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Association of MnSOD AA Genotype with the Progression of Prostate Cancer.

Iguchi T, Wang CY, Delongchamps NB, Kato M, Tamada S, Yamasaki T, de la Roza G, Nakatani T, Haas GP - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: MnSOD AA, as compared with the other genotypes (VA and VV together), was associated with significant prostate cancer across all ages, odds ratio (OR) 2.34, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.99-5.49, and in men older than 69 years (OR 4.89, 95% CI 1.51-15.8), but not in men younger than 70 years.MnSOD polymorphism is strongly associated with the clinical significance of prostate cancer in men older than 69 years, but not in men younger than 70 years suggesting that oxidative stress may be involved in the progression of the disease.MnSOD may be a clinically useful marker to predict the potential of progression of prostate cancer.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, New York, United States of America; Department of Urology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To investigate whether manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) genetic polymorphism is associated with the clinical significance of prostate cancer.

Materials and methods: Prostates were obtained from 194 deceased men 45 years or older who did not have a history of prostate cancer. Serial sections and histological examinations of the prostate were performed. The MnSOD genotypes of the specimens were determined by polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis.

Results: Of the 194 men, 31 and 26 had clinically insignificant and significant prostate cancer. Clinically significant cancer comprised 29% and 58% of the cancers in men <70 and >70 years old, respectively. The age-specific proportion of significant cancer significantly increased with the advance of age (p<0.001). MnSOD AA, as compared with the other genotypes (VA and VV together), was associated with significant prostate cancer across all ages, odds ratio (OR) 2.34, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.99-5.49, and in men older than 69 years (OR 4.89, 95% CI 1.51-15.8), but not in men younger than 70 years. The genotype was not associated with clinically insignificant cancer regardless of age. The comparison between significant and insignificant cancer, the OR (95% CI) for MnSOD AA was 5.04 (1.05-24.2) (sensitivity 0.57, specificity 0.78, positive predictive value 0.78) in men older than 69 years.

Conclusions: MnSOD polymorphism is strongly associated with the clinical significance of prostate cancer in men older than 69 years, but not in men younger than 70 years suggesting that oxidative stress may be involved in the progression of the disease. MnSOD may be a clinically useful marker to predict the potential of progression of prostate cancer.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Age-specific prevalence of significant (red bar) and insignificant (blue bar) PCa.n = the number of total subjects in each group. The number on top of each bar is for the number of cases in each age group. The age-specific proportion of specific cancer (no. of significant cancers/no. of both significant and insignificant cancers) was significantly increased with the advance of age as analyzed by logistic regression (p<0.001).
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pone.0131325.g001: Age-specific prevalence of significant (red bar) and insignificant (blue bar) PCa.n = the number of total subjects in each group. The number on top of each bar is for the number of cases in each age group. The age-specific proportion of specific cancer (no. of significant cancers/no. of both significant and insignificant cancers) was significantly increased with the advance of age as analyzed by logistic regression (p<0.001).

Mentions: Of the 194 men, 57 (29.4%) had PCa and 26 (13.4%) were clinically significant PCa. Among these clinically significant PCa, 20 had tumor size greater than 0.5 cm3, 20 had Gleason score >6, and only a single tumor demonstrated capsular invasion (S1 Table). Fig 1 shows the age-specific prevalence of significant and insignificant PCa. The prevalence of significant cancer increased with the advance of age. On the contrary the prevalence of insignificant cancer slightly increased with the advance of age but drastically decreased in men older than 79 years. The age-specific proportion of significant PCa significantly increased with the advance of age (p<0.001, Fig 1).


Association of MnSOD AA Genotype with the Progression of Prostate Cancer.

Iguchi T, Wang CY, Delongchamps NB, Kato M, Tamada S, Yamasaki T, de la Roza G, Nakatani T, Haas GP - PLoS ONE (2015)

Age-specific prevalence of significant (red bar) and insignificant (blue bar) PCa.n = the number of total subjects in each group. The number on top of each bar is for the number of cases in each age group. The age-specific proportion of specific cancer (no. of significant cancers/no. of both significant and insignificant cancers) was significantly increased with the advance of age as analyzed by logistic regression (p<0.001).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4492976&req=5

pone.0131325.g001: Age-specific prevalence of significant (red bar) and insignificant (blue bar) PCa.n = the number of total subjects in each group. The number on top of each bar is for the number of cases in each age group. The age-specific proportion of specific cancer (no. of significant cancers/no. of both significant and insignificant cancers) was significantly increased with the advance of age as analyzed by logistic regression (p<0.001).
Mentions: Of the 194 men, 57 (29.4%) had PCa and 26 (13.4%) were clinically significant PCa. Among these clinically significant PCa, 20 had tumor size greater than 0.5 cm3, 20 had Gleason score >6, and only a single tumor demonstrated capsular invasion (S1 Table). Fig 1 shows the age-specific prevalence of significant and insignificant PCa. The prevalence of significant cancer increased with the advance of age. On the contrary the prevalence of insignificant cancer slightly increased with the advance of age but drastically decreased in men older than 79 years. The age-specific proportion of significant PCa significantly increased with the advance of age (p<0.001, Fig 1).

Bottom Line: MnSOD AA, as compared with the other genotypes (VA and VV together), was associated with significant prostate cancer across all ages, odds ratio (OR) 2.34, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.99-5.49, and in men older than 69 years (OR 4.89, 95% CI 1.51-15.8), but not in men younger than 70 years.MnSOD polymorphism is strongly associated with the clinical significance of prostate cancer in men older than 69 years, but not in men younger than 70 years suggesting that oxidative stress may be involved in the progression of the disease.MnSOD may be a clinically useful marker to predict the potential of progression of prostate cancer.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, New York, United States of America; Department of Urology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To investigate whether manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) genetic polymorphism is associated with the clinical significance of prostate cancer.

Materials and methods: Prostates were obtained from 194 deceased men 45 years or older who did not have a history of prostate cancer. Serial sections and histological examinations of the prostate were performed. The MnSOD genotypes of the specimens were determined by polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis.

Results: Of the 194 men, 31 and 26 had clinically insignificant and significant prostate cancer. Clinically significant cancer comprised 29% and 58% of the cancers in men <70 and >70 years old, respectively. The age-specific proportion of significant cancer significantly increased with the advance of age (p<0.001). MnSOD AA, as compared with the other genotypes (VA and VV together), was associated with significant prostate cancer across all ages, odds ratio (OR) 2.34, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.99-5.49, and in men older than 69 years (OR 4.89, 95% CI 1.51-15.8), but not in men younger than 70 years. The genotype was not associated with clinically insignificant cancer regardless of age. The comparison between significant and insignificant cancer, the OR (95% CI) for MnSOD AA was 5.04 (1.05-24.2) (sensitivity 0.57, specificity 0.78, positive predictive value 0.78) in men older than 69 years.

Conclusions: MnSOD polymorphism is strongly associated with the clinical significance of prostate cancer in men older than 69 years, but not in men younger than 70 years suggesting that oxidative stress may be involved in the progression of the disease. MnSOD may be a clinically useful marker to predict the potential of progression of prostate cancer.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus