Limits...
Role of Procalcitonin and Interleukin-6 in Predicting Cancer, and Its Progression Independent of Infection.

Chaftari AM, Hachem R, Reitzel R, Jordan M, Jiang Y, Yousif A, Garoge K, Deshmukh P, Al Hamal Z, Jabbour J, Hanania A, Raad S, Jamal M, Raad I - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Levels of PCT and IL-6 were determined by Kryptor compact bioanalyzer.Median IL-6 level was significantly lower in the control group (0 pg/ml) than in non-febrile cancer patients with stages I-III (7.376 pg/ml) or stage IV (9.635 pg/ml) (p<0.0001).Our results suggest a potential role for PCT and IL-6 in predicting cancer in non-febrile patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Infectious Diseases, Infection Control and Employee Health/Division of Internal Medicine, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Procalcitonin (PCT) and Interleukin-6 (IL-6) have emerged as biomarkers for different inflammatory conditions. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the role of PCT and IL-6 as biomarkers of cancer and its progression in a large cohort of patients. This cross-sectional study included residual plasma samples collected from cancer patients, and control subjects without cancer. Levels of PCT and IL-6 were determined by Kryptor compact bioanalyzer. We identified 575 febrile cancer patients, 410 non-febrile cancer patients, and 79 non-cancer individuals. The median PCT level was lower in control subjects (0.029 ng/ml) compared to cancer patients with stage I-III disease (0.127 ng/ml) (p<0.0001) and stage IV disease (0.190 ng/ml) (p<0.0001). It was also higher in febrile cancer patients (0.310 ng/ml) compared to non-febrile cancer patients (0.1 ng/ml) (p<0.0001). Median IL-6 level was significantly lower in the control group (0 pg/ml) than in non-febrile cancer patients with stages I-III (7.376 pg/ml) or stage IV (9.635 pg/ml) (p<0.0001). Our results suggest a potential role for PCT and IL-6 in predicting cancer in non-febrile patients. In addition, PCT is useful in detecting progression of cancer and predicting bacteremia or sepsis in febrile cancer patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

ROC curve of PCT test to differentiate febrile cancer patients with bacteremia or sepsis versus non-febrile cancer patients.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4492776&req=5

pone.0130999.g003: ROC curve of PCT test to differentiate febrile cancer patients with bacteremia or sepsis versus non-febrile cancer patients.

Mentions: The median PCT level was higher in febrile cancer patients (0.310 ng/ml [range 0.02–154.7]) compared to non-febrile cancer patients (0.1 ng/ml [range 0–30.43]) as well as to the control group of non-cancer patients (0.029 ng/ml [range 0–0.203]) (p<0.0001). We further compared PCT level among different groups of patients (Fig 2). Specifically, non-cancer patients had a significantly lower PCT level (median: 0.029 ng/ml) than non-febrile cancer patients (median: 0.099 ng/ml) (p<0.0001) and the latter had a significantly lower PCT level than febrile cancer patients without microbiological infection (median: 0.310 ng/ml) (p<0.0001). Among the febrile cancer patients, those without microbiological infection had a significantly lower PCT level than those who had sepsis or bacteremia (median: 0.490 ng/ml) (p = 0.003) (Fig 2). An ROC analysis was performed for the PCT test to differentiate febrile cancer patients with bacteremia or sepsis versus non-febrile cancer patients. The area under the ROC curve was 0.80 with a 95% confidence interval of 0.76 to 0.83 (Fig 3). The optimal cut-off point was 0.17 ng/ml, with a sensitivity of 81%, a specificity of 69%, a positive predictive value of 54%, and a negative predictive value of 89%.


Role of Procalcitonin and Interleukin-6 in Predicting Cancer, and Its Progression Independent of Infection.

Chaftari AM, Hachem R, Reitzel R, Jordan M, Jiang Y, Yousif A, Garoge K, Deshmukh P, Al Hamal Z, Jabbour J, Hanania A, Raad S, Jamal M, Raad I - PLoS ONE (2015)

ROC curve of PCT test to differentiate febrile cancer patients with bacteremia or sepsis versus non-febrile cancer patients.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4492776&req=5

pone.0130999.g003: ROC curve of PCT test to differentiate febrile cancer patients with bacteremia or sepsis versus non-febrile cancer patients.
Mentions: The median PCT level was higher in febrile cancer patients (0.310 ng/ml [range 0.02–154.7]) compared to non-febrile cancer patients (0.1 ng/ml [range 0–30.43]) as well as to the control group of non-cancer patients (0.029 ng/ml [range 0–0.203]) (p<0.0001). We further compared PCT level among different groups of patients (Fig 2). Specifically, non-cancer patients had a significantly lower PCT level (median: 0.029 ng/ml) than non-febrile cancer patients (median: 0.099 ng/ml) (p<0.0001) and the latter had a significantly lower PCT level than febrile cancer patients without microbiological infection (median: 0.310 ng/ml) (p<0.0001). Among the febrile cancer patients, those without microbiological infection had a significantly lower PCT level than those who had sepsis or bacteremia (median: 0.490 ng/ml) (p = 0.003) (Fig 2). An ROC analysis was performed for the PCT test to differentiate febrile cancer patients with bacteremia or sepsis versus non-febrile cancer patients. The area under the ROC curve was 0.80 with a 95% confidence interval of 0.76 to 0.83 (Fig 3). The optimal cut-off point was 0.17 ng/ml, with a sensitivity of 81%, a specificity of 69%, a positive predictive value of 54%, and a negative predictive value of 89%.

Bottom Line: Levels of PCT and IL-6 were determined by Kryptor compact bioanalyzer.Median IL-6 level was significantly lower in the control group (0 pg/ml) than in non-febrile cancer patients with stages I-III (7.376 pg/ml) or stage IV (9.635 pg/ml) (p<0.0001).Our results suggest a potential role for PCT and IL-6 in predicting cancer in non-febrile patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Infectious Diseases, Infection Control and Employee Health/Division of Internal Medicine, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Procalcitonin (PCT) and Interleukin-6 (IL-6) have emerged as biomarkers for different inflammatory conditions. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the role of PCT and IL-6 as biomarkers of cancer and its progression in a large cohort of patients. This cross-sectional study included residual plasma samples collected from cancer patients, and control subjects without cancer. Levels of PCT and IL-6 were determined by Kryptor compact bioanalyzer. We identified 575 febrile cancer patients, 410 non-febrile cancer patients, and 79 non-cancer individuals. The median PCT level was lower in control subjects (0.029 ng/ml) compared to cancer patients with stage I-III disease (0.127 ng/ml) (p<0.0001) and stage IV disease (0.190 ng/ml) (p<0.0001). It was also higher in febrile cancer patients (0.310 ng/ml) compared to non-febrile cancer patients (0.1 ng/ml) (p<0.0001). Median IL-6 level was significantly lower in the control group (0 pg/ml) than in non-febrile cancer patients with stages I-III (7.376 pg/ml) or stage IV (9.635 pg/ml) (p<0.0001). Our results suggest a potential role for PCT and IL-6 in predicting cancer in non-febrile patients. In addition, PCT is useful in detecting progression of cancer and predicting bacteremia or sepsis in febrile cancer patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus