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Space Use and Habitat Selection by Resident and Transient Coyotes (Canis latrans).

Hinton JW, van Manen FT, Chamberlain MJ - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Resident and transient coyotes demonstrated similar habitat selection, notably selection of agricultural over forested habitats.However, transients exhibited stronger selection for roads than resident coyotes.Although transient coyotes are less likely to contribute reproductively to their population, transiency may be an important life history trait that facilitates metapopulation dynamics through dispersal and the eventual replacement of breeding residents lost to mortality.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Little information exists on coyote (Canis latrans) space use and habitat selection in the southeastern United States and most studies conducted in the Southeast have been carried out within small study areas (e.g., ≤1,000 km2). Therefore, studying the placement, size, and habitat composition of coyote home ranges over broad geographic areas could provide relevant insights regarding how coyote populations adjust to regionally varying ecological conditions. Despite an increasing number of studies of coyote ecology, few studies have assessed the role of transiency as a life-history strategy among coyotes. During 2009-2011, we used GPS radio-telemetry to study coyote space use and habitat selection on the Albemarle Peninsula of northeastern North Carolina. We quantified space use and 2nd- and 3rd-order habitat selection for resident and transient coyotes to describe space use patterns in a predominantly agricultural landscape. The upper limit of coyote home-range size was approximately 47 km2 and coyotes exhibiting shifting patterns of space use of areas >65 km2 were transients. Transients exhibited localized space use patterns for short durations prior to establishing home ranges, which we defined as "biding" areas. Resident and transient coyotes demonstrated similar habitat selection, notably selection of agricultural over forested habitats. However, transients exhibited stronger selection for roads than resident coyotes. Although transient coyotes are less likely to contribute reproductively to their population, transiency may be an important life history trait that facilitates metapopulation dynamics through dispersal and the eventual replacement of breeding residents lost to mortality.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Transient locations and estimated home ranges of coyotes 505M and 613M in eastern North Carolina.Coyote 505M was monitored as a transient from 16 April 2009 until 31 May 2009. Coyote 505M established a territory approximately 1 June 2009 and maintained it until 27 October 2009 when he was displaced by a neighboring red wolf pack. Coyote 613M was monitored as a transient from 7 January 2011 until 4 April 2011. Coyote 613M established a territory approximately 5 April 2011 after the resident red wolf pack dissolved after the death of a breeder. Coyote 613M was monitored as a resident from 5 April 2011 until 16 August 2012 when his GPS collar failed.
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pone.0132203.g006: Transient locations and estimated home ranges of coyotes 505M and 613M in eastern North Carolina.Coyote 505M was monitored as a transient from 16 April 2009 until 31 May 2009. Coyote 505M established a territory approximately 1 June 2009 and maintained it until 27 October 2009 when he was displaced by a neighboring red wolf pack. Coyote 613M was monitored as a transient from 7 January 2011 until 4 April 2011. Coyote 613M established a territory approximately 5 April 2011 after the resident red wolf pack dissolved after the death of a breeder. Coyote 613M was monitored as a resident from 5 April 2011 until 16 August 2012 when his GPS collar failed.

Mentions: Our findings indicate that transient individuals may play a crucial role in dynamic space-use patterns of coyotes. Similar to other studies [7,11,51], our results indicate that approximately 70% of coyotes in eastern North Carolina are likely residents whereas the remaining 30% are transients. Transients consisted of younger and smaller individuals than residents and this may indicate that most transients are dispersing juveniles. However, as breeding pairs and packs are disrupted via natural or anthropogenic sources, older individuals who previously were residents may become transient as well. For instance, after coyote 505M (Fig 6) established a home range, he was displaced by a neighboring red wolf pack and was a transient for approximately 15 weeks until establishing a second territory with a female red wolf. Under the direction of the Recovery Program, 505M was removed during October 2011 so the female red wolf would be available to potential red wolf mates. Indeed, approximately 4 weeks later, a male red wolf moved in and formed a breeding pair with the female red wolf (USFWS, unpublished data).


Space Use and Habitat Selection by Resident and Transient Coyotes (Canis latrans).

Hinton JW, van Manen FT, Chamberlain MJ - PLoS ONE (2015)

Transient locations and estimated home ranges of coyotes 505M and 613M in eastern North Carolina.Coyote 505M was monitored as a transient from 16 April 2009 until 31 May 2009. Coyote 505M established a territory approximately 1 June 2009 and maintained it until 27 October 2009 when he was displaced by a neighboring red wolf pack. Coyote 613M was monitored as a transient from 7 January 2011 until 4 April 2011. Coyote 613M established a territory approximately 5 April 2011 after the resident red wolf pack dissolved after the death of a breeder. Coyote 613M was monitored as a resident from 5 April 2011 until 16 August 2012 when his GPS collar failed.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493083&req=5

pone.0132203.g006: Transient locations and estimated home ranges of coyotes 505M and 613M in eastern North Carolina.Coyote 505M was monitored as a transient from 16 April 2009 until 31 May 2009. Coyote 505M established a territory approximately 1 June 2009 and maintained it until 27 October 2009 when he was displaced by a neighboring red wolf pack. Coyote 613M was monitored as a transient from 7 January 2011 until 4 April 2011. Coyote 613M established a territory approximately 5 April 2011 after the resident red wolf pack dissolved after the death of a breeder. Coyote 613M was monitored as a resident from 5 April 2011 until 16 August 2012 when his GPS collar failed.
Mentions: Our findings indicate that transient individuals may play a crucial role in dynamic space-use patterns of coyotes. Similar to other studies [7,11,51], our results indicate that approximately 70% of coyotes in eastern North Carolina are likely residents whereas the remaining 30% are transients. Transients consisted of younger and smaller individuals than residents and this may indicate that most transients are dispersing juveniles. However, as breeding pairs and packs are disrupted via natural or anthropogenic sources, older individuals who previously were residents may become transient as well. For instance, after coyote 505M (Fig 6) established a home range, he was displaced by a neighboring red wolf pack and was a transient for approximately 15 weeks until establishing a second territory with a female red wolf. Under the direction of the Recovery Program, 505M was removed during October 2011 so the female red wolf would be available to potential red wolf mates. Indeed, approximately 4 weeks later, a male red wolf moved in and formed a breeding pair with the female red wolf (USFWS, unpublished data).

Bottom Line: Resident and transient coyotes demonstrated similar habitat selection, notably selection of agricultural over forested habitats.However, transients exhibited stronger selection for roads than resident coyotes.Although transient coyotes are less likely to contribute reproductively to their population, transiency may be an important life history trait that facilitates metapopulation dynamics through dispersal and the eventual replacement of breeding residents lost to mortality.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Little information exists on coyote (Canis latrans) space use and habitat selection in the southeastern United States and most studies conducted in the Southeast have been carried out within small study areas (e.g., ≤1,000 km2). Therefore, studying the placement, size, and habitat composition of coyote home ranges over broad geographic areas could provide relevant insights regarding how coyote populations adjust to regionally varying ecological conditions. Despite an increasing number of studies of coyote ecology, few studies have assessed the role of transiency as a life-history strategy among coyotes. During 2009-2011, we used GPS radio-telemetry to study coyote space use and habitat selection on the Albemarle Peninsula of northeastern North Carolina. We quantified space use and 2nd- and 3rd-order habitat selection for resident and transient coyotes to describe space use patterns in a predominantly agricultural landscape. The upper limit of coyote home-range size was approximately 47 km2 and coyotes exhibiting shifting patterns of space use of areas >65 km2 were transients. Transients exhibited localized space use patterns for short durations prior to establishing home ranges, which we defined as "biding" areas. Resident and transient coyotes demonstrated similar habitat selection, notably selection of agricultural over forested habitats. However, transients exhibited stronger selection for roads than resident coyotes. Although transient coyotes are less likely to contribute reproductively to their population, transiency may be an important life history trait that facilitates metapopulation dynamics through dispersal and the eventual replacement of breeding residents lost to mortality.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus