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Indwelling versus Intermittent Urinary Catheterization following Total Joint Arthroplasty: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Zhang W, Liu A, Hu D, Xue D, Li C, Zhang K, Ma H, Yan S, Pan Z - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Additionally, a meta-regression analysis, as well as a sensitivity analysis, was performed to evaluate the heterogeneity.Nine RCTs with 1771 patients were included in this meta-analysis.Level I.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopedics, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, People's Republic of China.

ABSTRACT

Objective: The purpose of this study is to compare the rates of urinary tract infection (UTI) and postoperative urinary retention (POUR) in patients undergoing lower limb arthroplasty after either indwelling urinary catheterization or intermittent urinary catheterization.

Methods: We conducted a meta-analysis of relevant randomized controlled trials (RCT) to compare the rates of UTI and POUR in patients undergoing total joint arthroplasty after either indwelling urinary catheterization or intermittent urinary catheterization. A comprehensive search was carried out to identify RCTs. Study-specific risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were pooled. Additionally, a meta-regression analysis, as well as a sensitivity analysis, was performed to evaluate the heterogeneity.

Results: Nine RCTs with 1771 patients were included in this meta-analysis. The results showed that there was no significant difference in the rate of UTIs between indwelling catheterization and intermittent catheterization groups (P>0.05). Moreover, indwelling catheterization reduced the risk of POUR, versus intermittent catheterization, in total joint surgery (P<0.01).

Conclusions: Based on the results of the meta-analysis, indwelling urinary catheterization, removed 24-48 h postoperatively, was superior to intermittent catheterization in preventing POUR. Furthermore, indwelling urinary catheterization with removal 24 to 48 hours postoperatively did not increase the risk of UTI. In patients with multiple risk factors for POUR undergoing total joint arthroplasty of lower limb, the preferred option should be indwelling urinary catheterization removed 24-48 h postoperatively.

Level of evidence: Level I.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Egger’s publication bias plot.
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pone.0130636.g005: Egger’s publication bias plot.

Mentions: The results of the Begg’s test (P = 0.175, continuity corrected) and the Egger’s test (P = 0.278; Fig 5) showed that there was no publication bias in this study.


Indwelling versus Intermittent Urinary Catheterization following Total Joint Arthroplasty: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Zhang W, Liu A, Hu D, Xue D, Li C, Zhang K, Ma H, Yan S, Pan Z - PLoS ONE (2015)

Egger’s publication bias plot.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4492963&req=5

pone.0130636.g005: Egger’s publication bias plot.
Mentions: The results of the Begg’s test (P = 0.175, continuity corrected) and the Egger’s test (P = 0.278; Fig 5) showed that there was no publication bias in this study.

Bottom Line: Additionally, a meta-regression analysis, as well as a sensitivity analysis, was performed to evaluate the heterogeneity.Nine RCTs with 1771 patients were included in this meta-analysis.Level I.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopedics, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, People's Republic of China.

ABSTRACT

Objective: The purpose of this study is to compare the rates of urinary tract infection (UTI) and postoperative urinary retention (POUR) in patients undergoing lower limb arthroplasty after either indwelling urinary catheterization or intermittent urinary catheterization.

Methods: We conducted a meta-analysis of relevant randomized controlled trials (RCT) to compare the rates of UTI and POUR in patients undergoing total joint arthroplasty after either indwelling urinary catheterization or intermittent urinary catheterization. A comprehensive search was carried out to identify RCTs. Study-specific risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were pooled. Additionally, a meta-regression analysis, as well as a sensitivity analysis, was performed to evaluate the heterogeneity.

Results: Nine RCTs with 1771 patients were included in this meta-analysis. The results showed that there was no significant difference in the rate of UTIs between indwelling catheterization and intermittent catheterization groups (P>0.05). Moreover, indwelling catheterization reduced the risk of POUR, versus intermittent catheterization, in total joint surgery (P<0.01).

Conclusions: Based on the results of the meta-analysis, indwelling urinary catheterization, removed 24-48 h postoperatively, was superior to intermittent catheterization in preventing POUR. Furthermore, indwelling urinary catheterization with removal 24 to 48 hours postoperatively did not increase the risk of UTI. In patients with multiple risk factors for POUR undergoing total joint arthroplasty of lower limb, the preferred option should be indwelling urinary catheterization removed 24-48 h postoperatively.

Level of evidence: Level I.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus