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How to Establish and Follow up a Large Prospective Cohort Study in the 21st Century--Lessons from UK COSMOS.

Toledano MB, Smith RB, Brook JP, Douglass M, Elliott P - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Web-based e-consent and data collection should be considered in large scale observational studies, as they offer a streamlined experience which benefits both participants and researchers and save costs.Commercial providers of register and marketing data, smartphones, apps, email, social media, and the internet offer innovative possibilities for identifying, recruiting and following up cohorts.Thus a more streamlined experience to the benefit of both research participants and researchers becomes achievable.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: MRC-PHE Centre for Environment and Health, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, St Mary's Campus, London, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
Large-scale prospective cohort studies are invaluable in epidemiology, but they are increasingly difficult and costly to establish and follow-up. More efficient methods for recruitment, data collection and follow-up are essential if such studies are to remain feasible with limited public and research funds. Here, we discuss how these challenges were addressed in the UK COSMOS cohort study where fixed budget and limited time frame necessitated new approaches to consent and recruitment between 2009-2012. Web-based e-consent and data collection should be considered in large scale observational studies, as they offer a streamlined experience which benefits both participants and researchers and save costs. Commercial providers of register and marketing data, smartphones, apps, email, social media, and the internet offer innovative possibilities for identifying, recruiting and following up cohorts. Using examples from UK COSMOS, this article sets out the dos and don'ts for today's cohort studies and provides a guide on how best to take advantage of new technologies and innovative methods to simplify logistics and minimise costs. Thus a more streamlined experience to the benefit of both research participants and researchers becomes achievable.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Characteristics of participants from two major recruitment campaigns to the UK COSMOS study (Phases 2 and 7).Legend: Blue bars represent Phase 2, red bars represent Phase 7. Fig 2 Footnotes: Phase 2 used a mobile phone subscriber sampling frame, letter invitation, web-based consent, registration, and questionnaire and a prize draw incentive, and recruited N = 67,793. Phase 7 used an electoral register sampling frame, letter invitation, web-based consent, registration, and questionnaire and a gift voucher incentive, and recruited N = 36,316. Together Phases 2 and 7 recruited N = 104,109. The profile of participants presented here is based on N = 67627 from Phase 2 and N = 36218 from Phase 7, i.e. excluding 264 withdrawals. With the exception of socio-economic classification, the percentages calculated exclude Missing from the denominator. N for missing are as follows: Phase 2: Sex N = 290, Age group N = 306, Ethnicity N = 9205, Highest Educational Qualification N = 9124, Smoking N = 8404; Phase 7: Sex N = 2, Age group N = 9, Ethnicity N = 5135, Highest Educational Qualification N = 5083, Smoking N = 4760. For socio-economic classification Missing are included in the Not classified category, which also contains people who never worked or were long-term unemployed and therefore could not be assigned a classification based on occupation.
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pone.0131521.g002: Characteristics of participants from two major recruitment campaigns to the UK COSMOS study (Phases 2 and 7).Legend: Blue bars represent Phase 2, red bars represent Phase 7. Fig 2 Footnotes: Phase 2 used a mobile phone subscriber sampling frame, letter invitation, web-based consent, registration, and questionnaire and a prize draw incentive, and recruited N = 67,793. Phase 7 used an electoral register sampling frame, letter invitation, web-based consent, registration, and questionnaire and a gift voucher incentive, and recruited N = 36,316. Together Phases 2 and 7 recruited N = 104,109. The profile of participants presented here is based on N = 67627 from Phase 2 and N = 36218 from Phase 7, i.e. excluding 264 withdrawals. With the exception of socio-economic classification, the percentages calculated exclude Missing from the denominator. N for missing are as follows: Phase 2: Sex N = 290, Age group N = 306, Ethnicity N = 9205, Highest Educational Qualification N = 9124, Smoking N = 8404; Phase 7: Sex N = 2, Age group N = 9, Ethnicity N = 5135, Highest Educational Qualification N = 5083, Smoking N = 4760. For socio-economic classification Missing are included in the Not classified category, which also contains people who never worked or were long-term unemployed and therefore could not be assigned a classification based on occupation.

Mentions: Sex, age, ethnic, socio-economic status (SES) and smoking distributions were broadly similar for our two major recruitment campaigns, Phases 2 and 7 (Fig 2). The main difference was for age, with slightly lower mean age in Phase 7 vs Phase 2 (43 and 46 years respectively). Participants in both campaigns were predominantly White, with two-thirds from the highest social class, and highly educated (53% have degree and/or professional qualifications).


How to Establish and Follow up a Large Prospective Cohort Study in the 21st Century--Lessons from UK COSMOS.

Toledano MB, Smith RB, Brook JP, Douglass M, Elliott P - PLoS ONE (2015)

Characteristics of participants from two major recruitment campaigns to the UK COSMOS study (Phases 2 and 7).Legend: Blue bars represent Phase 2, red bars represent Phase 7. Fig 2 Footnotes: Phase 2 used a mobile phone subscriber sampling frame, letter invitation, web-based consent, registration, and questionnaire and a prize draw incentive, and recruited N = 67,793. Phase 7 used an electoral register sampling frame, letter invitation, web-based consent, registration, and questionnaire and a gift voucher incentive, and recruited N = 36,316. Together Phases 2 and 7 recruited N = 104,109. The profile of participants presented here is based on N = 67627 from Phase 2 and N = 36218 from Phase 7, i.e. excluding 264 withdrawals. With the exception of socio-economic classification, the percentages calculated exclude Missing from the denominator. N for missing are as follows: Phase 2: Sex N = 290, Age group N = 306, Ethnicity N = 9205, Highest Educational Qualification N = 9124, Smoking N = 8404; Phase 7: Sex N = 2, Age group N = 9, Ethnicity N = 5135, Highest Educational Qualification N = 5083, Smoking N = 4760. For socio-economic classification Missing are included in the Not classified category, which also contains people who never worked or were long-term unemployed and therefore could not be assigned a classification based on occupation.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4492973&req=5

pone.0131521.g002: Characteristics of participants from two major recruitment campaigns to the UK COSMOS study (Phases 2 and 7).Legend: Blue bars represent Phase 2, red bars represent Phase 7. Fig 2 Footnotes: Phase 2 used a mobile phone subscriber sampling frame, letter invitation, web-based consent, registration, and questionnaire and a prize draw incentive, and recruited N = 67,793. Phase 7 used an electoral register sampling frame, letter invitation, web-based consent, registration, and questionnaire and a gift voucher incentive, and recruited N = 36,316. Together Phases 2 and 7 recruited N = 104,109. The profile of participants presented here is based on N = 67627 from Phase 2 and N = 36218 from Phase 7, i.e. excluding 264 withdrawals. With the exception of socio-economic classification, the percentages calculated exclude Missing from the denominator. N for missing are as follows: Phase 2: Sex N = 290, Age group N = 306, Ethnicity N = 9205, Highest Educational Qualification N = 9124, Smoking N = 8404; Phase 7: Sex N = 2, Age group N = 9, Ethnicity N = 5135, Highest Educational Qualification N = 5083, Smoking N = 4760. For socio-economic classification Missing are included in the Not classified category, which also contains people who never worked or were long-term unemployed and therefore could not be assigned a classification based on occupation.
Mentions: Sex, age, ethnic, socio-economic status (SES) and smoking distributions were broadly similar for our two major recruitment campaigns, Phases 2 and 7 (Fig 2). The main difference was for age, with slightly lower mean age in Phase 7 vs Phase 2 (43 and 46 years respectively). Participants in both campaigns were predominantly White, with two-thirds from the highest social class, and highly educated (53% have degree and/or professional qualifications).

Bottom Line: Web-based e-consent and data collection should be considered in large scale observational studies, as they offer a streamlined experience which benefits both participants and researchers and save costs.Commercial providers of register and marketing data, smartphones, apps, email, social media, and the internet offer innovative possibilities for identifying, recruiting and following up cohorts.Thus a more streamlined experience to the benefit of both research participants and researchers becomes achievable.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: MRC-PHE Centre for Environment and Health, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, St Mary's Campus, London, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
Large-scale prospective cohort studies are invaluable in epidemiology, but they are increasingly difficult and costly to establish and follow-up. More efficient methods for recruitment, data collection and follow-up are essential if such studies are to remain feasible with limited public and research funds. Here, we discuss how these challenges were addressed in the UK COSMOS cohort study where fixed budget and limited time frame necessitated new approaches to consent and recruitment between 2009-2012. Web-based e-consent and data collection should be considered in large scale observational studies, as they offer a streamlined experience which benefits both participants and researchers and save costs. Commercial providers of register and marketing data, smartphones, apps, email, social media, and the internet offer innovative possibilities for identifying, recruiting and following up cohorts. Using examples from UK COSMOS, this article sets out the dos and don'ts for today's cohort studies and provides a guide on how best to take advantage of new technologies and innovative methods to simplify logistics and minimise costs. Thus a more streamlined experience to the benefit of both research participants and researchers becomes achievable.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus