Limits...
POPs and Gut Microbiota: Dietary Exposure Alters Ratio of Bacterial Species.

Potera C - Environ. Health Perspect. (2015)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) have been implicated in myriad human health problems, including cancer, neurologic, immunologic, and reproductive defects, among many other adverse health effects... For five days, Patterson’s team fed food pellets spiked with 24 µg/kg TCDF to adult male mice that either carried or lacked the AhR gene... Mice that lacked the AhR gene underwent marked changes in their gut microbial populations, with a decrease in Firmicutes species and an increase in Bacteroides species... These changes were associated with significantly increased levels of bile acids and short-chain fatty acids, altered liver function, increased intestinal inflammation, and inhibited signaling of the farnesoid X receptor, a key regulator of fat and glucose metabolism... The mice received a very high dose of TCDF, equivalent to 3,000 ng/kg in people... Now they’re feeding mice lower chronic doses of TCDF, and according to Patterson, preliminary data are showing similar changes as those seen at higher TCDF doses... Patterson’s results “show significant changes in the gut microbiome profile after TCDF administration, and they raise very interesting and important questions... But exactly what that means downstream needs more work to answer,” says Stephen Safe, a distinguished professor of toxicology at Texas A&M University, who was not involved with the study... The results add to mounting evidence that changes in the gut microbiome modulate many different diseases, Safe says... The results also contribute to the growing evidence that the gut microbiome is an important, although still not fully understood, player in the toxicity of environmental pollutants, says Michal Toborek, a professor and vice chair for research at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine... Toborek previously reported in EHP that high doses of polychlorinated biphenyls, another type of POP, altered the composition of the gut microbiome in mice but that exercise appeared to blunt this effect.

No MeSH data available.


Scanning electron microscope images show dense networks of bacteria in the small intestines of control mice (top), which were dramatically depleted in the small intestines of TCDF-treated mice (bottom).Source: Zhang et al. (2015)3
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4492257&req=5

f1: Scanning electron microscope images show dense networks of bacteria in the small intestines of control mice (top), which were dramatically depleted in the small intestines of TCDF-treated mice (bottom).Source: Zhang et al. (2015)3


POPs and Gut Microbiota: Dietary Exposure Alters Ratio of Bacterial Species.

Potera C - Environ. Health Perspect. (2015)

Scanning electron microscope images show dense networks of bacteria in the small intestines of control mice (top), which were dramatically depleted in the small intestines of TCDF-treated mice (bottom).Source: Zhang et al. (2015)3
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4492257&req=5

f1: Scanning electron microscope images show dense networks of bacteria in the small intestines of control mice (top), which were dramatically depleted in the small intestines of TCDF-treated mice (bottom).Source: Zhang et al. (2015)3

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) have been implicated in myriad human health problems, including cancer, neurologic, immunologic, and reproductive defects, among many other adverse health effects... For five days, Patterson’s team fed food pellets spiked with 24 µg/kg TCDF to adult male mice that either carried or lacked the AhR gene... Mice that lacked the AhR gene underwent marked changes in their gut microbial populations, with a decrease in Firmicutes species and an increase in Bacteroides species... These changes were associated with significantly increased levels of bile acids and short-chain fatty acids, altered liver function, increased intestinal inflammation, and inhibited signaling of the farnesoid X receptor, a key regulator of fat and glucose metabolism... The mice received a very high dose of TCDF, equivalent to 3,000 ng/kg in people... Now they’re feeding mice lower chronic doses of TCDF, and according to Patterson, preliminary data are showing similar changes as those seen at higher TCDF doses... Patterson’s results “show significant changes in the gut microbiome profile after TCDF administration, and they raise very interesting and important questions... But exactly what that means downstream needs more work to answer,” says Stephen Safe, a distinguished professor of toxicology at Texas A&M University, who was not involved with the study... The results add to mounting evidence that changes in the gut microbiome modulate many different diseases, Safe says... The results also contribute to the growing evidence that the gut microbiome is an important, although still not fully understood, player in the toxicity of environmental pollutants, says Michal Toborek, a professor and vice chair for research at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine... Toborek previously reported in EHP that high doses of polychlorinated biphenyls, another type of POP, altered the composition of the gut microbiome in mice but that exercise appeared to blunt this effect.

No MeSH data available.