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Association of Dietary Vitamin D and Calcium With Genetic Polymorphisms in Colorectal Neoplasia.

Park Y, Kim J - J Cancer Prev (2015)

Bottom Line: Colorectal carcinogenesis was discussed in conjunction with dietary factors and mediating genetic factors.This finding may imply the necessity of considering the environmental differences and genetic variations existing between individuals or specified populations.Therefore, further studies are required to investigate modifiable risk factors in diverse locations to derive useful implications for colorectal neoplasia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cancer Control and Policy, Graduate School of Cancer Science and Policy, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Korea.

ABSTRACT
The incidence trends of colorectal cancer have varied over time, and there is wide geographical variation across the world. Regarding colorectal cancer, diverse modifiable environmental or intrinsic risk factors have been investigated. This review summarizes the effects of both dietary intake of vitamin D and calcium in particular and diet-associated genetic factors on colorectal cancer risk. We searched the electronic database PubMed for articles published between January 2000 and March 2015. We reviewed case-control studies that included dietary factors, genetic polymorphisms, and gene-diet interactions in association with colorectal cancer risk. Overall, 21 studies were selected as eligible studies. These studies demonstrated that dietary consumption of vitamin D and calcium may decrease the risk of colorectal cancer or adenoma. Colorectal carcinogenesis was discussed in conjunction with dietary factors and mediating genetic factors. The epidemiological findings suggested that the gene-diet interactions may possibly alter the associations between dietary intake, genetic polymorphisms, and the risk of colorectal cancer. However, the reported effects of the same potential factors on colorectal cancer risk were inconsistent, depending on the study population and geographical location. This finding may imply the necessity of considering the environmental differences and genetic variations existing between individuals or specified populations. Therefore, further studies are required to investigate modifiable risk factors in diverse locations to derive useful implications for colorectal neoplasia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Flow diagram detailing the procedures for selecting eligible studies.
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f1-jcp-20-97: Flow diagram detailing the procedures for selecting eligible studies.

Mentions: We assessed the relevance of the studies using a hierarchical approach based on the title, abstract, and full-text article. A flow chart depicting the literature search and the selection of 21 eligible studies is presented in Figure 1. We excluded experimental studies that aimed to examine the association with colorectal neoplasia risk using non-epidemiological approaches (n = 5), as well as laboratory studies conducted with animals or cell lines (n = 273). The articles comprising a meta-analysis (n = 3) or a systematic review (n = 8) also were not included in the current study. We excluded certain studies consisting of randomized clinical trials or survival analyses of risk association between cancer cases and healthy controls (n = 10). Four articles were additionally included by using the same keywords and checking for eligible references to other articles. We assessed the study objectives and risk of bias of each selected article by using the National Institute for Clinical Excellence methodology checklist for case-control study.15 The contents of quality assessment included selection of participants, assessment, confounding factors, and statistical analysis. We summarized previous studies based on dietary factors, vitamin D and calcium and collected relevant findings associated with CRC risk. For each eligible study, we extracted the publication year, the study design, the geographical location, the number of study subjects (cases and controls), any diet of interest and related genetic polymorphism, and gene-diet interactions associated with a modified CRC risk.


Association of Dietary Vitamin D and Calcium With Genetic Polymorphisms in Colorectal Neoplasia.

Park Y, Kim J - J Cancer Prev (2015)

Flow diagram detailing the procedures for selecting eligible studies.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4492365&req=5

f1-jcp-20-97: Flow diagram detailing the procedures for selecting eligible studies.
Mentions: We assessed the relevance of the studies using a hierarchical approach based on the title, abstract, and full-text article. A flow chart depicting the literature search and the selection of 21 eligible studies is presented in Figure 1. We excluded experimental studies that aimed to examine the association with colorectal neoplasia risk using non-epidemiological approaches (n = 5), as well as laboratory studies conducted with animals or cell lines (n = 273). The articles comprising a meta-analysis (n = 3) or a systematic review (n = 8) also were not included in the current study. We excluded certain studies consisting of randomized clinical trials or survival analyses of risk association between cancer cases and healthy controls (n = 10). Four articles were additionally included by using the same keywords and checking for eligible references to other articles. We assessed the study objectives and risk of bias of each selected article by using the National Institute for Clinical Excellence methodology checklist for case-control study.15 The contents of quality assessment included selection of participants, assessment, confounding factors, and statistical analysis. We summarized previous studies based on dietary factors, vitamin D and calcium and collected relevant findings associated with CRC risk. For each eligible study, we extracted the publication year, the study design, the geographical location, the number of study subjects (cases and controls), any diet of interest and related genetic polymorphism, and gene-diet interactions associated with a modified CRC risk.

Bottom Line: Colorectal carcinogenesis was discussed in conjunction with dietary factors and mediating genetic factors.This finding may imply the necessity of considering the environmental differences and genetic variations existing between individuals or specified populations.Therefore, further studies are required to investigate modifiable risk factors in diverse locations to derive useful implications for colorectal neoplasia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cancer Control and Policy, Graduate School of Cancer Science and Policy, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Korea.

ABSTRACT
The incidence trends of colorectal cancer have varied over time, and there is wide geographical variation across the world. Regarding colorectal cancer, diverse modifiable environmental or intrinsic risk factors have been investigated. This review summarizes the effects of both dietary intake of vitamin D and calcium in particular and diet-associated genetic factors on colorectal cancer risk. We searched the electronic database PubMed for articles published between January 2000 and March 2015. We reviewed case-control studies that included dietary factors, genetic polymorphisms, and gene-diet interactions in association with colorectal cancer risk. Overall, 21 studies were selected as eligible studies. These studies demonstrated that dietary consumption of vitamin D and calcium may decrease the risk of colorectal cancer or adenoma. Colorectal carcinogenesis was discussed in conjunction with dietary factors and mediating genetic factors. The epidemiological findings suggested that the gene-diet interactions may possibly alter the associations between dietary intake, genetic polymorphisms, and the risk of colorectal cancer. However, the reported effects of the same potential factors on colorectal cancer risk were inconsistent, depending on the study population and geographical location. This finding may imply the necessity of considering the environmental differences and genetic variations existing between individuals or specified populations. Therefore, further studies are required to investigate modifiable risk factors in diverse locations to derive useful implications for colorectal neoplasia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus