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Maternal Blood Manganese and Early Neurodevelopment: The Mothers and Children's Environmental Health (MOCEH) Study.

Chung SE, Cheong HK, Ha EH, Kim BN, Ha M, Kim Y, Hong YC, Park H, Oh SY - Environ. Health Perspect. (2015)

Bottom Line: Manganese is an essential trace element and common component of water, soil, and air.The study population included 232 pairs of pregnant women and their infants at 6 months of age.Associations between maternal blood manganese and MDI and PDI scores followed an inverted U-shape dose-response curve after adjustment for potential confounders, with lower scores associated with both low and high blood concentrations [MDI: likelihood-ratio test (LRT) p = 0.075, PDI: LRT p = 0.038].

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: Manganese is an essential trace element and common component of water, soil, and air. Prenatal manganese exposure may affect fetal and infantile neurodevelopment, but reports on in utero manganese exposure and infant neurodevelopment are rare.

Objective: This study was conducted to investigate a relationship between maternal blood manganese level and neurodevelopment of infants at 6 months of age.

Methods: Data were obtained from the Mothers and Children's Environmental Health (MOCEH) birth cohort study. The study population included 232 pairs of pregnant women and their infants at 6 months of age. Maternal blood manganese was measured at term, just before delivery. Mental and psychomotor development in infancy was assessed at 6 months of age using the Bayley Scales of Infant Development. The relationship between maternal blood manganese level and the mental and psychomotor development indexes (MDI and PDI) was estimated for manganese modeled as a linear and as a categorical variable and using penalized splines for nonlinear modeling.

Results: Mean ± SD maternal blood manganese concentration was 22.5 ± 6.5 μg/L. After adjustment for potential confounders, blood manganese was used as a continuous variable in a linear and nonlinear model. Associations between maternal blood manganese and MDI and PDI scores followed an inverted U-shape dose-response curve after adjustment for potential confounders, with lower scores associated with both low and high blood concentrations [MDI: likelihood-ratio test (LRT) p = 0.075, PDI: LRT p = 0.038]. Associations of both outcomes with increasing blood manganese shifted from positive to negative at concentrations of 24-28 μg/L in this cohort of term, normal birth weight children.

Conclusion: Although no cut-off point has been established to define manganese toxicity, both high and low blood manganese levels may be associated with neurobehavioral function in infants.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Models of MDI/PDI and maternal blood manganese levels at term, least-square mean after adjusting for maternal age (years), gestation period (days), monthly income, breastfeeding status, maternal total calorie intake (kcal/day), infant birth order, residential area, infant sex, and birth weight (kg). The ranges of blood manganese levels at term were < 20 μg/L (n = 82), 20–24 μg/L (n = 64), 25–29 μg/L (n = 34), and ≥ 30 μg/ L (n = 23), respectively. Error bars represent standard errors.
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f2: Models of MDI/PDI and maternal blood manganese levels at term, least-square mean after adjusting for maternal age (years), gestation period (days), monthly income, breastfeeding status, maternal total calorie intake (kcal/day), infant birth order, residential area, infant sex, and birth weight (kg). The ranges of blood manganese levels at term were < 20 μg/L (n = 82), 20–24 μg/L (n = 64), 25–29 μg/L (n = 34), and ≥ 30 μg/ L (n = 23), respectively. Error bars represent standard errors.

Mentions: We used separate linear regression models to estimate associations between maternal blood manganese categorized according to four concentration groups (< 20 μg/L, 20.0–24.9 μg/L, 25.0–29.9 μg/L, and ≥ 30.0 μg/L) and MDI or PDI. Models of maternal blood manganese as a categorical variable also indicated an inverted U-shaped dose response (Figure 2). The adjusted mean PDI significantly differed across manganese concentration groups, after adjusting for potential confounders (total model, p = 0.016), but MDI did not differ by manganese concentration (total model, p = 0.250) (Figure 2). Children from the group with maternal blood manganese of 25.0–29.9 μg/L demonstrated higher 6-month neurodevelopmental scores (MDI and PDI) compared with children in the highest manganese group (≥ 30.0 μg/L) and the lowest manganese group (< 20 μg/L) (mean MDI scores = 93.2 ± 1.3, mean PDI scores = 92.2 ± 1.5). The PDI scores increased 7.8 points until maternal blood manganese reached 25.0–29.9 μg/L (mean PDI scores = 100.0 ± 2.4) and declined sharply by 11.0 points over the highest maternal blood manganese level (≥ 30.0 μg/L) (mean PDI scores = 89.0 ± 2.9). The MDI scores increased 4.1 points until blood manganese level reached 25.0–29.9 μg/L (mean MDI scores = 97.3 ± 2.0) and declined by 5.4 points at the highest blood manganese level (≥ 30.0 μg/L) (mean MDI scores = 91.8 ± 2.5) (Figure 2).


Maternal Blood Manganese and Early Neurodevelopment: The Mothers and Children's Environmental Health (MOCEH) Study.

Chung SE, Cheong HK, Ha EH, Kim BN, Ha M, Kim Y, Hong YC, Park H, Oh SY - Environ. Health Perspect. (2015)

Models of MDI/PDI and maternal blood manganese levels at term, least-square mean after adjusting for maternal age (years), gestation period (days), monthly income, breastfeeding status, maternal total calorie intake (kcal/day), infant birth order, residential area, infant sex, and birth weight (kg). The ranges of blood manganese levels at term were < 20 μg/L (n = 82), 20–24 μg/L (n = 64), 25–29 μg/L (n = 34), and ≥ 30 μg/ L (n = 23), respectively. Error bars represent standard errors.
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4492260&req=5

f2: Models of MDI/PDI and maternal blood manganese levels at term, least-square mean after adjusting for maternal age (years), gestation period (days), monthly income, breastfeeding status, maternal total calorie intake (kcal/day), infant birth order, residential area, infant sex, and birth weight (kg). The ranges of blood manganese levels at term were < 20 μg/L (n = 82), 20–24 μg/L (n = 64), 25–29 μg/L (n = 34), and ≥ 30 μg/ L (n = 23), respectively. Error bars represent standard errors.
Mentions: We used separate linear regression models to estimate associations between maternal blood manganese categorized according to four concentration groups (< 20 μg/L, 20.0–24.9 μg/L, 25.0–29.9 μg/L, and ≥ 30.0 μg/L) and MDI or PDI. Models of maternal blood manganese as a categorical variable also indicated an inverted U-shaped dose response (Figure 2). The adjusted mean PDI significantly differed across manganese concentration groups, after adjusting for potential confounders (total model, p = 0.016), but MDI did not differ by manganese concentration (total model, p = 0.250) (Figure 2). Children from the group with maternal blood manganese of 25.0–29.9 μg/L demonstrated higher 6-month neurodevelopmental scores (MDI and PDI) compared with children in the highest manganese group (≥ 30.0 μg/L) and the lowest manganese group (< 20 μg/L) (mean MDI scores = 93.2 ± 1.3, mean PDI scores = 92.2 ± 1.5). The PDI scores increased 7.8 points until maternal blood manganese reached 25.0–29.9 μg/L (mean PDI scores = 100.0 ± 2.4) and declined sharply by 11.0 points over the highest maternal blood manganese level (≥ 30.0 μg/L) (mean PDI scores = 89.0 ± 2.9). The MDI scores increased 4.1 points until blood manganese level reached 25.0–29.9 μg/L (mean MDI scores = 97.3 ± 2.0) and declined by 5.4 points at the highest blood manganese level (≥ 30.0 μg/L) (mean MDI scores = 91.8 ± 2.5) (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: Manganese is an essential trace element and common component of water, soil, and air.The study population included 232 pairs of pregnant women and their infants at 6 months of age.Associations between maternal blood manganese and MDI and PDI scores followed an inverted U-shape dose-response curve after adjustment for potential confounders, with lower scores associated with both low and high blood concentrations [MDI: likelihood-ratio test (LRT) p = 0.075, PDI: LRT p = 0.038].

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: Manganese is an essential trace element and common component of water, soil, and air. Prenatal manganese exposure may affect fetal and infantile neurodevelopment, but reports on in utero manganese exposure and infant neurodevelopment are rare.

Objective: This study was conducted to investigate a relationship between maternal blood manganese level and neurodevelopment of infants at 6 months of age.

Methods: Data were obtained from the Mothers and Children's Environmental Health (MOCEH) birth cohort study. The study population included 232 pairs of pregnant women and their infants at 6 months of age. Maternal blood manganese was measured at term, just before delivery. Mental and psychomotor development in infancy was assessed at 6 months of age using the Bayley Scales of Infant Development. The relationship between maternal blood manganese level and the mental and psychomotor development indexes (MDI and PDI) was estimated for manganese modeled as a linear and as a categorical variable and using penalized splines for nonlinear modeling.

Results: Mean ± SD maternal blood manganese concentration was 22.5 ± 6.5 μg/L. After adjustment for potential confounders, blood manganese was used as a continuous variable in a linear and nonlinear model. Associations between maternal blood manganese and MDI and PDI scores followed an inverted U-shape dose-response curve after adjustment for potential confounders, with lower scores associated with both low and high blood concentrations [MDI: likelihood-ratio test (LRT) p = 0.075, PDI: LRT p = 0.038]. Associations of both outcomes with increasing blood manganese shifted from positive to negative at concentrations of 24-28 μg/L in this cohort of term, normal birth weight children.

Conclusion: Although no cut-off point has been established to define manganese toxicity, both high and low blood manganese levels may be associated with neurobehavioral function in infants.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus