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The importance of PET/CT in the evaluation of patients with Ewing tumors.

Guimarães JB, Rigo L, Lewin F, Emerick A - Radiol Bras (2015 May-Jun)

Bottom Line: The effective evaluation for the treatment of patients with Ewing tumors depends on the accuracy in the determination of the primary tumor extent and the presence of metastatic disease.Currently, the assessment of patients with Ewing tumor should comprise a study with PET/CT combined with other anatomical imaging modalities, such as radiography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: MD, Radiologist at Medimagem, Physician Assistant at Musculoskeletal Unit, Hospital São José - Beneficência Portuguesa de São Paulo, Collaborator and Fellow at Musculoskeletal Unit, Department of Imaging Diagnosis - Escola Paulista de Medicina da Universidade Federal de São Paulo (EPM-Unifesp), São Paulo, SP, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
The effective evaluation for the treatment of patients with Ewing tumors depends on the accuracy in the determination of the primary tumor extent and the presence of metastatic disease. Currently, no universally accepted staging system is available to assess Ewing tumors. The present study aimed at discussing the use of PET/CT as a tool for staging, restaging and assessment of therapeutic response in patients with Ewing tumors. In spite of some limitations of PET/CT as compared with anatomical imaging methods, its relevance in the assessment of these patients is related to the capacity of the method to provide further physiological information, which often generates important clinical implications. Currently, the assessment of patients with Ewing tumor should comprise a study with PET/CT combined with other anatomical imaging modalities, such as radiography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

PET/CT and TC images of the same patient as on Figure 2 showing an area of moderate radiopharmaceutical uptake in theperiphery of the VI hepatic segment, with increased radiopharmaceutical uptake atthe delayed phase, with no sign of the lesion at CT. The lesion was actually ametastasis diagnosed only by PET (sharp glycolytic activity) and not by CT(anatomical).
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f03: PET/CT and TC images of the same patient as on Figure 2 showing an area of moderate radiopharmaceutical uptake in theperiphery of the VI hepatic segment, with increased radiopharmaceutical uptake atthe delayed phase, with no sign of the lesion at CT. The lesion was actually ametastasis diagnosed only by PET (sharp glycolytic activity) and not by CT(anatomical).

Mentions: Figures 1, 2and 3 show PET/CT images of patients with Ewing'ssarcoma.


The importance of PET/CT in the evaluation of patients with Ewing tumors.

Guimarães JB, Rigo L, Lewin F, Emerick A - Radiol Bras (2015 May-Jun)

PET/CT and TC images of the same patient as on Figure 2 showing an area of moderate radiopharmaceutical uptake in theperiphery of the VI hepatic segment, with increased radiopharmaceutical uptake atthe delayed phase, with no sign of the lesion at CT. The lesion was actually ametastasis diagnosed only by PET (sharp glycolytic activity) and not by CT(anatomical).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4492570&req=5

f03: PET/CT and TC images of the same patient as on Figure 2 showing an area of moderate radiopharmaceutical uptake in theperiphery of the VI hepatic segment, with increased radiopharmaceutical uptake atthe delayed phase, with no sign of the lesion at CT. The lesion was actually ametastasis diagnosed only by PET (sharp glycolytic activity) and not by CT(anatomical).
Mentions: Figures 1, 2and 3 show PET/CT images of patients with Ewing'ssarcoma.

Bottom Line: The effective evaluation for the treatment of patients with Ewing tumors depends on the accuracy in the determination of the primary tumor extent and the presence of metastatic disease.Currently, the assessment of patients with Ewing tumor should comprise a study with PET/CT combined with other anatomical imaging modalities, such as radiography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: MD, Radiologist at Medimagem, Physician Assistant at Musculoskeletal Unit, Hospital São José - Beneficência Portuguesa de São Paulo, Collaborator and Fellow at Musculoskeletal Unit, Department of Imaging Diagnosis - Escola Paulista de Medicina da Universidade Federal de São Paulo (EPM-Unifesp), São Paulo, SP, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
The effective evaluation for the treatment of patients with Ewing tumors depends on the accuracy in the determination of the primary tumor extent and the presence of metastatic disease. Currently, no universally accepted staging system is available to assess Ewing tumors. The present study aimed at discussing the use of PET/CT as a tool for staging, restaging and assessment of therapeutic response in patients with Ewing tumors. In spite of some limitations of PET/CT as compared with anatomical imaging methods, its relevance in the assessment of these patients is related to the capacity of the method to provide further physiological information, which often generates important clinical implications. Currently, the assessment of patients with Ewing tumor should comprise a study with PET/CT combined with other anatomical imaging modalities, such as radiography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus