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Biofumigation on Post-Harvest Diseases of Fruits Using a New Volatile-Producing Fungus of Ceratocystis fimbriata.

Li Q, Wu L, Hao J, Luo L, Cao Y, Li J - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Two post-harvest diseases, peach brown rot caused by Monilinia fructicola and citrus green mold caused by Penicillium digitatum, were controlled during a 4-day storage by enclosing wound-inoculated fruits with 10 standard diameter Petri plate cultures of C. fimbriata in a 15 L box.The fruits were freshly inoculated at onset of storage and the cultures of C. fimbriata were 6 days old.Percentage of control was 92 and 97%, respectively.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Beijing Engineering Research Center of Seed and Plant Health (BERC-SPH) / Beijing Key Laboratory of Seed Disease Testing and Control (BKL-SDTC), Beijing, P. R. China.

ABSTRACT
A variety of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced by Ceratocystis fimbriata have strong bioactivity against a wide range of fungi, bacteria and oomycetes. Mycelial growth, conidial production, and spore germination of fungi and oomycetes were significantly inhibited after exposure to cultures of C. fimbriata, and colony formation of bacteria was also inhibited. Two post-harvest diseases, peach brown rot caused by Monilinia fructicola and citrus green mold caused by Penicillium digitatum, were controlled during a 4-day storage by enclosing wound-inoculated fruits with 10 standard diameter Petri plate cultures of C. fimbriata in a 15 L box. The fruits were freshly inoculated at onset of storage and the cultures of C. fimbriata were 6 days old. Percentage of control was 92 and 97%, respectively. After exposure to C. fimbriata VOCs, severely misshapen hyphae and conidia of these two post-harvest pathogens were observed by scanning electron microscopy, and their pathogenicity was lost or greatly reduced.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Hyphal and conidial morphology of Monilinia fructicola treated by the VOCs from Ceratocystis fimbriata observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM).(a) Mycelia of M. fructicola growing on PDA medium. (b-e) Misshapen mycelia of M. fructicola with 6-day exposure to the VOCs from C. fimbriata. (f-i) Recovered mycelia of M. fructicola was transferred to a fresh PDA plate after 6-day exposure to the VOCs from C. fimbriata and grown for another four days. (j) Conidia of M. fructicola. (k) Misshapen conidium of M. fructicola with 6-day exposure to the VOCs from C. fimbriata. (l) Recovered conidia of M. fructicola transferred to a fresh PDA plate after 6-day exposure to the VOCs from C. fimbriata and grown for another four days.
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pone.0132009.g006: Hyphal and conidial morphology of Monilinia fructicola treated by the VOCs from Ceratocystis fimbriata observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM).(a) Mycelia of M. fructicola growing on PDA medium. (b-e) Misshapen mycelia of M. fructicola with 6-day exposure to the VOCs from C. fimbriata. (f-i) Recovered mycelia of M. fructicola was transferred to a fresh PDA plate after 6-day exposure to the VOCs from C. fimbriata and grown for another four days. (j) Conidia of M. fructicola. (k) Misshapen conidium of M. fructicola with 6-day exposure to the VOCs from C. fimbriata. (l) Recovered conidia of M. fructicola transferred to a fresh PDA plate after 6-day exposure to the VOCs from C. fimbriata and grown for another four days.

Mentions: To evaluate the morphological change of the test pathogens treated by VOCs from C. fimbriata, the morphology of the treated mycelia and conidia was observed by SEM after 5 days treatment. In the control samples, M. fructicola grew healthily on PDA medium, presented regular and homogeneous mycelia with typical tapered apices (Fig 6A), and had normal barrel-shaped conidia (Fig 6J). Both hyphae and conidia had a smooth appearing cell wall surface. The treated samples exhibited abnormal growth with irregular distortions. The severely degenerating hyphae were collapsed, curling, distorted or twisted (Fig 6B and 6C), with swollen apexes with extensive branches (Fig 6D–6F), and the conidia were enlarged and distorted (Fig 6K). After recovering on a fresh PDA plate, M. fructicola still had a similarly misshapen morphology with that of the treated fungus; the hyphae and conidia were swollen, branched and twisted (Fig 6G–6I and 6L). Measurement results showed that the diameter of M. fructicola and P. digitatum control hyphae was significantly wider than that of treated and recovered treatment. The conidia size of M. fructicola in treated and recovered cultures was significantly larger than that in the control. However, there was no significant difference among the treated, recovered or normal P. digitatum cultures. One hundred mycelial tips were observed in each treatment for M. fructicola and P. digitatum, and almost all of the observed hyphae in the treated or recovered cultures were branched, compared to that with regular morphology in the control (Table 4).


