Limits...
Replication and Analysis of Ebbinghaus' Forgetting Curve.

Murre JM, Dros J - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: One subject spent 70 hours learning lists and relearning them after 20 min, 1 hour, 9 hours, 1 day, 2 days, or 31 days.The results are similar to Ebbinghaus' original data.We conclude that the Ebbinghaus forgetting curve has indeed been replicated and that it is not completely smooth but most probably shows a jump upwards starting at the 24 hour data point.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
We present a successful replication of Ebbinghaus' classic forgetting curve from 1880 based on the method of savings. One subject spent 70 hours learning lists and relearning them after 20 min, 1 hour, 9 hours, 1 day, 2 days, or 31 days. The results are similar to Ebbinghaus' original data. We analyze the effects of serial position on forgetting and investigate what mathematical equations present a good fit to the Ebbinghaus forgetting curve and its replications. We conclude that the Ebbinghaus forgetting curve has indeed been replicated and that it is not completely smooth but most probably shows a jump upwards starting at the 24 hour data point.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Proportion correct as a function of retention interval on a logarithmic scale.(a) Proportion correct, averaged over all serial positions, shown with Dros’ savings scores for comparison. (b) Proportion correct curves for different groups of serial positions and for the average over all 13 positions.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4492928&req=5

pone.0120644.g007: Proportion correct as a function of retention interval on a logarithmic scale.(a) Proportion correct, averaged over all serial positions, shown with Dros’ savings scores for comparison. (b) Proportion correct curves for different groups of serial positions and for the average over all 13 positions.

Mentions: In Fig 6, it also seems that there is more forgetting with time in the middle positions. In Fig 7A, overall forgetting is shown, where the average of all positions is shown for each retention interval. Though there is forgetting, these curves are much shallower than the savings curves, which are shown as well for comparison. In Fig 7B, forgetting is shown for four groups of serial positions, indicating that indeed there is virtually no forgetting in the final positions 11 to 13. A regression line is nearly horizontal for positions 11–13 (slope -0.000183) and 1–2 (slope is -0.000112) with the largest decrease over time found in positions 3–8 (slope is -0.0114) and 9–10 (slope is -0.0119). The averaged curve has a slope of -0.00930, with all slopes calculated over the untransformed scores (i.e., not on a logarithmic scale).


Replication and Analysis of Ebbinghaus' Forgetting Curve.

Murre JM, Dros J - PLoS ONE (2015)

Proportion correct as a function of retention interval on a logarithmic scale.(a) Proportion correct, averaged over all serial positions, shown with Dros’ savings scores for comparison. (b) Proportion correct curves for different groups of serial positions and for the average over all 13 positions.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4492928&req=5

pone.0120644.g007: Proportion correct as a function of retention interval on a logarithmic scale.(a) Proportion correct, averaged over all serial positions, shown with Dros’ savings scores for comparison. (b) Proportion correct curves for different groups of serial positions and for the average over all 13 positions.
Mentions: In Fig 6, it also seems that there is more forgetting with time in the middle positions. In Fig 7A, overall forgetting is shown, where the average of all positions is shown for each retention interval. Though there is forgetting, these curves are much shallower than the savings curves, which are shown as well for comparison. In Fig 7B, forgetting is shown for four groups of serial positions, indicating that indeed there is virtually no forgetting in the final positions 11 to 13. A regression line is nearly horizontal for positions 11–13 (slope -0.000183) and 1–2 (slope is -0.000112) with the largest decrease over time found in positions 3–8 (slope is -0.0114) and 9–10 (slope is -0.0119). The averaged curve has a slope of -0.00930, with all slopes calculated over the untransformed scores (i.e., not on a logarithmic scale).

Bottom Line: One subject spent 70 hours learning lists and relearning them after 20 min, 1 hour, 9 hours, 1 day, 2 days, or 31 days.The results are similar to Ebbinghaus' original data.We conclude that the Ebbinghaus forgetting curve has indeed been replicated and that it is not completely smooth but most probably shows a jump upwards starting at the 24 hour data point.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
We present a successful replication of Ebbinghaus' classic forgetting curve from 1880 based on the method of savings. One subject spent 70 hours learning lists and relearning them after 20 min, 1 hour, 9 hours, 1 day, 2 days, or 31 days. The results are similar to Ebbinghaus' original data. We analyze the effects of serial position on forgetting and investigate what mathematical equations present a good fit to the Ebbinghaus forgetting curve and its replications. We conclude that the Ebbinghaus forgetting curve has indeed been replicated and that it is not completely smooth but most probably shows a jump upwards starting at the 24 hour data point.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus