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Linking Colleague Support to Employees' Promotive Voice: A Moderated Mediation Model.

Xie XY, Ling CD, Mo SJ, Luan K - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Analyses of multi-source data from 51 cross-functional sources (51 team supervisors and 162 employees) showed that employees' felt obligation for constructive change positively mediates the relationship between colleague support and promotive voice behavior.Moreover, the impact of colleague support on felt obligation for constructive change is stronger when there is a low level of subgroup formation in the team.Theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Management, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China.

ABSTRACT
Promotive voice is essential for improving team and organization performance. Yet in the current literature, less was known regarding the psychological reasons why people engage in promotive voice. Through the lens of social exchange, we proposed that employees who received support from colleagues may develop higher level of felt obligation for constructive change which leads to promotive voice. Analyses of multi-source data from 51 cross-functional sources (51 team supervisors and 162 employees) showed that employees' felt obligation for constructive change positively mediates the relationship between colleague support and promotive voice behavior. Moreover, the impact of colleague support on felt obligation for constructive change is stronger when there is a low level of subgroup formation in the team. Theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Path coefficients from the selected model.For reasons of brevity, we do not present the effects of team size and procedural justice climate on subgroup formation and individual-level variables or the effects of individual-level gender, age, team tenure, LMX and team identification on felt obligation for constructive change and promotive voice. Interested readers may contact the corresponding author for estimates of these effects. ** p < .01, * p < .05.
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pone.0132123.g002: Path coefficients from the selected model.For reasons of brevity, we do not present the effects of team size and procedural justice climate on subgroup formation and individual-level variables or the effects of individual-level gender, age, team tenure, LMX and team identification on felt obligation for constructive change and promotive voice. Interested readers may contact the corresponding author for estimates of these effects. ** p < .01, * p < .05.

Mentions: To test the hypothesized mediating effect (i.e., Hypothesis 1) in the hypothesized model (Fig 1), we established a multilevel model that specifies the Level 1 random slope effect of colleague support on felt obligation for constructive change and the Level 1 random slope effects of felt obligation for constructive change on employee promotive voice. The unstandardized coefficient estimates of the hypothesized model are presented in Fig 2. Following Bauer, Preacher, and Gil [53], the covariances among the random slope effects were also estimated to test the Level 1 indirect effects. We controlled for the direct effect of colleague support on the dependent variables. We included gender, age, tenure, LMX and team identification as control variables with fixed effects on employees’ felt obligation for constructive change and promotive voice. We also controlled for the effect of team size and procedural justice climate on team-level subgroup formation and on individual-level employees’ felt obligation for constructive change and promotive voice. To facilitate the interpretation of the research model, individual-level variables, i.e., gender, age, tenure, LMX, team identification and colleague support, were all group mean centered, while team-level variables, i.e., team size, procedural justice climate and subgroup formation, were grand mean centered.


Linking Colleague Support to Employees' Promotive Voice: A Moderated Mediation Model.

Xie XY, Ling CD, Mo SJ, Luan K - PLoS ONE (2015)

Path coefficients from the selected model.For reasons of brevity, we do not present the effects of team size and procedural justice climate on subgroup formation and individual-level variables or the effects of individual-level gender, age, team tenure, LMX and team identification on felt obligation for constructive change and promotive voice. Interested readers may contact the corresponding author for estimates of these effects. ** p < .01, * p < .05.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4492547&req=5

pone.0132123.g002: Path coefficients from the selected model.For reasons of brevity, we do not present the effects of team size and procedural justice climate on subgroup formation and individual-level variables or the effects of individual-level gender, age, team tenure, LMX and team identification on felt obligation for constructive change and promotive voice. Interested readers may contact the corresponding author for estimates of these effects. ** p < .01, * p < .05.
Mentions: To test the hypothesized mediating effect (i.e., Hypothesis 1) in the hypothesized model (Fig 1), we established a multilevel model that specifies the Level 1 random slope effect of colleague support on felt obligation for constructive change and the Level 1 random slope effects of felt obligation for constructive change on employee promotive voice. The unstandardized coefficient estimates of the hypothesized model are presented in Fig 2. Following Bauer, Preacher, and Gil [53], the covariances among the random slope effects were also estimated to test the Level 1 indirect effects. We controlled for the direct effect of colleague support on the dependent variables. We included gender, age, tenure, LMX and team identification as control variables with fixed effects on employees’ felt obligation for constructive change and promotive voice. We also controlled for the effect of team size and procedural justice climate on team-level subgroup formation and on individual-level employees’ felt obligation for constructive change and promotive voice. To facilitate the interpretation of the research model, individual-level variables, i.e., gender, age, tenure, LMX, team identification and colleague support, were all group mean centered, while team-level variables, i.e., team size, procedural justice climate and subgroup formation, were grand mean centered.

Bottom Line: Analyses of multi-source data from 51 cross-functional sources (51 team supervisors and 162 employees) showed that employees' felt obligation for constructive change positively mediates the relationship between colleague support and promotive voice behavior.Moreover, the impact of colleague support on felt obligation for constructive change is stronger when there is a low level of subgroup formation in the team.Theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Management, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China.

ABSTRACT
Promotive voice is essential for improving team and organization performance. Yet in the current literature, less was known regarding the psychological reasons why people engage in promotive voice. Through the lens of social exchange, we proposed that employees who received support from colleagues may develop higher level of felt obligation for constructive change which leads to promotive voice. Analyses of multi-source data from 51 cross-functional sources (51 team supervisors and 162 employees) showed that employees' felt obligation for constructive change positively mediates the relationship between colleague support and promotive voice behavior. Moreover, the impact of colleague support on felt obligation for constructive change is stronger when there is a low level of subgroup formation in the team. Theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed.

No MeSH data available.