared (VIS-VNIR) multispectral camera for the recognition of different geological formations.The spectral data was recorded by a Tetracam Mini-MCA-6 camera mounted on a field-based platform covering six bands in the spectral range of 0.530-0.801 µm.Twelve sedimentary formations were selected in the Rhône-Alpes region (France) to analyse the discrimination potential of this camera for rock types and close-range mapping applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cartographic and Land Engineering, University of Salamanca, Polytechnic School of Avila, Avila, Spain.

ABSTRACT
Variation in the mineral composition of rocks results in a change of their spectral response capable of being studied by imaging spectroscopy. This paper proposes the use of a low-cost handy sensor, a calibrated visible-very near infrared (VIS-VNIR) multispectral camera for the recognition of different geological formations. The spectral data was recorded by a Tetracam Mini-MCA-6 camera mounted on a field-based platform covering six bands in the spectral range of 0.530-0.801 µm. Twelve sedimentary formations were selected in the Rhône-Alpes region (France) to analyse the discrimination potential of this camera for rock types and close-range mapping applications. After proper corrections and data processing, a supervised classification of the multispectral data was performed trying to distinguish four classes: limestones, marlstones, vegetation and shadows. After a maximum-likelihood classification, results confirmed that this camera can be efficiently exploited to map limestone-marlstone alternations in geological formations with this mineral composition.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Stratigraphic column of the 12-different Mesozoic geologic formations from newest to oldest.
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pone.0132471.g002: Stratigraphic column of the 12-different Mesozoic geologic formations from newest to oldest.

Mentions: The radiometric campaign was carried out in June 2014 in the Drôme department of France, in the southeastern part of the Rhône-Alps region (Fig 1). This area is lithologically characterized by sedimentary deposits of the Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous interval. In these periods, carbonate sedimentation was deposited at different water depths: a few meters only of depth in shallow-marine areas [18], and up to several hundred meters of water depth in pelagic marine areas. During these periods there were different deposition processes which gave rise to the current outcrops mainly consisting of carbonate minerals with trace amounts of silica (limestones) and clay minerals (marlstones) with different degrees of uniformity across the layers of strata. On one hand, there were heterogeneous formations with limestone-marlstone alternations formed during the Kimmerdigien, Valanginian or Hauterivian ages (see Fig 2). On the other, there were more homogeneous massive outcrops from the Tithonian and Turonian ages. And finally, marlstone outcrops formed during the Oxfordian, Aptian and Albian ages [19]. The geology, geo-chemistry and mineralization of the study area are well described in the literature [20, 21].


Discrimination between Sedimentary Rocks from Close-Range Visible and Very-Near-Infrared Images.

Del Pozo S, Lindenbergh R, Rodríguez-Gonzálvez P, Kees Blom J, González-Aguilera D - PLoS ONE (2015)

Stratigraphic column of the 12-different Mesozoic geologic formations from newest to oldest.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493113&req=5

pone.0132471.g002: Stratigraphic column of the 12-different Mesozoic geologic formations from newest to oldest.
Mentions: The radiometric campaign was carried out in June 2014 in the Drôme department of France, in the southeastern part of the Rhône-Alps region (Fig 1). This area is lithologically characterized by sedimentary deposits of the Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous interval. In these periods, carbonate sedimentation was deposited at different water depths: a few meters only of depth in shallow-marine areas [18], and up to several hundred meters of water depth in pelagic marine areas. During these periods there were different deposition processes which gave rise to the current outcrops mainly consisting of carbonate minerals with trace amounts of silica (limestones) and clay minerals (marlstones) with different degrees of uniformity across the layers of strata. On one hand, there were heterogeneous formations with limestone-marlstone alternations formed during the Kimmerdigien, Valanginian or Hauterivian ages (see Fig 2). On the other, there were more homogeneous massive outcrops from the Tithonian and Turonian ages. And finally, marlstone outcrops formed during the Oxfordian, Aptian and Albian ages [19]. The geology, geo-chemistry and mineralization of the study area are well described in the literature [20, 21].

Bottom Line: This paper proposes the use of a low-cost handy sensor, a calibrated visible-very near infrared (VIS-VNIR) multispectral camera for the recognition of different geological formations.The spectral data was recorded by a Tetracam Mini-MCA-6 camera mounted on a field-based platform covering six bands in the spectral range of 0.530-0.801 µm.Twelve sedimentary formations were selected in the Rhône-Alpes region (France) to analyse the discrimination potential of this camera for rock types and close-range mapping applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cartographic and Land Engineering, University of Salamanca, Polytechnic School of Avila, Avila, Spain.

ABSTRACT
Variation in the mineral composition of rocks results in a change of their spectral response capable of being studied by imaging spectroscopy. This paper proposes the use of a low-cost handy sensor, a calibrated visible-very near infrared (VIS-VNIR) multispectral camera for the recognition of different geological formations. The spectral data was recorded by a Tetracam Mini-MCA-6 camera mounted on a field-based platform covering six bands in the spectral range of 0.530-0.801 µm. Twelve sedimentary formations were selected in the Rhône-Alpes region (France) to analyse the discrimination potential of this camera for rock types and close-range mapping applications. After proper corrections and data processing, a supervised classification of the multispectral data was performed trying to distinguish four classes: limestones, marlstones, vegetation and shadows. After a maximum-likelihood classification, results confirmed that this camera can be efficiently exploited to map limestone-marlstone alternations in geological formations with this mineral composition.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus