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Blood Pressure and Same-Day Exposure to Air Pollution at School: Associations with Nano-Sized to Coarse PM in Children.

Pieters N, Koppen G, Van Poppel M, De Prins S, Cox B, Dons E, Nelen V, Panis LI, Plusquin M, Schoeters G, Nawrot TS - Environ. Health Perspect. (2015)

Bottom Line: Ultrafine particles (UFP) may contribute to the cardiovascular effects of particulate air pollution, partly because of their relatively efficient alveolar deposition.For the total UFP fraction, systolic blood pressure was 0.79 mmHg (95% CI: 0.07, 1.51; p = 0.03) higher, but no effects on systolic blood pressure were found for the nano-sized fractions with a diameter > 100 nm, nor PM2.5, PMcoarse, and PM10.The association was dependent on UFP size, and there was no association with the PM2.5 mass concentration.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Environmental Sciences, Hasselt University, Diepenbeek, Belgium.

ABSTRACT

Background: Ultrafine particles (UFP) may contribute to the cardiovascular effects of particulate air pollution, partly because of their relatively efficient alveolar deposition.

Objective: In this study, we assessed associations between blood pressure and short-term exposure to air pollution in a population of schoolchildren.

Methods: In 130 children (6-12 years of age), blood pressure was determined during two periods (spring and fall 2011). We used mixed models to study the association between blood pressure and ambient concentrations of particulate matter and ultrafine particles measured in the schools' playground.

Results: Independent of sex, age, height, and weight of the child, parental education, neighborhood socioeconomic status, fish consumption, heart rate, school, day of the week, season, wind speed, relative humidity, and temperature on the morning of examination, an interquartile range (860 particles/cm3) increase in nano-sized UFP fraction (20-30 nm) was associated with a 6.35 mmHg (95% CI: 1.56, 11.14; p = 0.01) increase in systolic blood pressure. For the total UFP fraction, systolic blood pressure was 0.79 mmHg (95% CI: 0.07, 1.51; p = 0.03) higher, but no effects on systolic blood pressure were found for the nano-sized fractions with a diameter > 100 nm, nor PM2.5, PMcoarse, and PM10. Diastolic blood pressure was not associated with any of the studied particulate mass fractions.

Conclusion: Children attending school on days with higher UFP concentrations (diameter < 100 nm) had higher systolic blood pressure. The association was dependent on UFP size, and there was no association with the PM2.5 mass concentration.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Concentration range of the accumulated UFP fractions (left y-axis) and temperature (right y-axis) from 0800 to 1000 hours on the day of clinical examination.
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f1: Concentration range of the accumulated UFP fractions (left y-axis) and temperature (right y-axis) from 0800 to 1000 hours on the day of clinical examination.

Mentions: The mean accumulated concentration for UFP, PM2.5, PMcoarse, and PM10 fractions, measured on the different examination days between 0800 and 1000 hours, and the corresponding temperature from 0800 to 1000 hours are given in Figures 1 and 2. The mean relative humidity was 70.3% and 84.0% for the first and second sampling period, respectively. The daily variation in relative humidity is shown in Supplemental Material, Figure S1. The distribution for the different UFP fractions and PM is given in Table 2. Correlations between the different size fractions of UFP and the coarse size fractions are shown in Supplemental Material, Table S1. The largest UFP fractions (100–200 nm and > 200 nm) were significantly correlated with PM2.5 and PM10; in contrast, the smallest UFP fractions (20–30 nm) were not correlated with PM2.5 or PM10.


Blood Pressure and Same-Day Exposure to Air Pollution at School: Associations with Nano-Sized to Coarse PM in Children.

Pieters N, Koppen G, Van Poppel M, De Prins S, Cox B, Dons E, Nelen V, Panis LI, Plusquin M, Schoeters G, Nawrot TS - Environ. Health Perspect. (2015)

Concentration range of the accumulated UFP fractions (left y-axis) and temperature (right y-axis) from 0800 to 1000 hours on the day of clinical examination.
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4492263&req=5

f1: Concentration range of the accumulated UFP fractions (left y-axis) and temperature (right y-axis) from 0800 to 1000 hours on the day of clinical examination.
Mentions: The mean accumulated concentration for UFP, PM2.5, PMcoarse, and PM10 fractions, measured on the different examination days between 0800 and 1000 hours, and the corresponding temperature from 0800 to 1000 hours are given in Figures 1 and 2. The mean relative humidity was 70.3% and 84.0% for the first and second sampling period, respectively. The daily variation in relative humidity is shown in Supplemental Material, Figure S1. The distribution for the different UFP fractions and PM is given in Table 2. Correlations between the different size fractions of UFP and the coarse size fractions are shown in Supplemental Material, Table S1. The largest UFP fractions (100–200 nm and > 200 nm) were significantly correlated with PM2.5 and PM10; in contrast, the smallest UFP fractions (20–30 nm) were not correlated with PM2.5 or PM10.

Bottom Line: Ultrafine particles (UFP) may contribute to the cardiovascular effects of particulate air pollution, partly because of their relatively efficient alveolar deposition.For the total UFP fraction, systolic blood pressure was 0.79 mmHg (95% CI: 0.07, 1.51; p = 0.03) higher, but no effects on systolic blood pressure were found for the nano-sized fractions with a diameter > 100 nm, nor PM2.5, PMcoarse, and PM10.The association was dependent on UFP size, and there was no association with the PM2.5 mass concentration.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Environmental Sciences, Hasselt University, Diepenbeek, Belgium.

ABSTRACT

Background: Ultrafine particles (UFP) may contribute to the cardiovascular effects of particulate air pollution, partly because of their relatively efficient alveolar deposition.

Objective: In this study, we assessed associations between blood pressure and short-term exposure to air pollution in a population of schoolchildren.

Methods: In 130 children (6-12 years of age), blood pressure was determined during two periods (spring and fall 2011). We used mixed models to study the association between blood pressure and ambient concentrations of particulate matter and ultrafine particles measured in the schools' playground.

Results: Independent of sex, age, height, and weight of the child, parental education, neighborhood socioeconomic status, fish consumption, heart rate, school, day of the week, season, wind speed, relative humidity, and temperature on the morning of examination, an interquartile range (860 particles/cm3) increase in nano-sized UFP fraction (20-30 nm) was associated with a 6.35 mmHg (95% CI: 1.56, 11.14; p = 0.01) increase in systolic blood pressure. For the total UFP fraction, systolic blood pressure was 0.79 mmHg (95% CI: 0.07, 1.51; p = 0.03) higher, but no effects on systolic blood pressure were found for the nano-sized fractions with a diameter > 100 nm, nor PM2.5, PMcoarse, and PM10. Diastolic blood pressure was not associated with any of the studied particulate mass fractions.

Conclusion: Children attending school on days with higher UFP concentrations (diameter < 100 nm) had higher systolic blood pressure. The association was dependent on UFP size, and there was no association with the PM2.5 mass concentration.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus