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Impact of the Preoperative Controlling Nutritional Status (CONUT) Score on the Survival after Curative Surgery for Colorectal Cancer.

Iseki Y, Shibutani M, Maeda K, Nagahara H, Ohtani H, Sugano K, Ikeya T, Muguruma K, Tanaka H, Toyokawa T, Sakurai K, Hirakawa K - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: The five-year cancer-specific survival (CSS) rate was significantly higher at 92.7% in the low CONUT group, compared to a rate of 81.0% in the high CONUT group (p=0.0016).The five-year CSS was 71.2% in the low PNI group and 92.3% in the high PNI group, which showed a significant difference (p=0.0155).This study suggested that the CONUT score is a strong independent predictor of the survival among CRC patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgical Oncology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Background: Recently, the preoperative immune-nutritional status has been reported to correlate with the survival rate in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). However, there have been no reports on the relationship between the controlling nutritional status (CONUT) score and the clinical outcome after curative surgery for CRC. We herein evaluated the prognostic significance of the CONUT score in patients with CRC, and then compared the accuracy of the CONUT score and the prognostic nutritional index (PNI) as a predictor of survival.

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed a database of 204 patients who underwent curative surgery for Stage II/III CRC. Patients were divided into two groups according to the CONUT score and the PNI.

Results: The five-year cancer-specific survival (CSS) rate was significantly higher at 92.7% in the low CONUT group, compared to a rate of 81.0% in the high CONUT group (p=0.0016). The five-year CSS was 71.2% in the low PNI group and 92.3% in the high PNI group, which showed a significant difference (p=0.0155). A multivariate analysis showed that lymph node metastasis and the CONUT score were independent risk factors for CSS.

Conclusion: This study suggested that the CONUT score is a strong independent predictor of the survival among CRC patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The Kaplan-Mayer survival curves for the cancer-specific survival (CSS).A) The survival curves according to the controlling nutritional status (CONUT) score. The cancer-specific survival rates were significantly worse in the high CONUT group compared to the low CONUT group (p = 0.0016). B) The survival curves according to the prognostic nutritional index (PNI). The cancer-specific survival rates were significantly worse in the low PNI group compared to the high PNI group (p = 0.0155).
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pone.0132488.g003: The Kaplan-Mayer survival curves for the cancer-specific survival (CSS).A) The survival curves according to the controlling nutritional status (CONUT) score. The cancer-specific survival rates were significantly worse in the high CONUT group compared to the low CONUT group (p = 0.0016). B) The survival curves according to the prognostic nutritional index (PNI). The cancer-specific survival rates were significantly worse in the low PNI group compared to the high PNI group (p = 0.0155).

Mentions: The five-year cancer-specific survival (CSS) was 92.7% in the low CONUT group and 81.0% in the high CONUT group (Fig 3), and there was a significant difference between the low and high CONUT groups (p = 0.0016). Moreover, the five-year CSS was significantly lower at 71.2% in the low PNI group compared to 92.7% in the high PNI group (Fig 3, p = 0.0155).


Impact of the Preoperative Controlling Nutritional Status (CONUT) Score on the Survival after Curative Surgery for Colorectal Cancer.

Iseki Y, Shibutani M, Maeda K, Nagahara H, Ohtani H, Sugano K, Ikeya T, Muguruma K, Tanaka H, Toyokawa T, Sakurai K, Hirakawa K - PLoS ONE (2015)

The Kaplan-Mayer survival curves for the cancer-specific survival (CSS).A) The survival curves according to the controlling nutritional status (CONUT) score. The cancer-specific survival rates were significantly worse in the high CONUT group compared to the low CONUT group (p = 0.0016). B) The survival curves according to the prognostic nutritional index (PNI). The cancer-specific survival rates were significantly worse in the low PNI group compared to the high PNI group (p = 0.0155).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4492767&req=5

pone.0132488.g003: The Kaplan-Mayer survival curves for the cancer-specific survival (CSS).A) The survival curves according to the controlling nutritional status (CONUT) score. The cancer-specific survival rates were significantly worse in the high CONUT group compared to the low CONUT group (p = 0.0016). B) The survival curves according to the prognostic nutritional index (PNI). The cancer-specific survival rates were significantly worse in the low PNI group compared to the high PNI group (p = 0.0155).
Mentions: The five-year cancer-specific survival (CSS) was 92.7% in the low CONUT group and 81.0% in the high CONUT group (Fig 3), and there was a significant difference between the low and high CONUT groups (p = 0.0016). Moreover, the five-year CSS was significantly lower at 71.2% in the low PNI group compared to 92.7% in the high PNI group (Fig 3, p = 0.0155).

Bottom Line: The five-year cancer-specific survival (CSS) rate was significantly higher at 92.7% in the low CONUT group, compared to a rate of 81.0% in the high CONUT group (p=0.0016).The five-year CSS was 71.2% in the low PNI group and 92.3% in the high PNI group, which showed a significant difference (p=0.0155).This study suggested that the CONUT score is a strong independent predictor of the survival among CRC patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgical Oncology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Background: Recently, the preoperative immune-nutritional status has been reported to correlate with the survival rate in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). However, there have been no reports on the relationship between the controlling nutritional status (CONUT) score and the clinical outcome after curative surgery for CRC. We herein evaluated the prognostic significance of the CONUT score in patients with CRC, and then compared the accuracy of the CONUT score and the prognostic nutritional index (PNI) as a predictor of survival.

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed a database of 204 patients who underwent curative surgery for Stage II/III CRC. Patients were divided into two groups according to the CONUT score and the PNI.

Results: The five-year cancer-specific survival (CSS) rate was significantly higher at 92.7% in the low CONUT group, compared to a rate of 81.0% in the high CONUT group (p=0.0016). The five-year CSS was 71.2% in the low PNI group and 92.3% in the high PNI group, which showed a significant difference (p=0.0155). A multivariate analysis showed that lymph node metastasis and the CONUT score were independent risk factors for CSS.

Conclusion: This study suggested that the CONUT score is a strong independent predictor of the survival among CRC patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus