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Management of inferior vena cava thrombosis after blunt liver injury.

Kim KY, So BJ, Park DE - Korean J Hepatobiliary Pancreat Surg (2014)

Bottom Line: Inferior vena cava (IVC) thrombosis after traumatic liver injury is an extremely rare condition, and only 12 cases have been reported in the English literature since 1911.The patient denied any symptoms of thrombophlebitis and did not have any evidence of hypercoagulable state.We placed an IVC filter via the right jugular vein and started the anticoagulation treatment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery, Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Iksan, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Inferior vena cava (IVC) thrombosis after traumatic liver injury is an extremely rare condition, and only 12 cases have been reported in the English literature since 1911. We report a case of a 26-year-old man who presented with IVC thrombosis after blunt liver injury. IVC thrombosis was incidentally detected by computed tomography 15 days after conservative management of blunt liver injury. The patient denied any symptoms of thrombophlebitis and did not have any evidence of hypercoagulable state. We placed an IVC filter via the right jugular vein and started the anticoagulation treatment. The patient recovered successfully without operative treatment and IVC thrombosis disappeared completely two months later. We suggest that that the possibility of IVC thrombosis should be considered in patients with a large hematoma of the liver, which may cause compression of the IVC.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

IVC filter insertion via the right jugular vein.
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Figure 4: IVC filter insertion via the right jugular vein.

Mentions: One day later, an IVC filter was placed in the suprarenal IVC via the right jugular vein to protect against the risk of pulmonary embolism (Fig. 4). Localized intrathrombus lytic therapy was considered; but it was not performed due to concerns with respect to the underlying liver laceration and hematoma. Instead, we started oral anticoagulation therapy and performed close observation of bleeding, but no sign of bleeding was detected. The patient was discharged from hospital at 1 month after admission. On follow-up abdominal CT performed 2 months later, IVC thrombus had disappeared completely (Fig. 5).


Management of inferior vena cava thrombosis after blunt liver injury.

Kim KY, So BJ, Park DE - Korean J Hepatobiliary Pancreat Surg (2014)

IVC filter insertion via the right jugular vein.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4492325&req=5

Figure 4: IVC filter insertion via the right jugular vein.
Mentions: One day later, an IVC filter was placed in the suprarenal IVC via the right jugular vein to protect against the risk of pulmonary embolism (Fig. 4). Localized intrathrombus lytic therapy was considered; but it was not performed due to concerns with respect to the underlying liver laceration and hematoma. Instead, we started oral anticoagulation therapy and performed close observation of bleeding, but no sign of bleeding was detected. The patient was discharged from hospital at 1 month after admission. On follow-up abdominal CT performed 2 months later, IVC thrombus had disappeared completely (Fig. 5).

Bottom Line: Inferior vena cava (IVC) thrombosis after traumatic liver injury is an extremely rare condition, and only 12 cases have been reported in the English literature since 1911.The patient denied any symptoms of thrombophlebitis and did not have any evidence of hypercoagulable state.We placed an IVC filter via the right jugular vein and started the anticoagulation treatment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery, Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Iksan, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Inferior vena cava (IVC) thrombosis after traumatic liver injury is an extremely rare condition, and only 12 cases have been reported in the English literature since 1911. We report a case of a 26-year-old man who presented with IVC thrombosis after blunt liver injury. IVC thrombosis was incidentally detected by computed tomography 15 days after conservative management of blunt liver injury. The patient denied any symptoms of thrombophlebitis and did not have any evidence of hypercoagulable state. We placed an IVC filter via the right jugular vein and started the anticoagulation treatment. The patient recovered successfully without operative treatment and IVC thrombosis disappeared completely two months later. We suggest that that the possibility of IVC thrombosis should be considered in patients with a large hematoma of the liver, which may cause compression of the IVC.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus