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Curcumin Ingestion Inhibits Mastocytosis and Suppresses Intestinal Anaphylaxis in a Murine Model of Food Allergy.

Kinney SR, Carlson L, Ser-Dolansky J, Thompson C, Shah S, Gambrah A, Xing W, Schneider SS, Mathias CB - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: In contrast, mice exposed to oral curcumin throughout the experimental regimen appeared to be normal and did not exhibit intense allergic diarrhea or a significant enhancement of OVA-IgE and intestinal mast cell expansion and activation.Finally, the suppression of intestinal anaphylaxis by curcumin was directly linked with the inhibition of NF-κB activation in curcumin-treated allergic mice, and curcumin inhibited the phosphorylation of the p65 subunit of NF-κB in BMMCs.In summary, our data demonstrates a protective role for curcumin during allergic responses to food antigens, suggesting that frequent ingestion of this spice may modulate the outcome of disease in susceptible individuals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pharmaceutical and Administrative Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Western New England University, Springfield, MA 01119, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
IgE antibodies and mast cells play critical roles in the establishment of allergic responses to food antigens. Curcumin, the active ingredient of the curry spice turmeric, has anti-inflammatory properties, and thus may have the capacity to regulate Th2 cells and mucosal mast cell function during allergic responses. We assessed whether curcumin ingestion during oral allergen exposure can modulate the development of food allergy using a murine model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced intestinal anaphylaxis. Herein, we demonstrate that frequent ingestion of curcumin during oral OVA exposure inhibits the development of mastocytosis and intestinal anaphylaxis in OVA-challenged allergic mice. Intragastric (i.g.) exposure to OVA in sensitized BALB/c mice induced a robust IgE-mediated response accompanied by enhanced OVA-IgE levels, intestinal mastocytosis, elevated serum mMCP-1, and acute diarrhea. In contrast, mice exposed to oral curcumin throughout the experimental regimen appeared to be normal and did not exhibit intense allergic diarrhea or a significant enhancement of OVA-IgE and intestinal mast cell expansion and activation. Furthermore, allergic diarrhea, mast cell activation and expansion, and Th2 responses were also suppressed in mice exposed to curcumin during the OVA-challenge phase alone, despite the presence of elevated levels of OVA-IgE, suggesting that curcumin may have a direct suppressive effect on intestinal mast cell activation and reverse food allergy symptoms in allergen-sensitized individuals. This was confirmed by observations that curcumin attenuated the expansion of both adoptively transferred bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs), and inhibited their survival and activation during cell culture. Finally, the suppression of intestinal anaphylaxis by curcumin was directly linked with the inhibition of NF-κB activation in curcumin-treated allergic mice, and curcumin inhibited the phosphorylation of the p65 subunit of NF-κB in BMMCs. In summary, our data demonstrates a protective role for curcumin during allergic responses to food antigens, suggesting that frequent ingestion of this spice may modulate the outcome of disease in susceptible individuals.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Exposure to curcumin during OVA-challenge alone suppresses allergic diarrhea, and mast cell expansion and activation.Mice were fed with OVA and treated with curcumin during OVA-challenge alone as depicted in Fig 1C. (A) Levels of serum OVA-IgE (1:50 dilution of serum was used for the assay); (B) Percent of mice with diarrhea; (C) CAE+ mast cells; (D) and serum mMCP-1 levels are shown. Data are representative of 3 independent experiments. * = p<0.05; ** = p<0.01.
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pone.0132467.g006: Exposure to curcumin during OVA-challenge alone suppresses allergic diarrhea, and mast cell expansion and activation.Mice were fed with OVA and treated with curcumin during OVA-challenge alone as depicted in Fig 1C. (A) Levels of serum OVA-IgE (1:50 dilution of serum was used for the assay); (B) Percent of mice with diarrhea; (C) CAE+ mast cells; (D) and serum mMCP-1 levels are shown. Data are representative of 3 independent experiments. * = p<0.05; ** = p<0.01.

Mentions: We therefore examined whether curcumin ingestion during OVA-challenge alone would modulate the outcome of intestinal anaphylaxis in this model. Mice were sensitized and challenged with OVA, and some mice (Group 3) were treated with curcumin during the challenge phase alone as depicted in Fig 1C. OVA-challenge induced the presence of OVA-IgE antibodies in both untreated and curcumin-treated BALB/c mice (Fig 6A), suggesting that curcumin ingestion during OVA-challenge has limited effects on development of Th2 cells and antibody production. Surprisingly, despite the presence of similar OVA-IgE levels, the development of allergic diarrhea was completely inhibited in curcumin-treated mice compared with untreated controls (Fig 6B). Further examination revealed significantly decreased intestinal mast cell numbers (Fig 6C), as well as decreased mast cell activation (Fig 6D), and Th2 cytokine mRNA expression (Fig 7A–7H). These data, therefore, suggest that ingestion of curcumin during the acute mast cell-dependent, OVA-challenge phase can directly modulate mast cell homeostasis and function independent of Th2 sensitization, resulting in the inhibition of mast cell-mediated effects such as allergic diarrhea.


Curcumin Ingestion Inhibits Mastocytosis and Suppresses Intestinal Anaphylaxis in a Murine Model of Food Allergy.

Kinney SR, Carlson L, Ser-Dolansky J, Thompson C, Shah S, Gambrah A, Xing W, Schneider SS, Mathias CB - PLoS ONE (2015)

Exposure to curcumin during OVA-challenge alone suppresses allergic diarrhea, and mast cell expansion and activation.Mice were fed with OVA and treated with curcumin during OVA-challenge alone as depicted in Fig 1C. (A) Levels of serum OVA-IgE (1:50 dilution of serum was used for the assay); (B) Percent of mice with diarrhea; (C) CAE+ mast cells; (D) and serum mMCP-1 levels are shown. Data are representative of 3 independent experiments. * = p<0.05; ** = p<0.01.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493063&req=5

pone.0132467.g006: Exposure to curcumin during OVA-challenge alone suppresses allergic diarrhea, and mast cell expansion and activation.Mice were fed with OVA and treated with curcumin during OVA-challenge alone as depicted in Fig 1C. (A) Levels of serum OVA-IgE (1:50 dilution of serum was used for the assay); (B) Percent of mice with diarrhea; (C) CAE+ mast cells; (D) and serum mMCP-1 levels are shown. Data are representative of 3 independent experiments. * = p<0.05; ** = p<0.01.
Mentions: We therefore examined whether curcumin ingestion during OVA-challenge alone would modulate the outcome of intestinal anaphylaxis in this model. Mice were sensitized and challenged with OVA, and some mice (Group 3) were treated with curcumin during the challenge phase alone as depicted in Fig 1C. OVA-challenge induced the presence of OVA-IgE antibodies in both untreated and curcumin-treated BALB/c mice (Fig 6A), suggesting that curcumin ingestion during OVA-challenge has limited effects on development of Th2 cells and antibody production. Surprisingly, despite the presence of similar OVA-IgE levels, the development of allergic diarrhea was completely inhibited in curcumin-treated mice compared with untreated controls (Fig 6B). Further examination revealed significantly decreased intestinal mast cell numbers (Fig 6C), as well as decreased mast cell activation (Fig 6D), and Th2 cytokine mRNA expression (Fig 7A–7H). These data, therefore, suggest that ingestion of curcumin during the acute mast cell-dependent, OVA-challenge phase can directly modulate mast cell homeostasis and function independent of Th2 sensitization, resulting in the inhibition of mast cell-mediated effects such as allergic diarrhea.

Bottom Line: In contrast, mice exposed to oral curcumin throughout the experimental regimen appeared to be normal and did not exhibit intense allergic diarrhea or a significant enhancement of OVA-IgE and intestinal mast cell expansion and activation.Finally, the suppression of intestinal anaphylaxis by curcumin was directly linked with the inhibition of NF-κB activation in curcumin-treated allergic mice, and curcumin inhibited the phosphorylation of the p65 subunit of NF-κB in BMMCs.In summary, our data demonstrates a protective role for curcumin during allergic responses to food antigens, suggesting that frequent ingestion of this spice may modulate the outcome of disease in susceptible individuals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pharmaceutical and Administrative Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Western New England University, Springfield, MA 01119, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
IgE antibodies and mast cells play critical roles in the establishment of allergic responses to food antigens. Curcumin, the active ingredient of the curry spice turmeric, has anti-inflammatory properties, and thus may have the capacity to regulate Th2 cells and mucosal mast cell function during allergic responses. We assessed whether curcumin ingestion during oral allergen exposure can modulate the development of food allergy using a murine model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced intestinal anaphylaxis. Herein, we demonstrate that frequent ingestion of curcumin during oral OVA exposure inhibits the development of mastocytosis and intestinal anaphylaxis in OVA-challenged allergic mice. Intragastric (i.g.) exposure to OVA in sensitized BALB/c mice induced a robust IgE-mediated response accompanied by enhanced OVA-IgE levels, intestinal mastocytosis, elevated serum mMCP-1, and acute diarrhea. In contrast, mice exposed to oral curcumin throughout the experimental regimen appeared to be normal and did not exhibit intense allergic diarrhea or a significant enhancement of OVA-IgE and intestinal mast cell expansion and activation. Furthermore, allergic diarrhea, mast cell activation and expansion, and Th2 responses were also suppressed in mice exposed to curcumin during the OVA-challenge phase alone, despite the presence of elevated levels of OVA-IgE, suggesting that curcumin may have a direct suppressive effect on intestinal mast cell activation and reverse food allergy symptoms in allergen-sensitized individuals. This was confirmed by observations that curcumin attenuated the expansion of both adoptively transferred bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs), and inhibited their survival and activation during cell culture. Finally, the suppression of intestinal anaphylaxis by curcumin was directly linked with the inhibition of NF-κB activation in curcumin-treated allergic mice, and curcumin inhibited the phosphorylation of the p65 subunit of NF-κB in BMMCs. In summary, our data demonstrates a protective role for curcumin during allergic responses to food antigens, suggesting that frequent ingestion of this spice may modulate the outcome of disease in susceptible individuals.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus