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Revisiting the Diego Blood Group System in Amerindians: Evidence for Gene-Culture Comigration.

Bégat C, Bailly P, Chiaroni J, Mazières S - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Closer study revealed a correlation that this unequal distribution was correlated with language, suggesting that linguistic divergence was a driving force in the expansion of DI*A among Native Americans.Distribution of DI*A in subtropical areas indicated that gene and culture exchanges were more intense within than between ecozones.Bolstering the utility of classical genetic markers in biological anthropology, the present study of the expansion of Diego blood group genetic polymorphism in Native Americans shows strong evidence of gene-culture comigration.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, EFS, ADES UMR 7268, 13916 Marseille, France.

ABSTRACT
Six decades ago the DI*A allele of the Diego blood group system was instrumental in proving Native American populations originated from Siberia. Since then, it has received scant attention. The present study was undertaken to reappraise distribution of the DI*A allele in 144 Native American populations based on current knowledge. Using analysis of variance tests, frequency distribution was studied according to geographical, environmental, and cultural parameters. Frequencies were highest in Amazonian populations. In contrast, DI*A was undetectable in subarctic, Fuegian, Panamanian, Chaco and Yanomama populations. Closer study revealed a correlation that this unequal distribution was correlated with language, suggesting that linguistic divergence was a driving force in the expansion of DI*A among Native Americans. The absence of DI*A in circumpolar Eskimo-Aleut and Na-Dene speakers was consistent with a late migratory event confined to North America. Distribution of DI*A in subtropical areas indicated that gene and culture exchanges were more intense within than between ecozones. Bolstering the utility of classical genetic markers in biological anthropology, the present study of the expansion of Diego blood group genetic polymorphism in Native Americans shows strong evidence of gene-culture comigration.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Spatial pattern of correlation of DI*A allele frequencies.Dotted lines indicate a 95% probability interval obtained with 1000 permutations for a  hypothesis of no spatial structure.
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pone.0132211.g002: Spatial pattern of correlation of DI*A allele frequencies.Dotted lines indicate a 95% probability interval obtained with 1000 permutations for a hypothesis of no spatial structure.

Mentions: Fig 1 shows the highly contrasting geographic distribution of DI*A allele frequency in the Americas based on study of 144 Native American populations. High frequencies were observed in the Peruvian Andes, on the Guyanese Plateau, in the southeastern Amazonian Basin, in a region comprising the Brazilian state of Pará, and along the Tapajos, Xingu and Araguaia tributaries of the Amazon River. Low frequencies occurred mainly in North America, in Chaco and at southern tip of South America. The DI*A allele was totally absent in the Arctic (Eskimo and Tlingit), Panama Isthmus (Bribri and Teribe), Tierra de Fuego (Alacalufe), and a few pocket areas in North America (Cherokee), Northern Brazil/Southern Venezuela (Ninam and Yanomama), and the Chaco area (Ayoreo, Zamucoan). Fig 2 summarizes analysis of the correlation between differences in DI*A frequency and geographic distance in paired populations. The observed pattern refutes the correlation hypothesis (p<0.001) by showing an increasingly significant positive correlation as the distance between populations decrease. This finding suggests the existence of locations with similar genetic features, i.e., where populations have similar DI*A allele frequencies.


Revisiting the Diego Blood Group System in Amerindians: Evidence for Gene-Culture Comigration.

Bégat C, Bailly P, Chiaroni J, Mazières S - PLoS ONE (2015)

Spatial pattern of correlation of DI*A allele frequencies.Dotted lines indicate a 95% probability interval obtained with 1000 permutations for a  hypothesis of no spatial structure.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493026&req=5

pone.0132211.g002: Spatial pattern of correlation of DI*A allele frequencies.Dotted lines indicate a 95% probability interval obtained with 1000 permutations for a hypothesis of no spatial structure.
Mentions: Fig 1 shows the highly contrasting geographic distribution of DI*A allele frequency in the Americas based on study of 144 Native American populations. High frequencies were observed in the Peruvian Andes, on the Guyanese Plateau, in the southeastern Amazonian Basin, in a region comprising the Brazilian state of Pará, and along the Tapajos, Xingu and Araguaia tributaries of the Amazon River. Low frequencies occurred mainly in North America, in Chaco and at southern tip of South America. The DI*A allele was totally absent in the Arctic (Eskimo and Tlingit), Panama Isthmus (Bribri and Teribe), Tierra de Fuego (Alacalufe), and a few pocket areas in North America (Cherokee), Northern Brazil/Southern Venezuela (Ninam and Yanomama), and the Chaco area (Ayoreo, Zamucoan). Fig 2 summarizes analysis of the correlation between differences in DI*A frequency and geographic distance in paired populations. The observed pattern refutes the correlation hypothesis (p<0.001) by showing an increasingly significant positive correlation as the distance between populations decrease. This finding suggests the existence of locations with similar genetic features, i.e., where populations have similar DI*A allele frequencies.

Bottom Line: Closer study revealed a correlation that this unequal distribution was correlated with language, suggesting that linguistic divergence was a driving force in the expansion of DI*A among Native Americans.Distribution of DI*A in subtropical areas indicated that gene and culture exchanges were more intense within than between ecozones.Bolstering the utility of classical genetic markers in biological anthropology, the present study of the expansion of Diego blood group genetic polymorphism in Native Americans shows strong evidence of gene-culture comigration.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, EFS, ADES UMR 7268, 13916 Marseille, France.

ABSTRACT
Six decades ago the DI*A allele of the Diego blood group system was instrumental in proving Native American populations originated from Siberia. Since then, it has received scant attention. The present study was undertaken to reappraise distribution of the DI*A allele in 144 Native American populations based on current knowledge. Using analysis of variance tests, frequency distribution was studied according to geographical, environmental, and cultural parameters. Frequencies were highest in Amazonian populations. In contrast, DI*A was undetectable in subarctic, Fuegian, Panamanian, Chaco and Yanomama populations. Closer study revealed a correlation that this unequal distribution was correlated with language, suggesting that linguistic divergence was a driving force in the expansion of DI*A among Native Americans. The absence of DI*A in circumpolar Eskimo-Aleut and Na-Dene speakers was consistent with a late migratory event confined to North America. Distribution of DI*A in subtropical areas indicated that gene and culture exchanges were more intense within than between ecozones. Bolstering the utility of classical genetic markers in biological anthropology, the present study of the expansion of Diego blood group genetic polymorphism in Native Americans shows strong evidence of gene-culture comigration.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus