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Sociodemographics, Comorbidities, Healthcare Utilization and Work Productivity in Japanese Patients with Adult ADHD.

Kirino E, Imagawa H, Goto T, Montgomery W - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: ADHD respondents reported significantly more comorbid depression, sleep difficulties, headaches, and anxiety than non-ADHD controls.Respondents with ADHD reported a significantly higher degree of health-related work impairment compared to non-ADHD, with greater absenteeism and decreased work productivity.Japanese adults with ADHD face a substantial burden of illness, including lower overall health status, increased number of comorbidities, greater healthcare utilization, and significant health-related occupational impairment compared to those without ADHD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, Juntendo University Shizuoka Hospital, Izunokunishi City, Shizuoka, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: This study compared the sociodemographic characteristics, comorbidities, healthcare resource utilization, and work productivity among Japanese adults who reported being diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to those of a non-ADHD control population.

Methods: Data for this study were captured from an online survey of adults in Japan conducted by Kantar Health using consumer panels. A total of 84 survey participants reported they had received a diagnosis of ADHD from a physician. Survey responses pertaining to functional status and resource utilization from this ADHD group were compared to those from a non-ADHD control group of 100 participants. Comparisons between the ADHD and non-ADHD groups were made using chi-square tests for categorical variables and t-tests for continuous variables.

Results: Participants in the ADHD group were on average slightly younger with a higher proportion of males. ADHD respondents reported significantly more comorbid depression, sleep difficulties, headaches, and anxiety than non-ADHD controls. Over the previous 6 months, the ADHD group made more visits to healthcare providers and the emergency room, and had more hospitalizations than non-ADHD controls. The ADHD group also rated their overall health status lower than the non-ADHD control group. Respondents with ADHD reported a significantly higher degree of health-related work impairment compared to non-ADHD, with greater absenteeism and decreased work productivity. The ADHD group indicated their symptoms negatively impacted relationships, self-esteem, and regular daily activities.

Conclusions: Japanese adults with ADHD face a substantial burden of illness, including lower overall health status, increased number of comorbidities, greater healthcare utilization, and significant health-related occupational impairment compared to those without ADHD. Additional research is needed to develop a better understanding of both the consequences and treatment approaches for Japanese adults with ADHD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Comorbid Central Nervous System-related Conditions Reported over the Past 12 Months.In this self-report survey, the ADHD group consisted of patients who reported being diagnosed with ADHD by a physician. The ADHD group reported a significantly greater number of comorbid CNS-related conditions when compared to the non-ADHD control group. In particular, depression and general anxiety in the ADHD group occurred at a rate that was approximately 60- and 40-fold greater than non-ADHD controls, respectively. Abbreviations: ADHD = attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder; CNS = central nervous system; GAD = Generalized Anxiety Disorder; OCD = Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder; PD = Panic Disorder; SAD = Social Anxiety Disorder. *p < 0.05.
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pone.0132233.g001: Comorbid Central Nervous System-related Conditions Reported over the Past 12 Months.In this self-report survey, the ADHD group consisted of patients who reported being diagnosed with ADHD by a physician. The ADHD group reported a significantly greater number of comorbid CNS-related conditions when compared to the non-ADHD control group. In particular, depression and general anxiety in the ADHD group occurred at a rate that was approximately 60- and 40-fold greater than non-ADHD controls, respectively. Abbreviations: ADHD = attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder; CNS = central nervous system; GAD = Generalized Anxiety Disorder; OCD = Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder; PD = Panic Disorder; SAD = Social Anxiety Disorder. *p < 0.05.

Mentions: Over the past 12 months, comorbid conditions reported significantly more frequently in the ADHD group than in the control group included depression, sleep difficulty, and anxiety-related disorders (such as Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, Panic Disorder, phobias, and Social Anxiety Disorder). The most common comorbid condition reported by the ADHD group was depression (Fig 1). Specific to the ADHD group, 14.3% reported being diagnosed with alcoholism and 9.5% with substance use/abuse (other than alcohol), prior to being diagnosed with ADHD.


Sociodemographics, Comorbidities, Healthcare Utilization and Work Productivity in Japanese Patients with Adult ADHD.

Kirino E, Imagawa H, Goto T, Montgomery W - PLoS ONE (2015)

Comorbid Central Nervous System-related Conditions Reported over the Past 12 Months.In this self-report survey, the ADHD group consisted of patients who reported being diagnosed with ADHD by a physician. The ADHD group reported a significantly greater number of comorbid CNS-related conditions when compared to the non-ADHD control group. In particular, depression and general anxiety in the ADHD group occurred at a rate that was approximately 60- and 40-fold greater than non-ADHD controls, respectively. Abbreviations: ADHD = attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder; CNS = central nervous system; GAD = Generalized Anxiety Disorder; OCD = Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder; PD = Panic Disorder; SAD = Social Anxiety Disorder. *p < 0.05.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493035&req=5

pone.0132233.g001: Comorbid Central Nervous System-related Conditions Reported over the Past 12 Months.In this self-report survey, the ADHD group consisted of patients who reported being diagnosed with ADHD by a physician. The ADHD group reported a significantly greater number of comorbid CNS-related conditions when compared to the non-ADHD control group. In particular, depression and general anxiety in the ADHD group occurred at a rate that was approximately 60- and 40-fold greater than non-ADHD controls, respectively. Abbreviations: ADHD = attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder; CNS = central nervous system; GAD = Generalized Anxiety Disorder; OCD = Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder; PD = Panic Disorder; SAD = Social Anxiety Disorder. *p < 0.05.
Mentions: Over the past 12 months, comorbid conditions reported significantly more frequently in the ADHD group than in the control group included depression, sleep difficulty, and anxiety-related disorders (such as Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, Panic Disorder, phobias, and Social Anxiety Disorder). The most common comorbid condition reported by the ADHD group was depression (Fig 1). Specific to the ADHD group, 14.3% reported being diagnosed with alcoholism and 9.5% with substance use/abuse (other than alcohol), prior to being diagnosed with ADHD.

Bottom Line: ADHD respondents reported significantly more comorbid depression, sleep difficulties, headaches, and anxiety than non-ADHD controls.Respondents with ADHD reported a significantly higher degree of health-related work impairment compared to non-ADHD, with greater absenteeism and decreased work productivity.Japanese adults with ADHD face a substantial burden of illness, including lower overall health status, increased number of comorbidities, greater healthcare utilization, and significant health-related occupational impairment compared to those without ADHD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, Juntendo University Shizuoka Hospital, Izunokunishi City, Shizuoka, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: This study compared the sociodemographic characteristics, comorbidities, healthcare resource utilization, and work productivity among Japanese adults who reported being diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to those of a non-ADHD control population.

Methods: Data for this study were captured from an online survey of adults in Japan conducted by Kantar Health using consumer panels. A total of 84 survey participants reported they had received a diagnosis of ADHD from a physician. Survey responses pertaining to functional status and resource utilization from this ADHD group were compared to those from a non-ADHD control group of 100 participants. Comparisons between the ADHD and non-ADHD groups were made using chi-square tests for categorical variables and t-tests for continuous variables.

Results: Participants in the ADHD group were on average slightly younger with a higher proportion of males. ADHD respondents reported significantly more comorbid depression, sleep difficulties, headaches, and anxiety than non-ADHD controls. Over the previous 6 months, the ADHD group made more visits to healthcare providers and the emergency room, and had more hospitalizations than non-ADHD controls. The ADHD group also rated their overall health status lower than the non-ADHD control group. Respondents with ADHD reported a significantly higher degree of health-related work impairment compared to non-ADHD, with greater absenteeism and decreased work productivity. The ADHD group indicated their symptoms negatively impacted relationships, self-esteem, and regular daily activities.

Conclusions: Japanese adults with ADHD face a substantial burden of illness, including lower overall health status, increased number of comorbidities, greater healthcare utilization, and significant health-related occupational impairment compared to those without ADHD. Additional research is needed to develop a better understanding of both the consequences and treatment approaches for Japanese adults with ADHD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus