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Lifetime Prevalence and Factors Associated with Head Injury among Older People in Low and Middle Income Countries: A 10/66 Study.

Khan A, Prince M, Brayne C, Prina AM - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Prevalence ratios (PR) from Poisson regressions were used to identify associated risk factors.Being male (PR: 1.6, 95% CI: 1.29-1.82), younger (PR: 0.95, 95% CI: 0.92-0.99), with lower education (PR 0.91, 95% CI: 0.86-0.96), and having fewer assets (PR 0.92, 95% CI: 0.88-0.96), was associated with a higher prevalence of TBI when pooling estimates across sites.Considering the growing impact of TBI on health resources in these countries, there is an urgent need for further research.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Public Health, University of Cambridge, Forvie Site, Robinson Way, Cambridge, CB2 0SR, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a growing public health problem around the world, yet there is little information on the prevalence of head injury in low and middle income countries (LMICs). We utilised data collected by the 10/66 research group to investigate the lifetime prevalence of head injury in defined sites in low and middle income countries, its risk factors and its relationship with disability.

Methods: We analysed data from one-phase cross-sectional surveys of all residents aged 65 years and older (n = 16430) distributed across twelve sites in eight low and middle income countries (China, Cuba, Dominican Republic, India, Venezuela, Mexico, Peru, and Puerto Rico). Self-reported cases of head injury with loss of consciousness were identified during the interview. A sensitivity analysis including data provided by informants of people with dementia was also used to estimate the impact of this information on the estimates. Prevalence ratios (PR) from Poisson regressions were used to identify associated risk factors.

Results: The standardised lifetime prevalence of TBI ranged from 0.3% in China to 14.6% in rural Mexico and Venezuela. Being male (PR: 1.6, 95% CI: 1.29-1.82), younger (PR: 0.95, 95% CI: 0.92-0.99), with lower education (PR 0.91, 95% CI: 0.86-0.96), and having fewer assets (PR 0.92, 95% CI: 0.88-0.96), was associated with a higher prevalence of TBI when pooling estimates across sites.

Discussion: Our analysis revealed that the prevalence of TBI in LMICs is similar to that of developed nations. Considering the growing impact of TBI on health resources in these countries, there is an urgent need for further research.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Distribution of age at time of head injury.
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pone.0132229.g001: Distribution of age at time of head injury.

Mentions: We found a bi-modal distribution of age of head injury with a peak during adolescence and a second one around age 60 (Fig 1.).


Lifetime Prevalence and Factors Associated with Head Injury among Older People in Low and Middle Income Countries: A 10/66 Study.

Khan A, Prince M, Brayne C, Prina AM - PLoS ONE (2015)

Distribution of age at time of head injury.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493012&req=5

pone.0132229.g001: Distribution of age at time of head injury.
Mentions: We found a bi-modal distribution of age of head injury with a peak during adolescence and a second one around age 60 (Fig 1.).

Bottom Line: Prevalence ratios (PR) from Poisson regressions were used to identify associated risk factors.Being male (PR: 1.6, 95% CI: 1.29-1.82), younger (PR: 0.95, 95% CI: 0.92-0.99), with lower education (PR 0.91, 95% CI: 0.86-0.96), and having fewer assets (PR 0.92, 95% CI: 0.88-0.96), was associated with a higher prevalence of TBI when pooling estimates across sites.Considering the growing impact of TBI on health resources in these countries, there is an urgent need for further research.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Public Health, University of Cambridge, Forvie Site, Robinson Way, Cambridge, CB2 0SR, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a growing public health problem around the world, yet there is little information on the prevalence of head injury in low and middle income countries (LMICs). We utilised data collected by the 10/66 research group to investigate the lifetime prevalence of head injury in defined sites in low and middle income countries, its risk factors and its relationship with disability.

Methods: We analysed data from one-phase cross-sectional surveys of all residents aged 65 years and older (n = 16430) distributed across twelve sites in eight low and middle income countries (China, Cuba, Dominican Republic, India, Venezuela, Mexico, Peru, and Puerto Rico). Self-reported cases of head injury with loss of consciousness were identified during the interview. A sensitivity analysis including data provided by informants of people with dementia was also used to estimate the impact of this information on the estimates. Prevalence ratios (PR) from Poisson regressions were used to identify associated risk factors.

Results: The standardised lifetime prevalence of TBI ranged from 0.3% in China to 14.6% in rural Mexico and Venezuela. Being male (PR: 1.6, 95% CI: 1.29-1.82), younger (PR: 0.95, 95% CI: 0.92-0.99), with lower education (PR 0.91, 95% CI: 0.86-0.96), and having fewer assets (PR 0.92, 95% CI: 0.88-0.96), was associated with a higher prevalence of TBI when pooling estimates across sites.

Discussion: Our analysis revealed that the prevalence of TBI in LMICs is similar to that of developed nations. Considering the growing impact of TBI on health resources in these countries, there is an urgent need for further research.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus