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Maternal Vitamin D Status and Its Related Factors in Pregnant Women in Bangkok, Thailand.

Pratumvinit B, Wongkrajang P, Wataganara T, Hanyongyuth S, Nimmannit A, Chatsiricharoenkul S, Manonukul K, Reesukumal K - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: The prevalence of hypovitaminosis D [defined as 25(OH)D <75 nmol/L] in pregnant women at delivery was 75.5% (95% confidence interval (CI), 67.7-82.2%).The mean 25(OH)D concentration was 61.6 ± 19.3 nmol/L.The correlation between 25(OH)D and iPTH was weak (r = -0.29, P<0.01).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Clinical Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand.

ABSTRACT

Background: There are few data focusing on the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in tropical countries.

Objectives: We determined the vitamin D status in pregnant women and examined the factors associated with vitamin D deficiency.

Design and methods: A cross-sectional study of 147 pregnant Thai women aged 18-45 years at Siriraj Hospital (a university hospital in Bangkok, Thailand) was undertaken. Clinical data and plasma levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), calcium, albumin, phosphate and magnesium were obtained in pregnant women at delivery.

Results: The prevalence of hypovitaminosis D [defined as 25(OH)D <75 nmol/L] in pregnant women at delivery was 75.5% (95% confidence interval (CI), 67.7-82.2%). Of these, vitamin D insufficiency [defined as 25(OH)D 50-74.9 nmol/L] was found in 41.5% (95% CI, 33.4-49.9%) and vitamin D deficiency [25(OH)D <50 nmol/L] was found in 34.0% (95% CI, 26.4-42.3%) of women. The mean 25(OH)D concentration was 61.6 ± 19.3 nmol/L. The correlation between 25(OH)D and iPTH was weak (r = -0.29, P<0.01). Factors associated with vitamin D deficiency by multiple logistic regression were: pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI in kg/m2, odds ratio (OR), 0.88, 95% CI 0.80-0.97, P = 0.01) and season of blood collection (winter vs. rainy, OR, 2.62, 95% CI 1.18-5.85, P = 0.02).

Conclusions: Vitamin D deficiency is common among pregnant Thai women. The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency increased in women who had a lower pre-pregnancy BMI and whose blood was collected in the winter. Vitamin D supplementation may need to be implemented as routine antenatal care.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Scatter plot showing the relationship between maternal intact parathyroid hormone and 25-hydroxyvitamin D level.The maternal plasma level of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D]showed a weakly negative correlation with the maternal plasma level of intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), n = 147. Linear regression equation: iPTH = –0.0193[25(OH)D] + 4.3884. (Pearson’s r = –0.29, P<0.01)
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pone.0131126.g001: Scatter plot showing the relationship between maternal intact parathyroid hormone and 25-hydroxyvitamin D level.The maternal plasma level of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D]showed a weakly negative correlation with the maternal plasma level of intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), n = 147. Linear regression equation: iPTH = –0.0193[25(OH)D] + 4.3884. (Pearson’s r = –0.29, P<0.01)

Mentions: The mean concentration of 25(OH)D was 61.6±19.3 (range, 18.8–124.9) nmol/L. Thirty-six (24.5%; 95% CI, 17.8–32.3%) women had vitamin D sufficiency (25(OH)D ≥75 nmol/L). Sixty-one (41.5%; 95% CI, 33.4–49.9%) women had vitamin D insufficiency (25(OH)D 50–74.9 nmol/L), and 50 (34.0%; 95% CI, 26.4–42.3%) women had vitamin D deficiency (25(OH) D <50 nmol/L). One woman had 25(OH)D <25 nmol/L. The median (IQR) level of iPTH was 2.98 (2.27–3.91) pmol/L. An elevated level of iPTH (>6.89 pmol/L) was found in 4% (2/50) of women with vitamin D deficiency, but not in subjects with 25(OH)D ≥50 nmol/L. The maternal plasma level of 25(OH)D showed a weakly negative correlation with the maternal plasma level of iPTH (r = –0.29, P<0.01) (Fig 1).


Maternal Vitamin D Status and Its Related Factors in Pregnant Women in Bangkok, Thailand.

Pratumvinit B, Wongkrajang P, Wataganara T, Hanyongyuth S, Nimmannit A, Chatsiricharoenkul S, Manonukul K, Reesukumal K - PLoS ONE (2015)

Scatter plot showing the relationship between maternal intact parathyroid hormone and 25-hydroxyvitamin D level.The maternal plasma level of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D]showed a weakly negative correlation with the maternal plasma level of intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), n = 147. Linear regression equation: iPTH = –0.0193[25(OH)D] + 4.3884. (Pearson’s r = –0.29, P<0.01)
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4492949&req=5

pone.0131126.g001: Scatter plot showing the relationship between maternal intact parathyroid hormone and 25-hydroxyvitamin D level.The maternal plasma level of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D]showed a weakly negative correlation with the maternal plasma level of intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), n = 147. Linear regression equation: iPTH = –0.0193[25(OH)D] + 4.3884. (Pearson’s r = –0.29, P<0.01)
Mentions: The mean concentration of 25(OH)D was 61.6±19.3 (range, 18.8–124.9) nmol/L. Thirty-six (24.5%; 95% CI, 17.8–32.3%) women had vitamin D sufficiency (25(OH)D ≥75 nmol/L). Sixty-one (41.5%; 95% CI, 33.4–49.9%) women had vitamin D insufficiency (25(OH)D 50–74.9 nmol/L), and 50 (34.0%; 95% CI, 26.4–42.3%) women had vitamin D deficiency (25(OH) D <50 nmol/L). One woman had 25(OH)D <25 nmol/L. The median (IQR) level of iPTH was 2.98 (2.27–3.91) pmol/L. An elevated level of iPTH (>6.89 pmol/L) was found in 4% (2/50) of women with vitamin D deficiency, but not in subjects with 25(OH)D ≥50 nmol/L. The maternal plasma level of 25(OH)D showed a weakly negative correlation with the maternal plasma level of iPTH (r = –0.29, P<0.01) (Fig 1).

Bottom Line: The prevalence of hypovitaminosis D [defined as 25(OH)D <75 nmol/L] in pregnant women at delivery was 75.5% (95% confidence interval (CI), 67.7-82.2%).The mean 25(OH)D concentration was 61.6 ± 19.3 nmol/L.The correlation between 25(OH)D and iPTH was weak (r = -0.29, P<0.01).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Clinical Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand.

ABSTRACT

Background: There are few data focusing on the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in tropical countries.

Objectives: We determined the vitamin D status in pregnant women and examined the factors associated with vitamin D deficiency.

Design and methods: A cross-sectional study of 147 pregnant Thai women aged 18-45 years at Siriraj Hospital (a university hospital in Bangkok, Thailand) was undertaken. Clinical data and plasma levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), calcium, albumin, phosphate and magnesium were obtained in pregnant women at delivery.

Results: The prevalence of hypovitaminosis D [defined as 25(OH)D <75 nmol/L] in pregnant women at delivery was 75.5% (95% confidence interval (CI), 67.7-82.2%). Of these, vitamin D insufficiency [defined as 25(OH)D 50-74.9 nmol/L] was found in 41.5% (95% CI, 33.4-49.9%) and vitamin D deficiency [25(OH)D <50 nmol/L] was found in 34.0% (95% CI, 26.4-42.3%) of women. The mean 25(OH)D concentration was 61.6 ± 19.3 nmol/L. The correlation between 25(OH)D and iPTH was weak (r = -0.29, P<0.01). Factors associated with vitamin D deficiency by multiple logistic regression were: pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI in kg/m2, odds ratio (OR), 0.88, 95% CI 0.80-0.97, P = 0.01) and season of blood collection (winter vs. rainy, OR, 2.62, 95% CI 1.18-5.85, P = 0.02).

Conclusions: Vitamin D deficiency is common among pregnant Thai women. The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency increased in women who had a lower pre-pregnancy BMI and whose blood was collected in the winter. Vitamin D supplementation may need to be implemented as routine antenatal care.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus