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Replication and Analysis of Ebbinghaus' Forgetting Curve.

Murre JM, Dros J - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: One subject spent 70 hours learning lists and relearning them after 20 min, 1 hour, 9 hours, 1 day, 2 days, or 31 days.The results are similar to Ebbinghaus' original data.We conclude that the Ebbinghaus forgetting curve has indeed been replicated and that it is not completely smooth but most probably shows a jump upwards starting at the 24 hour data point.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
We present a successful replication of Ebbinghaus' classic forgetting curve from 1880 based on the method of savings. One subject spent 70 hours learning lists and relearning them after 20 min, 1 hour, 9 hours, 1 day, 2 days, or 31 days. The results are similar to Ebbinghaus' original data. We analyze the effects of serial position on forgetting and investigate what mathematical equations present a good fit to the Ebbinghaus forgetting curve and its replications. We conclude that the Ebbinghaus forgetting curve has indeed been replicated and that it is not completely smooth but most probably shows a jump upwards starting at the 24 hour data point.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Serial position for correct relearning scores for each retention interval and for the average of all retention intervals (see text for an explanation).
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pone.0120644.g006: Serial position for correct relearning scores for each retention interval and for the average of all retention intervals (see text for an explanation).

Mentions: In Fig 6, we have plotted the average serial position curves for each retention interval and for the grand average. Even if a correct syllable was not mentioned at the correct position, it was still scored as correct for its intended position (this was rare and had only a small effect on the data). Fig 6 shows clear serial position curves for all retention intervals.


Replication and Analysis of Ebbinghaus' Forgetting Curve.

Murre JM, Dros J - PLoS ONE (2015)

Serial position for correct relearning scores for each retention interval and for the average of all retention intervals (see text for an explanation).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4492928&req=5

pone.0120644.g006: Serial position for correct relearning scores for each retention interval and for the average of all retention intervals (see text for an explanation).
Mentions: In Fig 6, we have plotted the average serial position curves for each retention interval and for the grand average. Even if a correct syllable was not mentioned at the correct position, it was still scored as correct for its intended position (this was rare and had only a small effect on the data). Fig 6 shows clear serial position curves for all retention intervals.

Bottom Line: One subject spent 70 hours learning lists and relearning them after 20 min, 1 hour, 9 hours, 1 day, 2 days, or 31 days.The results are similar to Ebbinghaus' original data.We conclude that the Ebbinghaus forgetting curve has indeed been replicated and that it is not completely smooth but most probably shows a jump upwards starting at the 24 hour data point.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
We present a successful replication of Ebbinghaus' classic forgetting curve from 1880 based on the method of savings. One subject spent 70 hours learning lists and relearning them after 20 min, 1 hour, 9 hours, 1 day, 2 days, or 31 days. The results are similar to Ebbinghaus' original data. We analyze the effects of serial position on forgetting and investigate what mathematical equations present a good fit to the Ebbinghaus forgetting curve and its replications. We conclude that the Ebbinghaus forgetting curve has indeed been replicated and that it is not completely smooth but most probably shows a jump upwards starting at the 24 hour data point.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus