Limits...
Mating Reverses Actuarial Aging in Female Queensland Fruit Flies.

Yap S, Fanson BG, Taylor PW - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: In a remarkable exception, one tephritid fruit fly exhibits substantial pre-reproductive aging but then mitigates this aging during a diet-dependent transition to the reproductive stage, after which life expectancy matches that of newly emerged flies.Here, we ascertain the role of nutrients, sexual maturation and mating in mitigation of previous aging in female Queensland fruit flies.Identifying the physiological processes associated with mating promise novel insights into repair mechanisms for aging.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Animals that have a long pre-reproductive adult stage often employ mechanisms that minimize aging over this period in order to preserve reproductive lifespan. In a remarkable exception, one tephritid fruit fly exhibits substantial pre-reproductive aging but then mitigates this aging during a diet-dependent transition to the reproductive stage, after which life expectancy matches that of newly emerged flies. Here, we ascertain the role of nutrients, sexual maturation and mating in mitigation of previous aging in female Queensland fruit flies. Flies were provided one of three diets: 'sugar', 'essential', or 'yeast-sugar'. Essential diet contained sugar and micronutrients found in yeast but lacked maturation-enabling protein. At days 20 and 30, a subset of flies on the sugar diet were switched to essential or yeast-sugar diet, and some yeast-sugar fed flies were mated 10 days later. Complete mitigation of actuarial aging was only observed in flies that were switched to a yeast-sugar diet and mated, indicating that mating is key. Identifying the physiological processes associated with mating promise novel insights into repair mechanisms for aging.

No MeSH data available.


Smoothed mortality trajectories of Q-flies for each treatment.The left column (a, b and c) shows the mortality trajectories after Q-flies were switched from SUG to ESS or YS diet, respectively, in relation to time since emergence (Day 0 in red; Day 20 in green, Day 30 in blue). The mortality trajectory for flies maintained on SUG throughout is included in all figures (black, dashed line). The right column (d, e and f) shows the same mortality trajectories that are adjusted for the time from the diet switch (or mating for mated groups): For flies switched to the ESS or YS diet at 20 and 30 days old the x-axis has been re-scaled so that 0 represents the start of observations on the new diet. For YS-mated flies, the x-axis has been re-scaled so that 0 represents the start of observation from mating. Mortality rates were calculated until five individuals remained in each group.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4492602&req=5

pone.0132486.g001: Smoothed mortality trajectories of Q-flies for each treatment.The left column (a, b and c) shows the mortality trajectories after Q-flies were switched from SUG to ESS or YS diet, respectively, in relation to time since emergence (Day 0 in red; Day 20 in green, Day 30 in blue). The mortality trajectory for flies maintained on SUG throughout is included in all figures (black, dashed line). The right column (d, e and f) shows the same mortality trajectories that are adjusted for the time from the diet switch (or mating for mated groups): For flies switched to the ESS or YS diet at 20 and 30 days old the x-axis has been re-scaled so that 0 represents the start of observations on the new diet. For YS-mated flies, the x-axis has been re-scaled so that 0 represents the start of observation from mating. Mortality rates were calculated until five individuals remained in each group.

Mentions: Micronutrients in the ESS diet substantially increased longevity of female Q-flies with ESS-0 flies living over twice as long as SUG-0 flies (Table 1; 42.6 vs. 17.0 days, t1323 = 28.46, p < 0.001). This is also reflected in the shape of their mortality schedules (Fig 1A; χ2 = 124.41, p < 0.001); ESS-0 showed a gradual increase in mortality rate with age whereas SUG-0 flies showed a rapidly increasing mortality rate for the first 20 days and then remained fairly steady for the next 30 days (Fig 1A).


Mating Reverses Actuarial Aging in Female Queensland Fruit Flies.

Yap S, Fanson BG, Taylor PW - PLoS ONE (2015)

Smoothed mortality trajectories of Q-flies for each treatment.The left column (a, b and c) shows the mortality trajectories after Q-flies were switched from SUG to ESS or YS diet, respectively, in relation to time since emergence (Day 0 in red; Day 20 in green, Day 30 in blue). The mortality trajectory for flies maintained on SUG throughout is included in all figures (black, dashed line). The right column (d, e and f) shows the same mortality trajectories that are adjusted for the time from the diet switch (or mating for mated groups): For flies switched to the ESS or YS diet at 20 and 30 days old the x-axis has been re-scaled so that 0 represents the start of observations on the new diet. For YS-mated flies, the x-axis has been re-scaled so that 0 represents the start of observation from mating. Mortality rates were calculated until five individuals remained in each group.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4492602&req=5

pone.0132486.g001: Smoothed mortality trajectories of Q-flies for each treatment.The left column (a, b and c) shows the mortality trajectories after Q-flies were switched from SUG to ESS or YS diet, respectively, in relation to time since emergence (Day 0 in red; Day 20 in green, Day 30 in blue). The mortality trajectory for flies maintained on SUG throughout is included in all figures (black, dashed line). The right column (d, e and f) shows the same mortality trajectories that are adjusted for the time from the diet switch (or mating for mated groups): For flies switched to the ESS or YS diet at 20 and 30 days old the x-axis has been re-scaled so that 0 represents the start of observations on the new diet. For YS-mated flies, the x-axis has been re-scaled so that 0 represents the start of observation from mating. Mortality rates were calculated until five individuals remained in each group.
Mentions: Micronutrients in the ESS diet substantially increased longevity of female Q-flies with ESS-0 flies living over twice as long as SUG-0 flies (Table 1; 42.6 vs. 17.0 days, t1323 = 28.46, p < 0.001). This is also reflected in the shape of their mortality schedules (Fig 1A; χ2 = 124.41, p < 0.001); ESS-0 showed a gradual increase in mortality rate with age whereas SUG-0 flies showed a rapidly increasing mortality rate for the first 20 days and then remained fairly steady for the next 30 days (Fig 1A).

Bottom Line: In a remarkable exception, one tephritid fruit fly exhibits substantial pre-reproductive aging but then mitigates this aging during a diet-dependent transition to the reproductive stage, after which life expectancy matches that of newly emerged flies.Here, we ascertain the role of nutrients, sexual maturation and mating in mitigation of previous aging in female Queensland fruit flies.Identifying the physiological processes associated with mating promise novel insights into repair mechanisms for aging.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Animals that have a long pre-reproductive adult stage often employ mechanisms that minimize aging over this period in order to preserve reproductive lifespan. In a remarkable exception, one tephritid fruit fly exhibits substantial pre-reproductive aging but then mitigates this aging during a diet-dependent transition to the reproductive stage, after which life expectancy matches that of newly emerged flies. Here, we ascertain the role of nutrients, sexual maturation and mating in mitigation of previous aging in female Queensland fruit flies. Flies were provided one of three diets: 'sugar', 'essential', or 'yeast-sugar'. Essential diet contained sugar and micronutrients found in yeast but lacked maturation-enabling protein. At days 20 and 30, a subset of flies on the sugar diet were switched to essential or yeast-sugar diet, and some yeast-sugar fed flies were mated 10 days later. Complete mitigation of actuarial aging was only observed in flies that were switched to a yeast-sugar diet and mated, indicating that mating is key. Identifying the physiological processes associated with mating promise novel insights into repair mechanisms for aging.

No MeSH data available.