Limits...
Cattle Management for Dairying in Scandinavia's Earliest Neolithic.

Gron KJ, Montgomery J, Rowley-Conwy P - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: B.C.) site of Almhov in Scania, Sweden.As this is a difficult, intensive, and time-consuming strategy, these data demonstrate complex farming practices by early Neolithic farmers.This result offers strong support for immigration-based explanations of agricultural origins in southern Scandinavia on the grounds that such a specialised skill set cannot represent the piecemeal incorporation of agricultural techniques into an existing hunter-gatherer-fisher economy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Archaeology, Durham University, Durham, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
New evidence for cattle husbandry practices during the earliest period of the southern Scandinavian Neolithic indicates multiple birth seasons and dairying from its start. Sequential sampling of tooth enamel carbonate carbon and oxygen isotope ratio analyses and strontium isotopic provenancing indicate more than one season of birth in locally reared cattle at the earliest Neolithic Funnel Beaker (EN I TRB, 3950-3500 cal. B.C.) site of Almhov in Scania, Sweden. The main purpose for which cattle are manipulated to give birth in more than one season is to prolong lactation for the production of milk and dairy-based products. As this is a difficult, intensive, and time-consuming strategy, these data demonstrate complex farming practices by early Neolithic farmers. This result offers strong support for immigration-based explanations of agricultural origins in southern Scandinavia on the grounds that such a specialised skill set cannot represent the piecemeal incorporation of agricultural techniques into an existing hunter-gatherer-fisher economy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The location of Almhov in Scania.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4492493&req=5

pone.0131267.g001: The location of Almhov in Scania.

Mentions: In this study, we report data on birth seasonality and provenance of domesticated cattle (Bos taurus) deriving from Almhov, a Neolithic site in Scania, southern Sweden, located near the modern city of Malmö (Fig 1). The sample here represents one of the largest, securely dated assemblages deriving from the EN I TRB, and one of the only sites to yield remains of more than a few domestic cattle. Sample size is modest, but material dating from this period is extremely rare, and the Almhov sample currently represents the only opportunity to investigate cattle husbandry at a single site in the region. Our successful determination of basic information concerning birth seasonality in cattle represents the first data of its kind from this crucial early period of the Scandinavian Neolithic. While the presence of dairy products at this date is established in Sweden [15], our data illustrate how cattle were manipulated to maximize milk yields as a primary mode of agricultural production at the very start of farming.


Cattle Management for Dairying in Scandinavia's Earliest Neolithic.

Gron KJ, Montgomery J, Rowley-Conwy P - PLoS ONE (2015)

The location of Almhov in Scania.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4492493&req=5

pone.0131267.g001: The location of Almhov in Scania.
Mentions: In this study, we report data on birth seasonality and provenance of domesticated cattle (Bos taurus) deriving from Almhov, a Neolithic site in Scania, southern Sweden, located near the modern city of Malmö (Fig 1). The sample here represents one of the largest, securely dated assemblages deriving from the EN I TRB, and one of the only sites to yield remains of more than a few domestic cattle. Sample size is modest, but material dating from this period is extremely rare, and the Almhov sample currently represents the only opportunity to investigate cattle husbandry at a single site in the region. Our successful determination of basic information concerning birth seasonality in cattle represents the first data of its kind from this crucial early period of the Scandinavian Neolithic. While the presence of dairy products at this date is established in Sweden [15], our data illustrate how cattle were manipulated to maximize milk yields as a primary mode of agricultural production at the very start of farming.

Bottom Line: B.C.) site of Almhov in Scania, Sweden.As this is a difficult, intensive, and time-consuming strategy, these data demonstrate complex farming practices by early Neolithic farmers.This result offers strong support for immigration-based explanations of agricultural origins in southern Scandinavia on the grounds that such a specialised skill set cannot represent the piecemeal incorporation of agricultural techniques into an existing hunter-gatherer-fisher economy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Archaeology, Durham University, Durham, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
New evidence for cattle husbandry practices during the earliest period of the southern Scandinavian Neolithic indicates multiple birth seasons and dairying from its start. Sequential sampling of tooth enamel carbonate carbon and oxygen isotope ratio analyses and strontium isotopic provenancing indicate more than one season of birth in locally reared cattle at the earliest Neolithic Funnel Beaker (EN I TRB, 3950-3500 cal. B.C.) site of Almhov in Scania, Sweden. The main purpose for which cattle are manipulated to give birth in more than one season is to prolong lactation for the production of milk and dairy-based products. As this is a difficult, intensive, and time-consuming strategy, these data demonstrate complex farming practices by early Neolithic farmers. This result offers strong support for immigration-based explanations of agricultural origins in southern Scandinavia on the grounds that such a specialised skill set cannot represent the piecemeal incorporation of agricultural techniques into an existing hunter-gatherer-fisher economy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus