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Management of inferior vena cava thrombosis after blunt liver injury.

Kim KY, So BJ, Park DE - Korean J Hepatobiliary Pancreat Surg (2014)

Bottom Line: Inferior vena cava (IVC) thrombosis after traumatic liver injury is an extremely rare condition, and only 12 cases have been reported in the English literature since 1911.The patient denied any symptoms of thrombophlebitis and did not have any evidence of hypercoagulable state.We placed an IVC filter via the right jugular vein and started the anticoagulation treatment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery, Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Iksan, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Inferior vena cava (IVC) thrombosis after traumatic liver injury is an extremely rare condition, and only 12 cases have been reported in the English literature since 1911. We report a case of a 26-year-old man who presented with IVC thrombosis after blunt liver injury. IVC thrombosis was incidentally detected by computed tomography 15 days after conservative management of blunt liver injury. The patient denied any symptoms of thrombophlebitis and did not have any evidence of hypercoagulable state. We placed an IVC filter via the right jugular vein and started the anticoagulation treatment. The patient recovered successfully without operative treatment and IVC thrombosis disappeared completely two months later. We suggest that that the possibility of IVC thrombosis should be considered in patients with a large hematoma of the liver, which may cause compression of the IVC.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Follow-up abdominal CT on the follow-up day 5 showing a slight decrease in the size of parenchymal hematoma.
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Figure 2: Follow-up abdominal CT on the follow-up day 5 showing a slight decrease in the size of parenchymal hematoma.

Mentions: Because the patient was hemodynamically stable and he did not have any other visceral organ injuries, he was managed conservatively in the intensive care unit. On follow-up day 2, there were no changes in the vital signs and there was no decrease in hemoglobin and hematocrit levels. As the patient also did not have any specific symptoms, we continued the conservative treatment. The follow-up abdominal CT on day 5 showed a slight decrease in the size of parenchymal hematoma and intra-abdominal fluid collection (Fig. 2). At this time point, he could walk by himself and could be given a regular diet.


Management of inferior vena cava thrombosis after blunt liver injury.

Kim KY, So BJ, Park DE - Korean J Hepatobiliary Pancreat Surg (2014)

Follow-up abdominal CT on the follow-up day 5 showing a slight decrease in the size of parenchymal hematoma.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4492325&req=5

Figure 2: Follow-up abdominal CT on the follow-up day 5 showing a slight decrease in the size of parenchymal hematoma.
Mentions: Because the patient was hemodynamically stable and he did not have any other visceral organ injuries, he was managed conservatively in the intensive care unit. On follow-up day 2, there were no changes in the vital signs and there was no decrease in hemoglobin and hematocrit levels. As the patient also did not have any specific symptoms, we continued the conservative treatment. The follow-up abdominal CT on day 5 showed a slight decrease in the size of parenchymal hematoma and intra-abdominal fluid collection (Fig. 2). At this time point, he could walk by himself and could be given a regular diet.

Bottom Line: Inferior vena cava (IVC) thrombosis after traumatic liver injury is an extremely rare condition, and only 12 cases have been reported in the English literature since 1911.The patient denied any symptoms of thrombophlebitis and did not have any evidence of hypercoagulable state.We placed an IVC filter via the right jugular vein and started the anticoagulation treatment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery, Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Iksan, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Inferior vena cava (IVC) thrombosis after traumatic liver injury is an extremely rare condition, and only 12 cases have been reported in the English literature since 1911. We report a case of a 26-year-old man who presented with IVC thrombosis after blunt liver injury. IVC thrombosis was incidentally detected by computed tomography 15 days after conservative management of blunt liver injury. The patient denied any symptoms of thrombophlebitis and did not have any evidence of hypercoagulable state. We placed an IVC filter via the right jugular vein and started the anticoagulation treatment. The patient recovered successfully without operative treatment and IVC thrombosis disappeared completely two months later. We suggest that that the possibility of IVC thrombosis should be considered in patients with a large hematoma of the liver, which may cause compression of the IVC.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus