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Optimal Exposure Biomarkers for Nonpersistent Chemicals in Environmental Epidemiology.

Calafat AM, Longnecker MP, Koch HM, Swan SH, Hauser R, Goldman LR, Lanphear BP, Rudel RA, Engel SM, Teitelbaum SL, Whyatt RM, Wolff MS - Environ. Health Perspect. (2015)

Bottom Line: Pharmacokinetics should be considered; for example, nonpersistent, semivolatile chemicals are metabolized quickly, and urine is the compartment with the highest concentrations of metabolites.Because these chemicals are nonpersistent, knowledge of intraindividual reliability over the biologic window of interest is also required.However, the biologic and technical factors noted above strongly support urine as the optimal matrix for measuring nonpersistent, semivolatile, hydrophilic environmental agents.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.

ABSTRACT
We discuss considerations that are essential when evaluating exposure to nonpersistent, semivolatile environmental chemicals such as phthalates and phenols (e.g., bisphenol A). A biomarker should be chosen to best represent usual personal exposures and not recent, adventitious, or extraneous exposures. Biomarkers should be selected to minimize contamination arising from collection, sampling, or analysis procedures. Pharmacokinetics should be considered; for example, nonpersistent, semivolatile chemicals are metabolized quickly, and urine is the compartment with the highest concentrations of metabolites. Because these chemicals are nonpersistent, knowledge of intraindividual reliability over the biologic window of interest is also required. In recent years researchers have increasingly used blood as a matrix for characterizing exposure to nonpersistent chemicals. However, the biologic and technical factors noted above strongly support urine as the optimal matrix for measuring nonpersistent, semivolatile, hydrophilic environmental agents.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Number of publications per year using blood or other non-urine biomarkers for bisphenol A (BPA) or phthalates, by type of study, from 2000 through 2014 (n = 80). The search strategy aimed to capture studies with measurements of free BPA or phthalate made on a human matrix, published from 2000 through 2014. We excluded 16 papers that were exclusively about the analytical chemistry methods of assay. We searched for English-language articles using the terms “phthalate” or “BPA,” measured in human serum, plasma, semen, adipose, milk, or saliva. The following list of PubMed identifiers, pasted into PubMed, retrieves the 80 articles we assessed, of which 38 are etiologic and 42 are exposure assessment: 25371878[uid] or 25337790[uid] or 25296284[uid] or 25268510[uid] or 25227326[uid] or 25213476[uid] or 25048886[uid] or 25036990[uid] or 24974312[uid] or 24816463[uid] or 24724919[uid] or 24720399[uid] or 24550655[uid] or 24503621[uid] or 24378374[uid] or 24336026[uid] or 24255718[uid] or 24025997[uid] or 23941471[uid] or 23904340[uid] or 23761051[uid] or 23710608[uid] or 23710174[uid] or 23667484[uid] or 23651625[uid] or 23506159[uid] or 23441348[uid] or 23411151[uid] or 23404131[uid] or 23377699[uid] or 23347089[uid] or 23213291[uid] or 23145999[uid] or 24524038[uid] or 22805002[uid] or 22722103[uid] or 22578698[uid] or 22498808[uid] or 22402483[uid] or 22381621[uid] or 22267833[uid] or 22050967[uid] or 21875366[uid] or 21705716[uid] or 21527603[uid] or 21440837[uid] or 24278551[uid] or 22953188[uid] or 21193545[uid] or 20822678[uid] or 20579427[uid] or 19706995[uid] or 19555962[uid] or 19444800[uid] or 19426969[uid] or 19165392[uid] or 18577445[uid] or 18273031[uid] or 18245696[uid] or 17822133[uid] or 17689919[uid] or 17661831[uid] or 17049806[uid] or 16603434[uid] or 16451866[uid] or 15995852[uid] or 15947000[uid] or 15893743[uid] or 15847671[uid] or 15644579[uid] or 14594632[uid] or 12869118[uid] or 12566679[uid] or 12417499[uid] or 12407035[uid] or 12401500[uid] or 11829464[uid] or 11604266[uid] or 10964036[uid] or 10716589[uid].
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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4492274&req=5

d35e409: Number of publications per year using blood or other non-urine biomarkers for bisphenol A (BPA) or phthalates, by type of study, from 2000 through 2014 (n = 80). The search strategy aimed to capture studies with measurements of free BPA or phthalate made on a human matrix, published from 2000 through 2014. We excluded 16 papers that were exclusively about the analytical chemistry methods of assay. We searched for English-language articles using the terms “phthalate” or “BPA,” measured in human serum, plasma, semen, adipose, milk, or saliva. The following list of PubMed identifiers, pasted into PubMed, retrieves the 80 articles we assessed, of which 38 are etiologic and 42 are exposure assessment: 25371878[uid] or 25337790[uid] or 25296284[uid] or 25268510[uid] or 25227326[uid] or 25213476[uid] or 25048886[uid] or 25036990[uid] or 24974312[uid] or 24816463[uid] or 24724919[uid] or 24720399[uid] or 24550655[uid] or 24503621[uid] or 24378374[uid] or 24336026[uid] or 24255718[uid] or 24025997[uid] or 23941471[uid] or 23904340[uid] or 23761051[uid] or 23710608[uid] or 23710174[uid] or 23667484[uid] or 23651625[uid] or 23506159[uid] or 23441348[uid] or 23411151[uid] or 23404131[uid] or 23377699[uid] or 23347089[uid] or 23213291[uid] or 23145999[uid] or 24524038[uid] or 22805002[uid] or 22722103[uid] or 22578698[uid] or 22498808[uid] or 22402483[uid] or 22381621[uid] or 22267833[uid] or 22050967[uid] or 21875366[uid] or 21705716[uid] or 21527603[uid] or 21440837[uid] or 24278551[uid] or 22953188[uid] or 21193545[uid] or 20822678[uid] or 20579427[uid] or 19706995[uid] or 19555962[uid] or 19444800[uid] or 19426969[uid] or 19165392[uid] or 18577445[uid] or 18273031[uid] or 18245696[uid] or 17822133[uid] or 17689919[uid] or 17661831[uid] or 17049806[uid] or 16603434[uid] or 16451866[uid] or 15995852[uid] or 15947000[uid] or 15893743[uid] or 15847671[uid] or 15644579[uid] or 14594632[uid] or 12869118[uid] or 12566679[uid] or 12417499[uid] or 12407035[uid] or 12401500[uid] or 11829464[uid] or 11604266[uid] or 10964036[uid] or 10716589[uid].


Optimal Exposure Biomarkers for Nonpersistent Chemicals in Environmental Epidemiology.

Calafat AM, Longnecker MP, Koch HM, Swan SH, Hauser R, Goldman LR, Lanphear BP, Rudel RA, Engel SM, Teitelbaum SL, Whyatt RM, Wolff MS - Environ. Health Perspect. (2015)

Number of publications per year using blood or other non-urine biomarkers for bisphenol A (BPA) or phthalates, by type of study, from 2000 through 2014 (n = 80). The search strategy aimed to capture studies with measurements of free BPA or phthalate made on a human matrix, published from 2000 through 2014. We excluded 16 papers that were exclusively about the analytical chemistry methods of assay. We searched for English-language articles using the terms “phthalate” or “BPA,” measured in human serum, plasma, semen, adipose, milk, or saliva. The following list of PubMed identifiers, pasted into PubMed, retrieves the 80 articles we assessed, of which 38 are etiologic and 42 are exposure assessment: 25371878[uid] or 25337790[uid] or 25296284[uid] or 25268510[uid] or 25227326[uid] or 25213476[uid] or 25048886[uid] or 25036990[uid] or 24974312[uid] or 24816463[uid] or 24724919[uid] or 24720399[uid] or 24550655[uid] or 24503621[uid] or 24378374[uid] or 24336026[uid] or 24255718[uid] or 24025997[uid] or 23941471[uid] or 23904340[uid] or 23761051[uid] or 23710608[uid] or 23710174[uid] or 23667484[uid] or 23651625[uid] or 23506159[uid] or 23441348[uid] or 23411151[uid] or 23404131[uid] or 23377699[uid] or 23347089[uid] or 23213291[uid] or 23145999[uid] or 24524038[uid] or 22805002[uid] or 22722103[uid] or 22578698[uid] or 22498808[uid] or 22402483[uid] or 22381621[uid] or 22267833[uid] or 22050967[uid] or 21875366[uid] or 21705716[uid] or 21527603[uid] or 21440837[uid] or 24278551[uid] or 22953188[uid] or 21193545[uid] or 20822678[uid] or 20579427[uid] or 19706995[uid] or 19555962[uid] or 19444800[uid] or 19426969[uid] or 19165392[uid] or 18577445[uid] or 18273031[uid] or 18245696[uid] or 17822133[uid] or 17689919[uid] or 17661831[uid] or 17049806[uid] or 16603434[uid] or 16451866[uid] or 15995852[uid] or 15947000[uid] or 15893743[uid] or 15847671[uid] or 15644579[uid] or 14594632[uid] or 12869118[uid] or 12566679[uid] or 12417499[uid] or 12407035[uid] or 12401500[uid] or 11829464[uid] or 11604266[uid] or 10964036[uid] or 10716589[uid].
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4492274&req=5

d35e409: Number of publications per year using blood or other non-urine biomarkers for bisphenol A (BPA) or phthalates, by type of study, from 2000 through 2014 (n = 80). The search strategy aimed to capture studies with measurements of free BPA or phthalate made on a human matrix, published from 2000 through 2014. We excluded 16 papers that were exclusively about the analytical chemistry methods of assay. We searched for English-language articles using the terms “phthalate” or “BPA,” measured in human serum, plasma, semen, adipose, milk, or saliva. The following list of PubMed identifiers, pasted into PubMed, retrieves the 80 articles we assessed, of which 38 are etiologic and 42 are exposure assessment: 25371878[uid] or 25337790[uid] or 25296284[uid] or 25268510[uid] or 25227326[uid] or 25213476[uid] or 25048886[uid] or 25036990[uid] or 24974312[uid] or 24816463[uid] or 24724919[uid] or 24720399[uid] or 24550655[uid] or 24503621[uid] or 24378374[uid] or 24336026[uid] or 24255718[uid] or 24025997[uid] or 23941471[uid] or 23904340[uid] or 23761051[uid] or 23710608[uid] or 23710174[uid] or 23667484[uid] or 23651625[uid] or 23506159[uid] or 23441348[uid] or 23411151[uid] or 23404131[uid] or 23377699[uid] or 23347089[uid] or 23213291[uid] or 23145999[uid] or 24524038[uid] or 22805002[uid] or 22722103[uid] or 22578698[uid] or 22498808[uid] or 22402483[uid] or 22381621[uid] or 22267833[uid] or 22050967[uid] or 21875366[uid] or 21705716[uid] or 21527603[uid] or 21440837[uid] or 24278551[uid] or 22953188[uid] or 21193545[uid] or 20822678[uid] or 20579427[uid] or 19706995[uid] or 19555962[uid] or 19444800[uid] or 19426969[uid] or 19165392[uid] or 18577445[uid] or 18273031[uid] or 18245696[uid] or 17822133[uid] or 17689919[uid] or 17661831[uid] or 17049806[uid] or 16603434[uid] or 16451866[uid] or 15995852[uid] or 15947000[uid] or 15893743[uid] or 15847671[uid] or 15644579[uid] or 14594632[uid] or 12869118[uid] or 12566679[uid] or 12417499[uid] or 12407035[uid] or 12401500[uid] or 11829464[uid] or 11604266[uid] or 10964036[uid] or 10716589[uid].
Bottom Line: Pharmacokinetics should be considered; for example, nonpersistent, semivolatile chemicals are metabolized quickly, and urine is the compartment with the highest concentrations of metabolites.Because these chemicals are nonpersistent, knowledge of intraindividual reliability over the biologic window of interest is also required.However, the biologic and technical factors noted above strongly support urine as the optimal matrix for measuring nonpersistent, semivolatile, hydrophilic environmental agents.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.

ABSTRACT
We discuss considerations that are essential when evaluating exposure to nonpersistent, semivolatile environmental chemicals such as phthalates and phenols (e.g., bisphenol A). A biomarker should be chosen to best represent usual personal exposures and not recent, adventitious, or extraneous exposures. Biomarkers should be selected to minimize contamination arising from collection, sampling, or analysis procedures. Pharmacokinetics should be considered; for example, nonpersistent, semivolatile chemicals are metabolized quickly, and urine is the compartment with the highest concentrations of metabolites. Because these chemicals are nonpersistent, knowledge of intraindividual reliability over the biologic window of interest is also required. In recent years researchers have increasingly used blood as a matrix for characterizing exposure to nonpersistent chemicals. However, the biologic and technical factors noted above strongly support urine as the optimal matrix for measuring nonpersistent, semivolatile, hydrophilic environmental agents.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus