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Experimental and Theoretical Investigation of Crystallographic Orientation Dependence of Nanoscratching of Single Crystalline Copper.

Geng Y, Zhang J, Yan Y, Yu B, Geng L, Sun T - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: The correlation of microscopic deformation behavior of the material with macroscopically-observed machining results is revealed.Moreover, the influence of crystallographic orientation on the nanoscratching of single crystalline copper is examined.Both experiments and MD simulations demonstrate that the machined surface morphologies in terms of groove depth and surface pile-up exhibit strong crystallographic orientation dependence, because of different geometries of activated slip planes cutting with free surfaces and strain hardening abilities associated with different crystallographic orientations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The State Key Laboratory of Robotics and Systems, Robotics Institute, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang, 150008, P. R. China; Center for Precision Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang, 150001, P. R. China.

ABSTRACT
In the present work, we perform experiments and molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate the underlying deformation mechanisms of single crystalline copper under the load-controlled multi-passes nanoscratching using a triangular pyramidal probe. The correlation of microscopic deformation behavior of the material with macroscopically-observed machining results is revealed. Moreover, the influence of crystallographic orientation on the nanoscratching of single crystalline copper is examined. Our simulation results indicate that the plastic deformation of single crystalline Cu under the nanoscratching is exclusively governed by dislocation mechanisms. However, there is no glissile dislocation structure formed due to the probe oscillation under the load-controlled mode. Both experiments and MD simulations demonstrate that the machined surface morphologies in terms of groove depth and surface pile-up exhibit strong crystallographic orientation dependence, because of different geometries of activated slip planes cutting with free surfaces and strain hardening abilities associated with different crystallographic orientations.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

MD snapshots of load-controlled multi-passes nanoscratching of single crystalline Cu(010).Top and bottom rows show machined surface morphologies and instantaneous defect structures after (a) and (d) 1st, (b) and (e) 2nd, and (c) and (f) 3rd scratching pass. Atoms in the top and bottom rows are colored according to their atomic heights and CNA values, respectively.
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pone.0131886.g003: MD snapshots of load-controlled multi-passes nanoscratching of single crystalline Cu(010).Top and bottom rows show machined surface morphologies and instantaneous defect structures after (a) and (d) 1st, (b) and (e) 2nd, and (c) and (f) 3rd scratching pass. Atoms in the top and bottom rows are colored according to their atomic heights and CNA values, respectively.

Mentions: As a supplement to the experiments, MD simulations of multi-passes nanoscratching of single crystalline Cu(010) along [100] direction is also performed. The top row in Fig 3 presents machined surface morphologies of the Cu sample after different scratching passes. The scratching direction is indicated by the arrow. It is seen from Fig 3(A)–3(C) that there is no chip formed and the surface pile-up mainly accumulates on the left side of the groove, which are consistent with the experimental observations. Particularly, it is also found that the displaced material in front of the probe adheres closely to one side of the triangular pyramid, indicating the material accumulation is strongly influenced by the probe geometry. The bottom row in Fig 3 presents instantaneous defect structures within the sample after different scratching passes. It is found from Fig 3(D)–3(F) that there are considerable dislocations generated in the material after each scratching pass. Furthermore, the dislocation density increases with scratching pass number.


Experimental and Theoretical Investigation of Crystallographic Orientation Dependence of Nanoscratching of Single Crystalline Copper.

Geng Y, Zhang J, Yan Y, Yu B, Geng L, Sun T - PLoS ONE (2015)

MD snapshots of load-controlled multi-passes nanoscratching of single crystalline Cu(010).Top and bottom rows show machined surface morphologies and instantaneous defect structures after (a) and (d) 1st, (b) and (e) 2nd, and (c) and (f) 3rd scratching pass. Atoms in the top and bottom rows are colored according to their atomic heights and CNA values, respectively.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4492598&req=5

pone.0131886.g003: MD snapshots of load-controlled multi-passes nanoscratching of single crystalline Cu(010).Top and bottom rows show machined surface morphologies and instantaneous defect structures after (a) and (d) 1st, (b) and (e) 2nd, and (c) and (f) 3rd scratching pass. Atoms in the top and bottom rows are colored according to their atomic heights and CNA values, respectively.
Mentions: As a supplement to the experiments, MD simulations of multi-passes nanoscratching of single crystalline Cu(010) along [100] direction is also performed. The top row in Fig 3 presents machined surface morphologies of the Cu sample after different scratching passes. The scratching direction is indicated by the arrow. It is seen from Fig 3(A)–3(C) that there is no chip formed and the surface pile-up mainly accumulates on the left side of the groove, which are consistent with the experimental observations. Particularly, it is also found that the displaced material in front of the probe adheres closely to one side of the triangular pyramid, indicating the material accumulation is strongly influenced by the probe geometry. The bottom row in Fig 3 presents instantaneous defect structures within the sample after different scratching passes. It is found from Fig 3(D)–3(F) that there are considerable dislocations generated in the material after each scratching pass. Furthermore, the dislocation density increases with scratching pass number.

Bottom Line: The correlation of microscopic deformation behavior of the material with macroscopically-observed machining results is revealed.Moreover, the influence of crystallographic orientation on the nanoscratching of single crystalline copper is examined.Both experiments and MD simulations demonstrate that the machined surface morphologies in terms of groove depth and surface pile-up exhibit strong crystallographic orientation dependence, because of different geometries of activated slip planes cutting with free surfaces and strain hardening abilities associated with different crystallographic orientations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The State Key Laboratory of Robotics and Systems, Robotics Institute, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang, 150008, P. R. China; Center for Precision Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang, 150001, P. R. China.

ABSTRACT
In the present work, we perform experiments and molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate the underlying deformation mechanisms of single crystalline copper under the load-controlled multi-passes nanoscratching using a triangular pyramidal probe. The correlation of microscopic deformation behavior of the material with macroscopically-observed machining results is revealed. Moreover, the influence of crystallographic orientation on the nanoscratching of single crystalline copper is examined. Our simulation results indicate that the plastic deformation of single crystalline Cu under the nanoscratching is exclusively governed by dislocation mechanisms. However, there is no glissile dislocation structure formed due to the probe oscillation under the load-controlled mode. Both experiments and MD simulations demonstrate that the machined surface morphologies in terms of groove depth and surface pile-up exhibit strong crystallographic orientation dependence, because of different geometries of activated slip planes cutting with free surfaces and strain hardening abilities associated with different crystallographic orientations.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus