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Scientometrics of drug discovery efforts: pain-related molecular targets.

Kissin I - Drug Des Devel Ther (2015)

Bottom Line: However, even with these seven topics, the index of expectations decreased or did not change compared with the 2004-2008 period.This approach has not yet demonstrated clinical effectiveness (at least with nerve growth factor) much beyond conventional analgesics, when its potential cost is more than an order of magnitude higher than that of conventional treatments.This scientometric assessment demonstrated a lack of real breakthrough developments.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

ABSTRACT
The aim of this study was to make a scientometric assessment of drug discovery efforts centered on pain-related molecular targets. The following scientometric indices were used: the popularity index, representing the share of articles (or patents) on a specific topic among all articles (or patents) on pain over the same 5-year period; the index of change, representing the change in the number of articles (or patents) on a topic from one 5-year period to the next; the index of expectations, representing the ratio of the number of all types of articles on a topic in the top 20 journals relative to the number of articles in all (>5,000) biomedical journals covered by PubMed over a 5-year period; the total number of articles representing Phase I-III trials of investigational drugs over a 5-year period; and the trial balance index, a ratio of Phase I-II publications to Phase III publications. Articles (PubMed database) and patents (US Patent and Trademark Office database) on 17 topics related to pain mechanisms were assessed during six 5-year periods from 1984 to 2013. During the most recent 5-year period (2009-2013), seven of 17 topics have demonstrated high research activity (purinergic receptors, serotonin, transient receptor potential channels, cytokines, gamma aminobutyric acid, glutamate, and protein kinases). However, even with these seven topics, the index of expectations decreased or did not change compared with the 2004-2008 period. In addition, publications representing Phase I-III trials of investigational drugs (2009-2013) did not indicate great enthusiasm on the part of the pharmaceutical industry regarding drugs specifically designed for treatment of pain. A promising development related to the new tool of molecular targeting, ie, monoclonal antibodies, for pain treatment has not yet resulted in real success. This approach has not yet demonstrated clinical effectiveness (at least with nerve growth factor) much beyond conventional analgesics, when its potential cost is more than an order of magnitude higher than that of conventional treatments. This scientometric assessment demonstrated a lack of real breakthrough developments.

No MeSH data available.


Time courses of popularity indices related to patents and articles for TRP channels (A) and serotonin (B).Notes: The article-related popularity index is the percentage of articles on a topic among all articles on pain published over the same 5-year period. Similarly, the patent-related popularity index is the percentage of patents on a topic among all US patents pertinent to pain. The figure indicates that changes in the patent-related popularity index on these two topics occur faster than for the article-related popularity index.Abbreviation: TRP, transient receptor potential.
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f1-dddt-9-3393: Time courses of popularity indices related to patents and articles for TRP channels (A) and serotonin (B).Notes: The article-related popularity index is the percentage of articles on a topic among all articles on pain published over the same 5-year period. Similarly, the patent-related popularity index is the percentage of patents on a topic among all US patents pertinent to pain. The figure indicates that changes in the patent-related popularity index on these two topics occur faster than for the article-related popularity index.Abbreviation: TRP, transient receptor potential.

Mentions: The patent-related IP is presented in Table 8. Four of 17 topics at one of the six 5-year periods had an IP ≥2.0: serotonin, 3.6 (1994–1998), glutamate, 3.4 (1999–2003), CGRP, 3.3 (2004–2008), and calcium channels, 2.0 (2004–2008). IP values for all of these four topics went down in 2009–2013. As indicated in Table 2, which presents scientometric data on 17 molecular topics in general, the number of pain-related patents is approximately two orders of magnitude lower than that for pain-related article publications. This relationship is mirrored by the total number of articles and total number of patents. For example, the total number of pain-related articles covered by PubMed in 2009–2013 was 144,048 and the total number of pain-related patents covered by the US Patent and Trademark Office was 1,149. When the number of patents on a specific topic is presented as the percentage of patents among all other patents on pain obtained over the same 5-year period (patent-related IP), the values of the patent-related IP and the article-related IP are much closer to each other than the total number of patents and articles. For example, in 2009–2013, the serotonin patent-related IP was 0.9 and the article-related IP was 1.0; with TRP channels, the patent-related IP was 1.2 and the article-related IP was also 1.2; and with glutamate the patent-related IP was 1.6 and the article-related IP was 1.0. An additional observation derived from comparisons of changes in patents and articles is that changes in the patent-related IP on some topics can occur faster than for the article-related IP on the same topic. Several such cases are presented in Figure 1A and B.


Scientometrics of drug discovery efforts: pain-related molecular targets.

Kissin I - Drug Des Devel Ther (2015)

Time courses of popularity indices related to patents and articles for TRP channels (A) and serotonin (B).Notes: The article-related popularity index is the percentage of articles on a topic among all articles on pain published over the same 5-year period. Similarly, the patent-related popularity index is the percentage of patents on a topic among all US patents pertinent to pain. The figure indicates that changes in the patent-related popularity index on these two topics occur faster than for the article-related popularity index.Abbreviation: TRP, transient receptor potential.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4492640&req=5

f1-dddt-9-3393: Time courses of popularity indices related to patents and articles for TRP channels (A) and serotonin (B).Notes: The article-related popularity index is the percentage of articles on a topic among all articles on pain published over the same 5-year period. Similarly, the patent-related popularity index is the percentage of patents on a topic among all US patents pertinent to pain. The figure indicates that changes in the patent-related popularity index on these two topics occur faster than for the article-related popularity index.Abbreviation: TRP, transient receptor potential.
Mentions: The patent-related IP is presented in Table 8. Four of 17 topics at one of the six 5-year periods had an IP ≥2.0: serotonin, 3.6 (1994–1998), glutamate, 3.4 (1999–2003), CGRP, 3.3 (2004–2008), and calcium channels, 2.0 (2004–2008). IP values for all of these four topics went down in 2009–2013. As indicated in Table 2, which presents scientometric data on 17 molecular topics in general, the number of pain-related patents is approximately two orders of magnitude lower than that for pain-related article publications. This relationship is mirrored by the total number of articles and total number of patents. For example, the total number of pain-related articles covered by PubMed in 2009–2013 was 144,048 and the total number of pain-related patents covered by the US Patent and Trademark Office was 1,149. When the number of patents on a specific topic is presented as the percentage of patents among all other patents on pain obtained over the same 5-year period (patent-related IP), the values of the patent-related IP and the article-related IP are much closer to each other than the total number of patents and articles. For example, in 2009–2013, the serotonin patent-related IP was 0.9 and the article-related IP was 1.0; with TRP channels, the patent-related IP was 1.2 and the article-related IP was also 1.2; and with glutamate the patent-related IP was 1.6 and the article-related IP was 1.0. An additional observation derived from comparisons of changes in patents and articles is that changes in the patent-related IP on some topics can occur faster than for the article-related IP on the same topic. Several such cases are presented in Figure 1A and B.

Bottom Line: However, even with these seven topics, the index of expectations decreased or did not change compared with the 2004-2008 period.This approach has not yet demonstrated clinical effectiveness (at least with nerve growth factor) much beyond conventional analgesics, when its potential cost is more than an order of magnitude higher than that of conventional treatments.This scientometric assessment demonstrated a lack of real breakthrough developments.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

ABSTRACT
The aim of this study was to make a scientometric assessment of drug discovery efforts centered on pain-related molecular targets. The following scientometric indices were used: the popularity index, representing the share of articles (or patents) on a specific topic among all articles (or patents) on pain over the same 5-year period; the index of change, representing the change in the number of articles (or patents) on a topic from one 5-year period to the next; the index of expectations, representing the ratio of the number of all types of articles on a topic in the top 20 journals relative to the number of articles in all (>5,000) biomedical journals covered by PubMed over a 5-year period; the total number of articles representing Phase I-III trials of investigational drugs over a 5-year period; and the trial balance index, a ratio of Phase I-II publications to Phase III publications. Articles (PubMed database) and patents (US Patent and Trademark Office database) on 17 topics related to pain mechanisms were assessed during six 5-year periods from 1984 to 2013. During the most recent 5-year period (2009-2013), seven of 17 topics have demonstrated high research activity (purinergic receptors, serotonin, transient receptor potential channels, cytokines, gamma aminobutyric acid, glutamate, and protein kinases). However, even with these seven topics, the index of expectations decreased or did not change compared with the 2004-2008 period. In addition, publications representing Phase I-III trials of investigational drugs (2009-2013) did not indicate great enthusiasm on the part of the pharmaceutical industry regarding drugs specifically designed for treatment of pain. A promising development related to the new tool of molecular targeting, ie, monoclonal antibodies, for pain treatment has not yet resulted in real success. This approach has not yet demonstrated clinical effectiveness (at least with nerve growth factor) much beyond conventional analgesics, when its potential cost is more than an order of magnitude higher than that of conventional treatments. This scientometric assessment demonstrated a lack of real breakthrough developments.

No MeSH data available.