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Treadmill exercise enhances spatial learning ability through suppressing hippocampal apoptosis in Huntington's disease rats.

Ji ES, Kim YM, Shin MS, Kim CJ, Lee KS, Kim K, Ha J, Chung YR - J Exerc Rehabil (2015)

Bottom Line: Spatial learning ability and motor coordination were determined by radial 8-arm maze test and rota-rod test.Immunohistochemistry for caspase-3 and western blot for Bax and Bcl-2 were also conducted for the detection of apoptosis.In the present results, spatial learning ability and motor coordination were deteriorated by intrastriatal injection of quinolinic acid.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Huntington's disease is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion, and characterized as involuntary movement. Quinolinic acid has been used to produce an animal model of Huntington's disease. In the present study, the effect of treadmill exercise on spatial-learning ability and motor coordination focusing on the apoptosis in the hippocampus was investigated using quinolinic acid-induced Huntington's disease rats. Huntington's disease was induced by unilateral intrastriatal injection of quinolinic acid (2 μL of 100 nmol) using stereotaxic instrument. The rats in the treadmill exercise groups were subjected to run on a treadmill for 30 min once a day during 14 days. Spatial learning ability and motor coordination were determined by radial 8-arm maze test and rota-rod test. Immunohistochemistry for caspase-3 and western blot for Bax and Bcl-2 were also conducted for the detection of apoptosis. In the present results, spatial learning ability and motor coordination were deteriorated by intrastriatal injection of quinolinic acid. In contrast, treadmill exercise exerted ameliorating effect on quinolinic acid-induced deterioration of spatial learning ability and motor coordination. Bcl-2 expression in the hippocampus was de-creased and expressions of casepase-3 and Bax in the hippocampus were increased in the quinolinic acid-induced Huntington's disease rats. Treadmill exercise increased Bcl-2 expression and decreased expressions of casepase-3 and Bax in the Huntington's disease rats. The present results showed that treadmill exercise might ameliorate quinolinic acid-induced loss of spatial learning ability and motor coordination by suppressing apoptosis in the hippocampus.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effect of treadmill exercise on the motor coordination in the rota-rod test. (A) Sham-operation group, (B) sham-operation and treadmill exercise group, (C) Huntington’s disease-induced group, (D) Huntington’s disease-induced and treadmill exercise group. *represents P<0.05 compared to the sham-operation group. #represents P<0.05 compared to the Huntington’s disease-induced group. The data are expressed as the mean±standard error of the mean (SEM).
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f2-jer-11-3-133: Effect of treadmill exercise on the motor coordination in the rota-rod test. (A) Sham-operation group, (B) sham-operation and treadmill exercise group, (C) Huntington’s disease-induced group, (D) Huntington’s disease-induced and treadmill exercise group. *represents P<0.05 compared to the sham-operation group. #represents P<0.05 compared to the Huntington’s disease-induced group. The data are expressed as the mean±standard error of the mean (SEM).

Mentions: The effect of treadmill exercise on the motor coordination in the rota-rod test is presented in Fig. 2. The time score was 225.25±25.61 sec in the sham-operation group, 256.25±21.44 sec in the sham-operation and exercise group, 81.87±17.15 sec in the Huntington’s disease-induced group, and 166.43±30.71 sec in the Huntington’s disease-induced and treadmill exercise group. The present results indicate that motor coordination was reduced by inducing Huntington’s disease (P<0.05), however, treadmill exercise recovered motor coordination in the Huntington’s disease rats (P<0.05).


Treadmill exercise enhances spatial learning ability through suppressing hippocampal apoptosis in Huntington's disease rats.

Ji ES, Kim YM, Shin MS, Kim CJ, Lee KS, Kim K, Ha J, Chung YR - J Exerc Rehabil (2015)

Effect of treadmill exercise on the motor coordination in the rota-rod test. (A) Sham-operation group, (B) sham-operation and treadmill exercise group, (C) Huntington’s disease-induced group, (D) Huntington’s disease-induced and treadmill exercise group. *represents P<0.05 compared to the sham-operation group. #represents P<0.05 compared to the Huntington’s disease-induced group. The data are expressed as the mean±standard error of the mean (SEM).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4492422&req=5

f2-jer-11-3-133: Effect of treadmill exercise on the motor coordination in the rota-rod test. (A) Sham-operation group, (B) sham-operation and treadmill exercise group, (C) Huntington’s disease-induced group, (D) Huntington’s disease-induced and treadmill exercise group. *represents P<0.05 compared to the sham-operation group. #represents P<0.05 compared to the Huntington’s disease-induced group. The data are expressed as the mean±standard error of the mean (SEM).
Mentions: The effect of treadmill exercise on the motor coordination in the rota-rod test is presented in Fig. 2. The time score was 225.25±25.61 sec in the sham-operation group, 256.25±21.44 sec in the sham-operation and exercise group, 81.87±17.15 sec in the Huntington’s disease-induced group, and 166.43±30.71 sec in the Huntington’s disease-induced and treadmill exercise group. The present results indicate that motor coordination was reduced by inducing Huntington’s disease (P<0.05), however, treadmill exercise recovered motor coordination in the Huntington’s disease rats (P<0.05).

Bottom Line: Spatial learning ability and motor coordination were determined by radial 8-arm maze test and rota-rod test.Immunohistochemistry for caspase-3 and western blot for Bax and Bcl-2 were also conducted for the detection of apoptosis.In the present results, spatial learning ability and motor coordination were deteriorated by intrastriatal injection of quinolinic acid.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Huntington's disease is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion, and characterized as involuntary movement. Quinolinic acid has been used to produce an animal model of Huntington's disease. In the present study, the effect of treadmill exercise on spatial-learning ability and motor coordination focusing on the apoptosis in the hippocampus was investigated using quinolinic acid-induced Huntington's disease rats. Huntington's disease was induced by unilateral intrastriatal injection of quinolinic acid (2 μL of 100 nmol) using stereotaxic instrument. The rats in the treadmill exercise groups were subjected to run on a treadmill for 30 min once a day during 14 days. Spatial learning ability and motor coordination were determined by radial 8-arm maze test and rota-rod test. Immunohistochemistry for caspase-3 and western blot for Bax and Bcl-2 were also conducted for the detection of apoptosis. In the present results, spatial learning ability and motor coordination were deteriorated by intrastriatal injection of quinolinic acid. In contrast, treadmill exercise exerted ameliorating effect on quinolinic acid-induced deterioration of spatial learning ability and motor coordination. Bcl-2 expression in the hippocampus was de-creased and expressions of casepase-3 and Bax in the hippocampus were increased in the quinolinic acid-induced Huntington's disease rats. Treadmill exercise increased Bcl-2 expression and decreased expressions of casepase-3 and Bax in the Huntington's disease rats. The present results showed that treadmill exercise might ameliorate quinolinic acid-induced loss of spatial learning ability and motor coordination by suppressing apoptosis in the hippocampus.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus