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Basic Emotions in the Nencki Affective Word List (NAWL BE): New Method of Classifying Emotional Stimuli.

Wierzba M, Riegel M, Wypych M, Jednoróg K, Turnau P, Grabowska A, Marchewka A - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: The general characteristics of the present word database, as well as the relationships between the studied variables are shown to be consistent with typical patterns found in previous studies using similar databases for different languages.To make the NAWL more convenient to use, we introduce a comprehensive method of classifying stimuli to basic emotion categories.We discuss the advantages of our method in comparison to other methods of classification.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Brain Imaging, Neurobiology Centre, Nencki Institute of Experimental Biology, Warsaw, Poland.

ABSTRACT
The Nencki Affective Word List (NAWL) has recently been introduced as a standardized database of Polish words suitable for studying various aspects of language and emotions. Though the NAWL was originally based on the most commonly used dimensional approach, it is not the only way of studying emotions. Another framework is based on discrete emotional categories. Since the two perspectives are recognized as complementary, the aim of the present study was to supplement the NAWL database by the addition of categories corresponding to basic emotions. Thus, 2902 Polish words from the NAWL were presented to 265 subjects, who were instructed to rate them according to the intensity of each of the five basic emotions: happiness, anger, sadness, fear and disgust. The general characteristics of the present word database, as well as the relationships between the studied variables are shown to be consistent with typical patterns found in previous studies using similar databases for different languages. Here we present the Basic Emotions in the Nencki Affective Word List (NAWL BE) as a database of verbal material suitable for highly controlled experimental research. To make the NAWL more convenient to use, we introduce a comprehensive method of classifying stimuli to basic emotion categories. We discuss the advantages of our method in comparison to other methods of classification. Additionally, we provide an interactive online tool (http://exp.lobi.nencki.gov.pl/nawl-analysis) to help researchers browse and interactively generate classes of stimuli to meet their specific requirements.

No MeSH data available.


Normalized frequency distribution of mean ratings for the basic emotions included in the NAWL (n = 2902).Dotted lines represent median values of the respective distributions.
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pone.0132305.g001: Normalized frequency distribution of mean ratings for the basic emotions included in the NAWL (n = 2902).Dotted lines represent median values of the respective distributions.

Mentions: To analyse the distribution of mean ratings for each basic emotion over the set of 2902 words, we divided the full range (1–7) into 18 equal bins. For each bin, the number of means falling within the bin range was calculated for each basic emotion separately. Frequencies obtained in this way (normalized by dividing them by the number of words in the database) were plotted (Fig 1) following [35]. Dotted lines indicate median values (Mdn) in each emotion category. The plot makes it immediately clear that lower ratings were much more frequent, irrespective of emotion category. In particular, the frequencies of words rated below 2 were: 32% for happiness, 57% for anger, 59% for sadness, 42% for fear and 65% for disgust. The plot also shows that happiness ratings are much more dispersed, covering more uniformly the whole range, indicating that it is relatively easier to find words eliciting higher values of happiness than of other basic emotions.


Basic Emotions in the Nencki Affective Word List (NAWL BE): New Method of Classifying Emotional Stimuli.

Wierzba M, Riegel M, Wypych M, Jednoróg K, Turnau P, Grabowska A, Marchewka A - PLoS ONE (2015)

Normalized frequency distribution of mean ratings for the basic emotions included in the NAWL (n = 2902).Dotted lines represent median values of the respective distributions.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4492597&req=5

pone.0132305.g001: Normalized frequency distribution of mean ratings for the basic emotions included in the NAWL (n = 2902).Dotted lines represent median values of the respective distributions.
Mentions: To analyse the distribution of mean ratings for each basic emotion over the set of 2902 words, we divided the full range (1–7) into 18 equal bins. For each bin, the number of means falling within the bin range was calculated for each basic emotion separately. Frequencies obtained in this way (normalized by dividing them by the number of words in the database) were plotted (Fig 1) following [35]. Dotted lines indicate median values (Mdn) in each emotion category. The plot makes it immediately clear that lower ratings were much more frequent, irrespective of emotion category. In particular, the frequencies of words rated below 2 were: 32% for happiness, 57% for anger, 59% for sadness, 42% for fear and 65% for disgust. The plot also shows that happiness ratings are much more dispersed, covering more uniformly the whole range, indicating that it is relatively easier to find words eliciting higher values of happiness than of other basic emotions.

Bottom Line: The general characteristics of the present word database, as well as the relationships between the studied variables are shown to be consistent with typical patterns found in previous studies using similar databases for different languages.To make the NAWL more convenient to use, we introduce a comprehensive method of classifying stimuli to basic emotion categories.We discuss the advantages of our method in comparison to other methods of classification.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Brain Imaging, Neurobiology Centre, Nencki Institute of Experimental Biology, Warsaw, Poland.

ABSTRACT
The Nencki Affective Word List (NAWL) has recently been introduced as a standardized database of Polish words suitable for studying various aspects of language and emotions. Though the NAWL was originally based on the most commonly used dimensional approach, it is not the only way of studying emotions. Another framework is based on discrete emotional categories. Since the two perspectives are recognized as complementary, the aim of the present study was to supplement the NAWL database by the addition of categories corresponding to basic emotions. Thus, 2902 Polish words from the NAWL were presented to 265 subjects, who were instructed to rate them according to the intensity of each of the five basic emotions: happiness, anger, sadness, fear and disgust. The general characteristics of the present word database, as well as the relationships between the studied variables are shown to be consistent with typical patterns found in previous studies using similar databases for different languages. Here we present the Basic Emotions in the Nencki Affective Word List (NAWL BE) as a database of verbal material suitable for highly controlled experimental research. To make the NAWL more convenient to use, we introduce a comprehensive method of classifying stimuli to basic emotion categories. We discuss the advantages of our method in comparison to other methods of classification. Additionally, we provide an interactive online tool (http://exp.lobi.nencki.gov.pl/nawl-analysis) to help researchers browse and interactively generate classes of stimuli to meet their specific requirements.

No MeSH data available.