Biofumigation on Post-Harvest Diseases of Fruits Using a New Volatile-Producing Fungus of Ceratocystis fimbriata.

Li Q, Wu L, Hao J, Luo L, Cao Y, Li J - PLoS ONE (2015)

Hyphal and conidial morphology of Monilinia fructicola treated by the VOCs from Ceratocystis fimbriata observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM).(a) Mycelia of M. fructicola growing on PDA medium. (b-e) Misshapen mycelia of M. fructicola with 6-day exposure to the VOCs from C. fimbriata. (f-i) Recovered mycelia of M. fructicola was transferred to a fresh PDA plate after 6-day exposure to the VOCs from C. fimbriata and grown for another four days. (j) Conidia of M. fructicola. (k) Misshapen conidium of M. fructicola with 6-day exposure to the VOCs from C. fimbriata. (l) Recovered conidia of M. fructicola transferred to a fresh PDA plate after 6-day exposure to the VOCs from C. fimbriata and grown for another four days.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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pone.0132009.g006: Hyphal and conidial morphology of Monilinia fructicola treated by the VOCs from Ceratocystis fimbriata observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM).(a) Mycelia of M. fructicola growing on PDA medium. (b-e) Misshapen mycelia of M. fructicola with 6-day exposure to the VOCs from C. fimbriata. (f-i) Recovered mycelia of M. fructicola was transferred to a fresh PDA plate after 6-day exposure to the VOCs from C. fimbriata and grown for another four days. (j) Conidia of M. fructicola. (k) Misshapen conidium of M. fructicola with 6-day exposure to the VOCs from C. fimbriata. (l) Recovered conidia of M. fructicola transferred to a fresh PDA plate after 6-day exposure to the VOCs from C. fimbriata and grown for another four days.
Mentions: To evaluate the morphological change of the test pathogens treated by VOCs from C. fimbriata, the morphology of the treated mycelia and conidia was observed by SEM after 5 days treatment. In the control samples, M. fructicola grew healthily on PDA medium, presented regular and homogeneous mycelia with typical tapered apices (Fig 6A), and had normal barrel-shaped conidia (Fig 6J). Both hyphae and conidia had a smooth appearing cell wall surface. The treated samples exhibited abnormal growth with irregular distortions. The severely degenerating hyphae were collapsed, curling, distorted or twisted (Fig 6B and 6C), with swollen apexes with extensive branches (Fig 6D–6F), and the conidia were enlarged and distorted (Fig 6K). After recovering on a fresh PDA plate, M. fructicola still had a similarly misshapen morphology with that of the treated fungus; the hyphae and conidia were swollen, branched and twisted (Fig 6G–6I and 6L). Measurement results showed that the diameter of M. fructicola and P. digitatum control hyphae was significantly wider than that of treated and recovered treatment. The conidia size of M. fructicola in treated and recovered cultures was significantly larger than that in the control. However, there was no significant difference among the treated, recovered or normal P. digitatum cultures. One hundred mycelial tips were observed in each treatment for M. fructicola and P. digitatum, and almost all of the observed hyphae in the treated or recovered cultures were branched, compared to that with regular morphology in the control (Table 4).

Bottom Line: Two post-harvest diseases, peach brown rot caused by Monilinia fructicola and citrus green mold caused by Penicillium digitatum, were controlled during a 4-day storage by enclosing wound-inoculated fruits with 10 standard diameter Petri plate cultures of C. fimbriata in a 15 L box.The fruits were freshly inoculated at onset of storage and the cultures of C. fimbriata were 6 days old.Percentage of control was 92 and 97%, respectively.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Beijing Engineering Research Center of Seed and Plant Health (BERC-SPH) / Beijing Key Laboratory of Seed Disease Testing and Control (BKL-SDTC), Beijing, P. R. China.

ABSTRACT
A variety of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced by Ceratocystis fimbriata have strong bioactivity against a wide range of fungi, bacteria and oomycetes. Mycelial growth, conidial production, and spore germination of fungi and oomycetes were significantly inhibited after exposure to cultures of C. fimbriata, and colony formation of bacteria was also inhibited. Two post-harvest diseases, peach brown rot caused by Monilinia fructicola and citrus green mold caused by Penicillium digitatum, were controlled during a 4-day storage by enclosing wound-inoculated fruits with 10 standard diameter Petri plate cultures of C. fimbriata in a 15 L box. The fruits were freshly inoculated at onset of storage and the cultures of C. fimbriata were 6 days old. Percentage of control was 92 and 97%, respectively. After exposure to C. fimbriata VOCs, severely misshapen hyphae and conidia of these two post-harvest pathogens were observed by scanning electron microscopy, and their pathogenicity was lost or greatly reduced.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus