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A Transparent Window into Biology: A Primer on Caenorhabditis elegans.

Corsi AK, Wightman B, Chalfie M - Genetics (2015)

Bottom Line: We survey the basic anatomical features, common technical approaches, and important discoveries in C. elegans research.Key to studying C. elegans has been the ability to address biological problems genetically, using both forward and reverse genetics, both at the level of the entire organism and at the level of the single, identified cell.These possibilities make C. elegans useful not only in research laboratories, but also in the classroom where it can be used to excite students who actually can see what is happening inside live cells and tissues.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biology Department, The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 corsi@cua.edu wightman@muhlenberg.edu mc21@columbia.edu.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

C. elegans mutant phenotypes. Wild-type animals (WT) are approximately 1 mm long with a smooth exterior, and they move in a sinusoidal pattern. Rolling (Rol) animals twist their body like a corkscrew and as a result often remain in the same region moving in a circular pattern. Dumpy (Dpy) animals are shorter than wild type. Multivulvae (Muv) hermaphrodites have protrusions along the ventral side (white arrowheads) where vulvae form but are not able to attach to the uterus. Strain sources: D. Eisenmann and A. Golden.
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fig6: C. elegans mutant phenotypes. Wild-type animals (WT) are approximately 1 mm long with a smooth exterior, and they move in a sinusoidal pattern. Rolling (Rol) animals twist their body like a corkscrew and as a result often remain in the same region moving in a circular pattern. Dumpy (Dpy) animals are shorter than wild type. Multivulvae (Muv) hermaphrodites have protrusions along the ventral side (white arrowheads) where vulvae form but are not able to attach to the uterus. Strain sources: D. Eisenmann and A. Golden.

Mentions: Mutations in several genes needed for cuticle formation produce visible phenotypes (Figure 6). Mutations in collagen genes can result in animals that move in a corkscrew fashion [the Roller (Rol) phenotype] or that have normal width but reduced length [the Dumpy (Dpy) phenotype]. Other mutations affect the struts formed between layers of the adult cuticle, resulting in fluid-filled blisters [the Blister (Bli) phenotype]. Still other mutations make the animals longer than normal [the Long (Lon) phenotype]. At the end of each larval stage (Figure 2), C. elegans sheds its cuticle and secretes a new one to accommodate the growing organism. Genes involved in cuticle formation are regulated so that the cuticle is reestablished after each molt.


A Transparent Window into Biology: A Primer on Caenorhabditis elegans.

Corsi AK, Wightman B, Chalfie M - Genetics (2015)

C. elegans mutant phenotypes. Wild-type animals (WT) are approximately 1 mm long with a smooth exterior, and they move in a sinusoidal pattern. Rolling (Rol) animals twist their body like a corkscrew and as a result often remain in the same region moving in a circular pattern. Dumpy (Dpy) animals are shorter than wild type. Multivulvae (Muv) hermaphrodites have protrusions along the ventral side (white arrowheads) where vulvae form but are not able to attach to the uterus. Strain sources: D. Eisenmann and A. Golden.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4492366&req=5

fig6: C. elegans mutant phenotypes. Wild-type animals (WT) are approximately 1 mm long with a smooth exterior, and they move in a sinusoidal pattern. Rolling (Rol) animals twist their body like a corkscrew and as a result often remain in the same region moving in a circular pattern. Dumpy (Dpy) animals are shorter than wild type. Multivulvae (Muv) hermaphrodites have protrusions along the ventral side (white arrowheads) where vulvae form but are not able to attach to the uterus. Strain sources: D. Eisenmann and A. Golden.
Mentions: Mutations in several genes needed for cuticle formation produce visible phenotypes (Figure 6). Mutations in collagen genes can result in animals that move in a corkscrew fashion [the Roller (Rol) phenotype] or that have normal width but reduced length [the Dumpy (Dpy) phenotype]. Other mutations affect the struts formed between layers of the adult cuticle, resulting in fluid-filled blisters [the Blister (Bli) phenotype]. Still other mutations make the animals longer than normal [the Long (Lon) phenotype]. At the end of each larval stage (Figure 2), C. elegans sheds its cuticle and secretes a new one to accommodate the growing organism. Genes involved in cuticle formation are regulated so that the cuticle is reestablished after each molt.

Bottom Line: We survey the basic anatomical features, common technical approaches, and important discoveries in C. elegans research.Key to studying C. elegans has been the ability to address biological problems genetically, using both forward and reverse genetics, both at the level of the entire organism and at the level of the single, identified cell.These possibilities make C. elegans useful not only in research laboratories, but also in the classroom where it can be used to excite students who actually can see what is happening inside live cells and tissues.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biology Department, The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 corsi@cua.edu wightman@muhlenberg.edu mc21@columbia.edu.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus