Limits...
Ambient Heat and Sudden Infant Death: A Case-Crossover Study Spanning 30 Years in Montreal, Canada.

Auger N, Fraser WD, Smargiassi A, Kosatsky T - Environ. Health Perspect. (2015)

Bottom Line: The likelihood of sudden death increased steadily with higher temperature.Associations were stronger for infants 3-12 months of age than for infants 1-2 months of age, with odds ratios of 3.90 (95% CI: 1.87, 8.13) and 1.73 (95% CI: 0.80, 3.73), respectively, for 29°C compared with 20°C on the day of the event.High ambient temperature may be a novel risk factor for SIDS, especially at ≥ 3 months of age.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institut national de santé publique du Québec, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Background: Climate change may lead to more severe and extreme heat waves in the future, but its potential impact on sudden infant death-a leading cause of infant mortality-is unclear.

Objectives: We sought to determine whether risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is elevated during hot weather.

Methods: We undertook a case-crossover analysis of all sudden infant deaths during warm periods in metropolitan Montreal, Quebec, Canada, from 1981 through 2010. Our analysis included a total of 196 certified cases of SIDS, including 89 deaths at 1-2 months of age, and 94 at 3-12 months. We estimated associations between maximum outdoor temperatures and SIDS by comparing outdoor temperatures on the day of or day before a SIDS event with temperatures on control days during the same month, using cubic splines to model temperature and adjusting for relative humidity.

Results: Maximum daily temperatures of ≥ 29°C on the same day were associated with 2.78 times greater odds of sudden infant death relative to 20°C (95% CI: 1.64, 4.70). The likelihood of sudden death increased steadily with higher temperature. Associations were stronger for infants 3-12 months of age than for infants 1-2 months of age, with odds ratios of 3.90 (95% CI: 1.87, 8.13) and 1.73 (95% CI: 0.80, 3.73), respectively, for 29°C compared with 20°C on the day of the event.

Conclusions: High ambient temperature may be a novel risk factor for SIDS, especially at ≥ 3 months of age. Climate change and the higher temperatures that result may account for a potentially greater proportion of sudden infant deaths in the future.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Association between maximum temperature and SIDS, Montreal, April–October 1981–2010. Odds ratio (solid blue line) and 95% CIs (dashed outer bands). All temperatures are relative to the 20°C mark, and are adjusted for mean relative humidity.
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4492261&req=5

f1: Association between maximum temperature and SIDS, Montreal, April–October 1981–2010. Odds ratio (solid blue line) and 95% CIs (dashed outer bands). All temperatures are relative to the 20°C mark, and are adjusted for mean relative humidity.

Mentions: In spline models for all ages combined, the odds of SIDS increased steadily for same-day maximum daily temperatures > 20°C, with odds ratios of 1.41 (95% CI: 1.71, 1.69), 2.12 (95% CI: 1.43, 3.14), and 3.18 (95% CI: 1.76, 5.77) for 24, 27, and 30°C compared with 20°C, respectively (Figure 1). Associations with maximum temperatures on the previous day were weaker, with odds ratios of 1.18 (95% CI: 0.97, 1.42), 1.40 (95% CI: 0.96, 2.06), and 1.70 (95% CI: 0.94, 3.09) for 24, 27, and 30°C compared with 20°C, respectively. Temperature on the second day before death was not associated with SIDS (data not shown). There appeared to be a slight but statistically nonsignificant increase in the odds of SIDS with low temperatures on the day of death. At 5°C, for example, there was an odds ratio of 1.52 (95% CI: 0.70, 3.32) compared with 20°C.


Ambient Heat and Sudden Infant Death: A Case-Crossover Study Spanning 30 Years in Montreal, Canada.

Auger N, Fraser WD, Smargiassi A, Kosatsky T - Environ. Health Perspect. (2015)

Association between maximum temperature and SIDS, Montreal, April–October 1981–2010. Odds ratio (solid blue line) and 95% CIs (dashed outer bands). All temperatures are relative to the 20°C mark, and are adjusted for mean relative humidity.
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4492261&req=5

f1: Association between maximum temperature and SIDS, Montreal, April–October 1981–2010. Odds ratio (solid blue line) and 95% CIs (dashed outer bands). All temperatures are relative to the 20°C mark, and are adjusted for mean relative humidity.
Mentions: In spline models for all ages combined, the odds of SIDS increased steadily for same-day maximum daily temperatures > 20°C, with odds ratios of 1.41 (95% CI: 1.71, 1.69), 2.12 (95% CI: 1.43, 3.14), and 3.18 (95% CI: 1.76, 5.77) for 24, 27, and 30°C compared with 20°C, respectively (Figure 1). Associations with maximum temperatures on the previous day were weaker, with odds ratios of 1.18 (95% CI: 0.97, 1.42), 1.40 (95% CI: 0.96, 2.06), and 1.70 (95% CI: 0.94, 3.09) for 24, 27, and 30°C compared with 20°C, respectively. Temperature on the second day before death was not associated with SIDS (data not shown). There appeared to be a slight but statistically nonsignificant increase in the odds of SIDS with low temperatures on the day of death. At 5°C, for example, there was an odds ratio of 1.52 (95% CI: 0.70, 3.32) compared with 20°C.

Bottom Line: The likelihood of sudden death increased steadily with higher temperature.Associations were stronger for infants 3-12 months of age than for infants 1-2 months of age, with odds ratios of 3.90 (95% CI: 1.87, 8.13) and 1.73 (95% CI: 0.80, 3.73), respectively, for 29°C compared with 20°C on the day of the event.High ambient temperature may be a novel risk factor for SIDS, especially at ≥ 3 months of age.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institut national de santé publique du Québec, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Background: Climate change may lead to more severe and extreme heat waves in the future, but its potential impact on sudden infant death-a leading cause of infant mortality-is unclear.

Objectives: We sought to determine whether risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is elevated during hot weather.

Methods: We undertook a case-crossover analysis of all sudden infant deaths during warm periods in metropolitan Montreal, Quebec, Canada, from 1981 through 2010. Our analysis included a total of 196 certified cases of SIDS, including 89 deaths at 1-2 months of age, and 94 at 3-12 months. We estimated associations between maximum outdoor temperatures and SIDS by comparing outdoor temperatures on the day of or day before a SIDS event with temperatures on control days during the same month, using cubic splines to model temperature and adjusting for relative humidity.

Results: Maximum daily temperatures of ≥ 29°C on the same day were associated with 2.78 times greater odds of sudden infant death relative to 20°C (95% CI: 1.64, 4.70). The likelihood of sudden death increased steadily with higher temperature. Associations were stronger for infants 3-12 months of age than for infants 1-2 months of age, with odds ratios of 3.90 (95% CI: 1.87, 8.13) and 1.73 (95% CI: 0.80, 3.73), respectively, for 29°C compared with 20°C on the day of the event.

Conclusions: High ambient temperature may be a novel risk factor for SIDS, especially at ≥ 3 months of age. Climate change and the higher temperatures that result may account for a potentially greater proportion of sudden infant deaths in the future.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus