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Is there any association between Hashimoto's thyroiditis and thyroid cancer? A retrospective data analysis.

de Alcântara-Jones DM, de Alcântara-Nunes TF, Rocha Bde O, de Oliveira RD, Santana AC, de Alcântara FT, de Faria TM, da Silva IC, Araújo LM - Radiol Bras (2015 May-Jun)

Bottom Line: Typical cytopathological aspects and/or classical histopathological findings were taken into consideration in the diagnosis of HT, and only histopathological results were considered in the diagnosis of PTC.In spite of the absence of association between HT and PCT, the possibility of malignancy in HT should always be considered because of the coexistence of the two diseases already reported in the literature.Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Associate Professor III, Department of Pathology and Legal Medicine at Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Endocrinologist at Hospital São Rafael, Salvador, BA, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To evaluate the association between Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) and papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC).

Materials and methods: The patients were evaluated by ultrasonography-guided fine needle aspiration cytology. Typical cytopathological aspects and/or classical histopathological findings were taken into consideration in the diagnosis of HT, and only histopathological results were considered in the diagnosis of PTC.

Results: Among 1,049 patients with multi- or uninodular goiter (903 women and 146 men), 173 (16.5%) had cytopathological features of thyroiditis. Thirty-three (67.4%) out of the 49 operated patients had PTC, 9 (27.3%) of them with histopathological features of HT. Five (31.3%) out of the 16 patients with non-malignant disease also had HT. In the groups with HT, PTC, and PCT+HT, the female prevalence rate was 100%, 91.6%, and 77.8%, respectively. Mean age was 41.5, 43.3, and 48.5 years, respectively. No association was observed between the two diseases in the present study where HT occurred in 31.1% of the benign cases and in 27.3% of malignant cases (p = 0.8).

Conclusion: In spite of the absence of association between HT and PCT, the possibility of malignancy in HT should always be considered because of the coexistence of the two diseases already reported in the literature.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Circumscribed neoplastic papilliferous thyroid carcinoma. Presence of inflammatorycells, especially lymphocytes (lymphocytic thyroiditis).
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f02: Circumscribed neoplastic papilliferous thyroid carcinoma. Presence of inflammatorycells, especially lymphocytes (lymphocytic thyroiditis).

Mentions: Morphological, immunohistochemical and molecular characteristics are common to bothdiseases, a fact that reinforces such a supposition. The inflammatory process that isalways present in HT is common to other conditions considered as predisposing toneoplasms, a fact that has been attributed to the production of free radicals, and toaccumulation of oxidative DNA damage and possible facilitator of neoplasia development.Figure 2 shows the histopathological pattern ofPTC with lymphocytic infiltration, fibrosis and glandular atrophy, similar to whatoccurs at HT, a fact that is attributed by other authors to the attempt of the body tolimit the pathological process(18).


Is there any association between Hashimoto's thyroiditis and thyroid cancer? A retrospective data analysis.

de Alcântara-Jones DM, de Alcântara-Nunes TF, Rocha Bde O, de Oliveira RD, Santana AC, de Alcântara FT, de Faria TM, da Silva IC, Araújo LM - Radiol Bras (2015 May-Jun)

Circumscribed neoplastic papilliferous thyroid carcinoma. Presence of inflammatorycells, especially lymphocytes (lymphocytic thyroiditis).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4492566&req=5

f02: Circumscribed neoplastic papilliferous thyroid carcinoma. Presence of inflammatorycells, especially lymphocytes (lymphocytic thyroiditis).
Mentions: Morphological, immunohistochemical and molecular characteristics are common to bothdiseases, a fact that reinforces such a supposition. The inflammatory process that isalways present in HT is common to other conditions considered as predisposing toneoplasms, a fact that has been attributed to the production of free radicals, and toaccumulation of oxidative DNA damage and possible facilitator of neoplasia development.Figure 2 shows the histopathological pattern ofPTC with lymphocytic infiltration, fibrosis and glandular atrophy, similar to whatoccurs at HT, a fact that is attributed by other authors to the attempt of the body tolimit the pathological process(18).

Bottom Line: Typical cytopathological aspects and/or classical histopathological findings were taken into consideration in the diagnosis of HT, and only histopathological results were considered in the diagnosis of PTC.In spite of the absence of association between HT and PCT, the possibility of malignancy in HT should always be considered because of the coexistence of the two diseases already reported in the literature.Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Associate Professor III, Department of Pathology and Legal Medicine at Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Endocrinologist at Hospital São Rafael, Salvador, BA, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To evaluate the association between Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) and papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC).

Materials and methods: The patients were evaluated by ultrasonography-guided fine needle aspiration cytology. Typical cytopathological aspects and/or classical histopathological findings were taken into consideration in the diagnosis of HT, and only histopathological results were considered in the diagnosis of PTC.

Results: Among 1,049 patients with multi- or uninodular goiter (903 women and 146 men), 173 (16.5%) had cytopathological features of thyroiditis. Thirty-three (67.4%) out of the 49 operated patients had PTC, 9 (27.3%) of them with histopathological features of HT. Five (31.3%) out of the 16 patients with non-malignant disease also had HT. In the groups with HT, PTC, and PCT+HT, the female prevalence rate was 100%, 91.6%, and 77.8%, respectively. Mean age was 41.5, 43.3, and 48.5 years, respectively. No association was observed between the two diseases in the present study where HT occurred in 31.1% of the benign cases and in 27.3% of malignant cases (p = 0.8).

Conclusion: In spite of the absence of association between HT and PCT, the possibility of malignancy in HT should always be considered because of the coexistence of the two diseases already reported in the literature.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus